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Full text of "Report"

Maryland Koon> 
Jotveisity of Maryland Ufe^ 
CoUoce Park. Md 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/report00mary_83 



STATE OF MARYLAND 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



EIGHTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT 

Of The 

■suKj^j^t State Board of Education . 

SHOWING CONDITION 
Of The 

Public Schools of Maryland 

For The 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 




BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 




MARYLAND DIRECTORY 

OF 

SCHOOL OFFICIALS, JUNE 1955 
MARYLAND STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Name Address Term Expires 

Wendell D. Allen, President Baltimore 1956 

Jerome Framptom, Jr., Vice-president Federalsburg 1957 

William A. Gunter Cumberland 1960 

D wight O. W. Holmes Baltimore 1958 

Mrs. Richard Marcus Pikesville 1959 

Mrs. Curtis Walker Chevy Chase 1955 

Vacancy 

MARYLAND STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 

2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 
THOMAS G. PULLEN, JR. 

State Superintendent of Schools 

Name Position 

John J. Seidel Assistant State Superintendent for Vocational Education 

D. W. Zimmerman Assistant State Superintendent in Finance and Research 

Merle S. Bateman Director of Certification and Accreditation 

James E. Spitznas Director of Instruction 

Helen M. Clark Director of Library Extension 

R. C. Thompson Director of Vocational Rehabilitation 

James L. Reid Supervisor of School Plant Planning 

*F. J. Thuman Consultant Architect 

Helen D. George Editor 

Ruth E. Hobbs Administrative Assistant 

Margaret E. Albaugh Stenographer-Secretary 

Alice Algie Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Suzanne Ness Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Corinne D. Combs Senior Typist 

Mrs. Margaret P. Rappe Senior Typist 

Mrs. Wilda R. Taylor Telephone Operator 

Lloyd E. Holmes Duplicating Machine Operator II 

Division of Vocational Education — John J. Seidel, Assistant Superintendent 

Harry M. McDonald Supervisor of Agriculture 

Evelyn F. Miller Supervisor of Home Economics 

Herschel M. James Supervisor of Industrial Education 

Dwight P. Jacobus Supervisor of Educational Services to Industry 

Eleanor G. Weagly Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

George A. Myers Assistant Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Joseph S. Endslow Assistant Supervisor of Veterans On-the-Farm Training Program 

Frank H. Nachman Counselor for Veterans On-the-Job Training Program 

Elizabeth McGinnity Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Florence B. Ackerman Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Hazel B. Wilkerson Senior Stenographer 

Lillian O. Erpenstein Senior Stenographer 

Bessie L Rones Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part-time) . . . .' Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Virginia C. Cooper . Senior Typist 

Florence M. Brady ! Junior Clerk 



Division of Finance and Research — D. W. Zimmerman, Assistant Superintendent 

William S. Sartorius Assistant Director 

William L. Barrall Supervisor of Finance 

R. Christine Hogan Supervisor of Research 

Charles V. Akeley Assistant Supervisor of Finance 

C. William Anthony Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Mrs. Anne K. Carroll Assistant Supervisor of Research 

Bernard G. Geyer Auditor 

Mrs. Genevieve J. Nekervis Statistician I 

Mrs. Verda K. McClow Statistician II 

Mary E. McNeill Statistician II 

Mrs. Mary B. Prince Statistical Clerk 

Mrs. Grace Steele Travers Principal Account Clerk I 

Mrs. Laura Gaither Principal Account Clerk II 

Minnie Gerber Principal Account Clerk II 

* Part time 



2 



Name Position 

Mrs. Mary E. Hoover Principal Account Clerk II 

Blanche E. Keen Principal Account ClerklH 

Helen Ellis Stenographer-Secretary 

Carry e Hamburger Stenographer-Secretary 

Dorothy E. Young Stenographer-Secretary 

D. Joan Walterhoefer Senior Stenographer 

Helen L. Askin Report Typist 

Mrs. Margaret J. Meister Senior Clerk 

Augusta Schoberg Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Marie Wollschlager Key Punch Operator 

Division of Certification and Accreditation — Merle S. Bateman, Director 

W. Theodore Boston Supervisor of Teacher and Higher Education and Assistant Director 

M. Eleanor Rice Supervisor of Certification 

Helen L. Widmyer Supervisor of Accreditation 

Charles C. Conlon Assistant Supervisor of Accreditation 

Richard K. McKay Assistant Supervisor of Accreditation 

Elsie F. Forman Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Margaret Bray Senior Stenographer 

Gloria M. Korsch Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Bessie S. Price Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Gertrude A. Gorrell Senior Clerk 

Lee F. Kolman Senior Clerk 

Mrs. Doris Van Cleaf Senior Clerk 

Division of Instruction — James E. Spitznas, Director 

Mrs. Grace Alder Dorsey Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Paul E. Huffington Supervisor of High Schools 

Willis H. White Supervisor of High Schools 

George M. Crawford Supervisor of Curriculum 

Mrs. Gladys T. Hopkins Supervisor of Curriculum 

Herbert R. Steiner Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

Dorothy W. Shires Supervisor of Pupil Personnel and Parent Education 

Mrs. Geneva Ely Flickinger Supervisor of Special Education 

Ethel E. Sammis Assistant Supervisor of Physical Education and Recreation 

E. Drusilla Chairs Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Beverly B. Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Mildred Faulstitch Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Constance Fish Senior Stenographer 

Sue E. Stimely (part-time) Senior Stenographer 

Division of Vocational Rehabilitation — R. C. Thompson, Director 

STATE OFFICE 

Lionel Burgess Supervisor of Case Services 

W. Bird Terwilliger Supervisor of Guidance Training and Placement 

George W. Keller Assistant Supervisor of Services for the Blind 

John T. Goembel Craft Specialist 

*Dean W. Roberts, M.D Medical Consultant 

Kathleen E. Scheve Stenographer-Secretary 

Anne Nusinov Principal Stenographer 

Charlotte A. Sylvester Principal Stenographer 

Doris P. Nolan Senior Stenographer 

BALTIMORE CITY OFFICE 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Thomas D. Braun Supervisor 

Ernest C. Allnutt, Jr Counselor 

Foy L. Lunsford Counselor 

Irwin D. Medinger Counselor 

William B. Melville Counselor 

Ruth F. Ring Counselor 

H. Smith Shumway Counselor 

James D. Smyth Counselor 

Carroll L. Speck Counselor 

Emma Lueckert Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Claire S. Anderson Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Ruth Friedland Senior Stenographer 

Jane E. Gallagher Senior Stenographer 

June F. Roemer Senior Stenographer 

Mrs. Olive Mayo Receptionist 

CENTRAL MARYLAND BRANCH 
2 West Redwood Street, Baltimore 1 

Myrtle E. Chell Special Counselor for the Tuberculous 

James S. Dashiell Counselor 

Martha R. Harrison Counselor 

Harold Hayes Counselor 

William W. Lamprell Counselor 

Fedon Nides Counselor 

Mrs. Elizabeth B. Swisher Counselor 

T. Janet Kammer Senior Stenographer 

Beverly J. Shealn Senior Stenographer 

Bell Sklar Senior Stenographer 

* Part time 

3 



Name Position 
EASTERN SHORE BRANCH 
117 Calvert Building, Salisbury 

Raymond H. Simmons Assistant Supervisor 

Robert L. Burton Counselor 

Frank A. Tarbutton Counselor, Board of Education, Chestertown 

Mrs. Anne E. Bishop Senior Stenographer 

SOUTHERN MARYLAND BRANCH 

4313 Hamilton Street, Hyattsville 

Merl D, Myers Assistant Supervisor 

H. Dorsey Devlin Counselor 

Carroll Walsh Counselor, Board of Education, Rockville 

Mrs. Frances G. Smith Senior'Stenographer 

WESTERN MARYLAND BRANCH 

122 West Washington Street, Hagerstown 

Kenneth G. Stoner Assistant Supervisor 

J. Leo Delaney Counselor, 111 Union Street, Cumberland 

William C. Hill Counselor, 115 E. Church Street, Frederick 

Mrs. Alfreda E. Coffman Senior Stenographer 

Division of Library Extension — Helen M. Clark, Director 
400 Cathedral Street, Baltimore 1 

Mae Graham Supervisor of School and Children's Libraries 

Nettie B. Taylor Supervisor of County and Institutional Libraries 

Eleanor Hocker Readers' Counselor 

Harry E. Foster. Technical Counselor 

M. E. Naomi Johnson Associate Librarian 

Josephine M. Baldwin Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Suzanne V. Pearce Assistant Librarian 

Mrs. Beverly M. Burmeister Library Assistant 

Doris L. Anderson Stenographer-Secretary 

Mrs. Johann Nizer Armiger Senior Stenographer 

Martha Keydash Senior Stenographer 

Regina Herrmann Senior Typist 

Marlyn L. Masson Junior Typist 

Ay delotte L. Meister Junior Clerk 

Louis E. Myers Porter 

PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND— JUNE 1955 

County Library Librarian 

Allegany Cumberland Free Public Library Mary G. Walsh 

La Vale Public Library Mrs. William G. Barger 

Westernport Public Library Mrs. Elizabeth Thomas 

Anne Arundel Annapolis and Anne Arundel County Library, 

Annapolis Esther King 

Kuethe Library, Glen Burnie Helen Zeman 

Baltimore City Enoch Pratt Free Library Amy Winslow 

Baltimore Baltimore County Library, Towson Richard Minnich 

Calvert Calvert County Public Free Library, 

Prince Frederick Mrs. William W. Duke 

Caroline Denton Public Library Mrs. G. Daniel Crouse 

Federalsburg Community Library Mrs. Carolyn G. Noble 

Ridgely Community Library Mrs. Paul Hoffman 

Carroll Davis Library, Westminster Mrs. Helen Rex Shroyer 

Cecil Cecil County Library, Elkton Mrs. Dorothy W. Jefferson 

Cecilton Community Library Mrs. Alfred L. Pierce 

Charles Charles County Library, La Plata Doris Holmes 

Dorchester Dorchester County Public Library, Cambridge. Mrs. Margaret Henry 

Hurlock Free Public Library Mrs. Floyd N. Harper 

Vienna Public Library Mrs. Alan Webb 

Frederick C. Burr Artz Library, Frederick Josephine Etchison 

Emmitsburg Public Library Louise Sebold 

Garrett Ruth Enlow Library of Garrett County, 

Oakland Edith Brock 

Harford Harford County Library, Bel Air Mrs. Dorothy Glackin 

Harve de Grace Public Library Mrs. Roswell Poplar 

Howard Howard County Library, Ellicott City Mrs. Lenna Burgess 

Kent Chestertown Public Library Cornelia Davis 

Montgomery Montgomery County Department of Public 

Libraries, Gaithersburg George B. Moreland 

Rockville Public Library Mrs. Rose C. Miller 

Takoma Park Public Library Mrs. Ruth B. Pratt 

Prince George's Prince George's County Memorial Library, 

Hyattsville Mrs. Mary Kenan Hadley 

Greenbelt Public Library Mrs. Marjorie A. Muir 

Queen Anne's Queen Anne's County Library, Centreville . . . .Mrs. Elizabeth fl. Baker 

St. Mary's St. Mary's County Memorial Library, 

Leonardtown Eloise Pickrell 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES IN MARYLAND— Continued 

County Library Librarian 

Somerset Corbin Memorial Library, Crisfteld Mrs. Gladys Daugherty 

Princess Anne Public Library Mrs. J. Randolph Field 

Vaughn Hoffman Memorial Library, 

Rhodes Point Mrs. Doris Spriggs 

Talbot Talbot County Free Library, Easton Mrs. David S. Stewart 

Washington Washington County Free Library, 

Hagerstown Mrs. Mary Louise Holzafel 

Wicomico Wicomico County Free Library, Salisbury Mrs. Fred Horsley, Jr. 

Worcester Berlin Public Library Mary Bailey 

Pocomoke City Public Library Mrs. Byron H. Ollendike 

Snow Hill Public Library Mrs. Paul C. Kenney 

PRESIDENTS OF STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 

Earle T. Hawkins Towson William E. Henry Bowie 

R. Bowen Hardesty Frostburg Miles W. Connor Coppin, Baltimore-17 

J. D. Blackwell Salisbury 

MARYLAND TEACHERS' RETIREMENT SYSTEM 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICE STAFF 
31 Light Street, Baltimore 2 

Name Position 

Hooper S. Miles, Chairman State Treasurer 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr., Vice-chairman State Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary S. Ellis Principal, North Salisbury Elementary School, Wicomico County 

J. Millard Tawes State Comptroller 

Willis H. White Supervisor of High Schools, State Department of Education 

John P. Mannion Director 

C. Christis Accountant 

Minnie M. Hamilton Administrative Assistant 

Mrs. Dorothy Atlee Principal Account Clerk II 

Mrs. Aneta Richardson Accounting Machine Operator 

Mrs. Audrey Beere Accounting Machine Operator 

Grace R. Perry Senior Typist 

Mrs. Edna Doyle Senior Clerk 

MARYLAND COUNTY ADMINISTRATIVE AND SUPERVISORY STAFFS 

ALLEGANY COUNTY 
Cumberland 

Ralph R. Webster Superintendent of Schools 

Richard T. Rizer Supervisor of Secondary Education and Assistant Superintendent 

Lewyn C. Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Arthur G. Ramey Supervisor of Physical Education and Transportation 

Jane E. Botsford Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Winifred Greene Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Mildred E. Willison Supervisor of Elementary Education 

M. Jean Camper Supervisor of Special Education 

W. Valgene Routch Supervisor of Music Education 

Julius D. Lonnholm Supervisor of Vocational, Industrial, and Adult Education 

Theodore P. Foote Supervisor of Art Education 

Ruth C. McColly Supervisor of Home Economics 

Joseph T. Downey Supervisor of Maintenance 

Mrs. Gladys Miller Eaton Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Homer S. Higgins Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY 
Annapolis 

David S. Jenkins Superintendent of Schools 

Fred L. Alexander . Administrative Assistant 

R. Harold McCann Assistant Superintendent, Administrative 

Mrs. Madolyn R. Powers Supervisor of Cafeterias 

Dennis Turner Supervisor of Maintenance 

Frank G. Baker, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

Richard D. Carlson Supervisor of Planning 

Leonard Johnson Supervisor of Custodial Services 

Howard A. Kinhart Assistant Superintendent, Senior High Schools 

Ruth V. Dudderar Assistant Superintendent, Elementary and Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Virginia D. Moore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Leviah Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Evelyn P. Reed Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

H. Elizabeth Slater Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Sarah V. Jones Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Robert S. Shaffner Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Katherine Kibler Supervisor of Reading 

Ruth P. Eason Supervisor of Special Education 

Doris M. Clements Supervisor of Home Economics 

Frank C. Gunderloy Supervisor of Vocational and Technical Education 

Margaret A. Adams Supervisor of Music 

Mrs. Eleanor B. Waring Director of Personnel 

Mary E. Moss Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Ellen T. Elliott Supervisor of Personnel Procurement 

Mrs. Ruth J. McNelly Supervisor of Finance and Certification 



Name Position 
BALTIMORE COUNTY 
Towson 
(1) Sparrows Point 

Edward G. Stapleton .Superintendent of Schools 

James A. Sensenbaugh Assistant Superintendent in Administration 

James B. O'Toole, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Instruction 

G. Alfred Helwig Director of Curriculum 

B. Melvin Cole Director of Elementary Education 

Homer O. Elseroad Director of Secondary Education 

M. Katherine Dost Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Clotilde C. Drechsler Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Myrtle S. Eckhardt Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Jennie E. Jessop Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Hilda Kestner Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Anna G. Shepperd Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

(1) Mrs. Pauline J. Hobbs Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Wylda F. Benson Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Stella H. Johnston Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louella H. Woodward Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Ralph W. Gifford Supervisor of High Schools 

Helen E. Hale Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph B. Hillyard Supervisor of High Schools 

Jean C. Sisk Supervisor of High Schools 

*Minnie H. Woolford Supervisor of Colored High Schools 

Olive T. Jobes Supervisor of Art 

Harold S. Martin Supervisor of Physical Education 

John W. Craft Supervisor of Music 

Thomas R. Lawrence Supervisor of Music 

Thomas M. Greene Supervisor of Business and Adult Education 

Mary E. Kelleher Supervisor of Home Economics 

Arthur A. Dick Supervisor of Vocational Education and Industrial Arts 

Elizabeth D. Hodges Supervisor of Library Service 

Anna R. Meeks Supervisor of Guidance 

Ralph E. Kessler Supervisor of Special Education 

N. Harry Camp, Jr Director of Clinical Services 

Herman C. Burton Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Ruthetta Lippy Supervisor of School Lunch Service 

Walter M. Gordon Supervisor of Transportation 

William T. Willis, Jr Assistant Superintendent in Business Operations 

William C. Feader Supervisor of Accounting 

Herd S. Eburg Supervisor of Plant Maintenance 

Ian Gordon Supervisor of Plant Operation 

Morris R. Baker Engineer for Plant Management 

CALVERT COUNTY 
Prince Frederick 

Maurice A. Dunkle Superintendent of Schools 

Herman A. Hauver Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Mildred G. Finlon Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Thelma M. Cornish Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola M. Parks .« Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

CAROLINE COUNTY 
Denton 

W. Stewart Fitzgerald Superintendent of Schools 

Fred G. Usilton Supervisor of High Schools 

Beatrice Williams Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Lula D. Ward • Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Frank Gerhardt Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

CARROLL COUNTY 

Westminster 

Samuel M. Jenness Superintendent of Schools 

John F. Wooden, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Gerald E. Richter Supervisor of High Schools 

Ruth E. DeVore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Charles E. Reck Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Josephine West Supervisor of Home Economics and Cafeterias 

*Philip Royer Supervisor of Music 

*Mae E. Prince Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Maye E. Grimes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

CECIL COUNTY 
Elkton 

Morris W. Rannels Superintendent of Schools 

E. B. Fockler Supervisor of High Schools 

William C. Graham Supervisor of High Schools 

Olive L. Reynolds Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Mildred L. Sowers Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Rachel F. Boyd Supervisor of Home Economics 

Edwin H. Barnes Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

James M. Renn Supervisor of Maintenance 

* Part time 

6 



Name Position 
CHARLES COUNTY 
La Plata 

T. Carlyle Martin , Superintendent of Schools 

Christine E. Pierson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Edward C. Turner Supervisor of High Schools 

Joseph C. Parks Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Brown Supervisor of Colored High Schools 

Mrs. Cecelia G. Farrall Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Margaret A. Posey Supervisor of Cafeterias 

DORCHESTER COUNTY 

Cambridge 

James G. Busick Superintendent of Schools 

Albert S. Farver Supervisor of High Schools 

Evelyn E. Johnson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Viola J. Comegys ' Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

John T. Comer, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

FREDERICK COUNTY 
Frederick 

Eugene W. Pruitt Superintendent of Schools 

Duvall W. Sweadner Supervisor of High School 

Evelyn Davis Supervisor of Junior High Schools 

Mrs. Louise F. Thompson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Alice Love Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Warren R. Evans Supervisor of Health and Physical Education 

Virginia Klos Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Paul L. Hoffmaster Supervisor of Transportation 

♦Charles E. Henson Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Paul E. Fogle Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

GARRETT COUNTY 
Oakland 

Willard L. Hawkins Superintendent of Schools 

Foster D. Bittle Supervisor of High Schools 

Edwin W. Elias Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Caroline Wilson Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Oren T. Graser Supervisor of Maintenance 

John L. Fitzwater Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

HARFORD COUNTY 
Bel Air 

Charles W. Willis Superintendent of Schools 

Benjamin S. Carroll Assistant Superintendent 

Hazel L. Fisher Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Anne M. Noonan Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Howard B. Peters Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Dorothy M. Rowe Supervisor of High Schools 

C. Clark Jones Supervisor of High Schools 

James H. Clow, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

*Thomas J. Loughran Administrative Assistant 

Allen B. Amoss Administrative Assistant 

HOWARD COUNTY 
Elllcott City 

John E. Yingling Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Mary R. Hovet Supervisor of High Schools 

Frank B. Durigg Supervisor of Special Subjects and Maintenance 

Carmen C. Delaplane Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Morris L. Woodson Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Harry T. Murphy Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

KENT COUNTY 

Chestertown 

Reade W. Corr Superintendent of Schools 

Carey E. Lacey Supervisor of High Schools 

Louise Hepbron Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Sara B. Chambers Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Madeleine Fennell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

MONTGOMERY COUNTY 
Rockville 

Forbes H. Norris Superintendent of Schools 

James L. Prince Assistant Superintendent, Personnel and Administration 

Thomas W. Pyle Assistant Superintendent, Instructional Program 

George Menke Administrative Assistant, Director of Supplementary Services 

Mrs. Genevieve S. Blew Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Helen P. Bready Supervisor of High Schools 

Maud Arveson . Supervisor of High Schools 

George L. Osterwise Supervisor of High Schools 

* Part time 



7 



Name Position 
MONTGOMERY COU NTY-(Continued) 

Harold R. Packard Supervisor of High Schools 

Etheleen Daniel Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Agnes M. Drewry Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

William B. Evans Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Lillian L. Gore Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mary L. Grau Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Ruth S. Gue Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

*Mrs. Margaret T. Jones Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

John M. King Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lillian Klein Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Elsie Schurter Supervisory of Elementary Schools 

Clara G. Stratemeyer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Louise S. Walker Supervisor of Audio- Visual Education 

Mrs. Marjorie B. St. Clair Supervisor of Art 

William C. Feddeman Supervisor of Industrial Education and Adult Education 

Charles T. Horn Supervisor of Music 

Julia W. Watkins Supervisor of Home Arts 

Crescent J. Bride Supervisor of Physical Education 

Alice Robinson Supervisor of Library Services 

Brian M. Benson , Director of Finance 

Frank St. Clair, Jr Director of Supporting Services 

Mrs. Corelli David Supervisor of School Lunch 

Richard Ream Supervisor of Transportation 

Maxwell E. Burdette Director of Planning 

T. H. Owen Knight Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Mrs. Marian T. Tannhauser Supervisor of Special Education 

Otho Hawke Supervisor of Maintenance 

John T. Wise Director of Custodial Services 

PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY 
Upper Marlboro 

William S. Schmidt Superintendent of Schools 

George H. Robinson Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Thomas S. Gwynn, Jr Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

Rowannetta S. Allen Director of Instruction 

Flora Schroyer Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

John W. Heim Supervisor of Transportation 

Arthur E. Robinson Supervisor of Maintenance 

Lucile L. Lurry Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Dean Manifold Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Robert Binger Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Olin L. A dans, Jr Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Emma Bowman Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Eunice E. Burdette Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Anne Mildred Hoyle Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Rita Donovan Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elisabeth Kelly Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Elizabeth McMahon Supervisor of Elementary Education 

Margaret Beardsley Supervisor of Kindergartens 

Mrs. Mary Beth Wackwitz Supervisor of Art 

Mrs. Frances Hill Lynch Supervisor of Music 

Mary A. Thompson Supervisor of Health Education 

Vincent Holochwost Supervisor of Physical Education 

Ada M. Warrington Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mrs. Louise Bennett Supervisor of Libraries 

Elmer K. Zeller Supervisor of Vocational and Industrial Education 

M. Gladys Dickerson Supervisor of Home Economics and Adult Education 

Doswell E. Brooks Supervisor of Colored Schools 

William W. Hall ' Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Marian E. Lobdell Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

C. Elizabeth Reig Supervisor of Special Services 



QUEEN ANNE'S COUNTY 

Centreville 

Harry C. Rhodes Superintendent of Schools 

Jean R. Moser Supervisor of High Schools 

Mrs. Margaret S. Stack Supervisor of White Elementary Schools 

Alberta C. Browne Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Lola P. Brown Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

ST. MARY'S COUNTY 
Leonardtown 

Lettie M. Dent Superintendent of Schools 

E. Violette Young Supervisor of White Elementary Schools 

Thomas L. Smith Supervisor of High Schools 

Ralph S. Waters Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Margaret H. Burch Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Harriet H. Reeder Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

* Part time 

8 



Name Position 
SOMERSET COUNTY 
Princess Anne 

C. Allen Carlson Superintendent of Schools 

Mrs. Alice Mae C. Beauchamp , Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

John L. Bond Supervisor of Secondary Schools 

Kermit A. Cottman Supervisor of Colored Schools 

Charles O. Burns, Jr Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

TALBOT COUNTY 
Easton 

J. Willard Davis Superintendent of Schools 

M. Lillian Cheezum Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Artuhr R. Higginbottom Supervisor of High Schools 

*Kathleen A. Francis Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Virginia G. D. Darrow Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

WASHINGTON COUNTY 
Hagerstown 

William M. Brish Superintendent of Schools 

William C. Diehl Assistant Superintendent of Schools 

C. Paul Barnhart Administrative Assistant 

Wilbur S. Hoopengardner Director of Instruction 

Carl R. Beer Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Annilea H. Browne Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

M. Frances Grimes Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Rebekah B. Stonebraker Supervisor of High Schools 

Catherine L. Beachley Supervisor of Guidance and Research 

Miriam L. Hoffman Supervisor of Music 

Alfred C. Roth, Jr Supervisor of Industrial and Adult Education 

H. Edwin Semler Supervisor of Physical Education 

Mrs. Anormallee M. Way Supervisor of School Lunch Program 

Russell L. Kepler Supervisor of Maintenance 

V. Richard Martin Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Joseph H. Vance Supervisor of Finance 

Claude Brubeck Supervisor of Transportation 

WICOMICO COUNTY 
Salisbury 

James M. Bennett Superintendent of Schools 

Louise L. Mitchell Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Martha R. Jones Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Royd A. Mahaffey, Jr Supervisor of High Schools 

Marie A. Dashiell Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Sheldon B. Dawson Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

Branche H. Phillips, Jr Supervisor of Transportation 

WORCESTER COUNTY 
Snow Hall 

Paul D. Cooper Superintendent of Schools 

Paul S. Hyde D'ector of Instruction 

Alfred S. Hancock Supervisor of Instruction 

Myrtle Lee Vick Supervisor of Elementary Schools 

Mrs. Annie B. Downing Supervisor of Colored Elementary Schools 

Benjamin W. Nelson Supervisor of Maintenance and Transportation 

Wilbur A. Jones Supervisor of Pupil Personnel 

BALTIMORE CITY 
3 East Twenty-fifth Street, Baltimore 18 

John H. Fischer Superintendent of Public Instruction 

Mary A. Adams Assistant Superintendent of Elementary Education 

Houston R. Jackson Assistant Superintendent 

John W. Lewis Assistant Superintendent Business Management 

Edwin Stein Assistant Superintendent General Administration 

Charles W. Sylvester Assistant Superintendent Vocational Education 

J. Carey Taylor Assistant Superintendent Secondary Education 

Helen M. Stegman Administrative Assistant 

Thomas A. Van Sant Director of Adult Education 

Leon L. Winslow Director of Art Education 

George F. Smith, Jr Director of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Edith V. Walker Director of Elementary Education 

Elmon L. Vernier Director of Health and Physical Education 

Kenneth Hjelmervik Director of Music 

W. A. Maccubbin Director of Personnel 

Angela Broening Director of Publications 

Lome Woollatt Director of Research 

William E. Lehr Director of School Facilities 

* Part time 



9 



Name Position 
BALTIMORE CITY-(Continued) 

Arthur Lichtenstein Director of Special Services to Pupils 

Helen Herman Area Director 

Marion Johnson Area Director 

E. Romaine Jones Area Director 

Eleanor Shank ■ Area Director 

Laura M. Wells Area Director 

Albert G. Packard Assistant Director of Aptitude Testing 

Harry Bard Assistant Director of Curriculum Bureau 

Leona C. Buchwald Assistant Director of Guidance and Placement 

Harold B. Chapman Assistant Director of Research 

William M. K. Rawlings Supervisor of Adult Education 

L. Merle Smuck Supervisor of Audio-visual Education 

E. Duncan Hyde Supervisor of Business Education 

Forest L. Lawton Supervisor of Distributive Education 

H. Spiiman Burns Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

D wight S. Caskey Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Wallace C. Kirk Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Sol Levin Supervisor of Educational Supplies and Equipment 

Mrs. Nanette R. Blackiston Supervisor of Secondary Education 

Mrs. Emma G. Bright Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Rebecca E. Carroll Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

M. Catherine Cohee Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Elizabeth Fox Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Elizabeth Gilpin Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Thelma D. Jackson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Mrs. Winifred T. Kinn Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Lillian W. Stevenson Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Josephine T. Toro Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Virginia H. Young : Supervisor of Elementary Grades 

Helen Chambers Supervisor of English 

Mrs. Josie G. Smith Supervisor of English 

Helen Mixter Supervisor of Geography 

Robert Diggs Supervisor of Geography and Science 

Beulah P. Beale Supervisor of Handwriting 

Mrs. Lillian B. Davis Supervisor of Health Education 

D. C. Wharton Smith, M.D Supervisor of Health Services 

Mrs. Edythe A. Myers Supervisor of History 

Edna R. Carter Supervisor of History 

Nellie S. Buckey Supervisor of Home Economics 

Stanley J. Pawelek Supervisor of Industrial Arts Education 

Corwin H. Taylor Supervisor of Instrumental Music 

Anne L. Barlage Supervisor of Latin 

Marion B. Wiese Supervisor of Libraries 

Grover W. Norris Supervisor of Mathematics 

Samuel L. Taylor Supervisor of Mathematics 

Otto K. Schmied Supervisor of Modern Languages 

Mrs. Koma Stinchcomb Supervisor of Occupational and Shop Centers 

Mrs. Katherine Whiteside Taylor Supervisor of Parent Education 

Andrew T. Norgan Supervisor of Physical Education 

C. Elizabeth Armstrong Supervisor of School Social Work 

Elra M. Palmer Supervisor of Science 

Alexina Stidham Supervisor of Science 

Mrs. Lois T. Murray Supervisor of Special Education 

Marguerite L. Stem Supervisor of Special Education 

Olive A. Whildin Supervisor of Special Education 

Mrs. Sarah I. S. Williams Supervisor of Special Education 

James O. Proctor Supervisor of Vocational Education 

William T. Hucksoll Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 

Carl T. White Supervisor of Vocational Industrial Education 



10 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Letter of Transmittal 12 

Legislation Affecting Education 13 

Notes from the Minutes of the State Board of Education 20 

Administrative Divisions of the State Department of Education: 

Certification and Accreditation 34 

Instruction 41 

Library Extension 51 

Vocational Education 57 

Vocational Rehabilitation 63 

Dates of Opening and Closing Schools, Length of Session 66 

Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Public and Nonpublic Schools..... 68 

Number Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools 69 

Education for Handicapped Children, Schools for Atypical Children 72 

Births in Maryland 75 

Withdrawals in Public Schools 78 

Average Number Pupils Belonging 79 

Grade Enrollment 80 

Nonpromotions in Elementary Schools 86 

High School Graduates: Number, Occupations, Colleges Attended 88 

High School Enrollment: by Year and Subject 96 

High School Teachers 98 

Enrollment in Individual Subjects 99 

High School Failures and Withdrawals 112 

Teachers: by Summer School Attendance, Certification, Preparation, 

Resignations, Turnover, Source 118 

Number and Size of Schools 138 

Supervisory and Pupil Personnel Services 143 

Costs of Maryland Schools: 

Total, Per Cent from State 144 

Distribution of Tax Dollar 148 

Cost per Pupil 150 

Average Salaries 158 

Salaries 162 

Transportation 164 

Adult Education, Vocational Education 169 

School Lunch, School Milk 178 

Capital Outlay, Bonded Indebtedness, Value of School Property 181 

County Levies, Assessments, Tax Rates 185 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita 191 

Per Capita Income by States and by Year in Maryland 192 

Maryland State Teachers Colleges; Junior Colleges 194 

Contributions of Teachers to State Teachers' Retirement System 202 

Parent-Teacher Associations 203 

Baltimore City Summer Schools; High School Equivalence 204 

Vocational Rehabilitation 206 

Library Extension, Aid to School Libraries 208 

Financial Statements and Statistical Tables 211 

Index 262 



11 



Baltimore, Maryland 
January 1, 1956 

The Honorable Theodore R. McKeldin 
Government House 
Annapolis, Maryland 

Dear Governor McKeldin: 

In accordance with the provision of the laws of Maryland, 
I have the honor to present to you herewith, the eighty-ninth 
"annual report covering all operations of the State department of 
education and the support, conditions, progress and needs of educa- 
tion throughout the State' ' for the period beginning July 1, 1954, 
and ending June 30, 1955. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Thomas G. Pullen, Jr. 
Secretary-Treasurer 
State Board of Education 



12 



INDEX 
1955 Maryland Legislation 



Affecting Education 

Subject Chapter Bill 

Assessment of Stock in Business 716 H 214 

Annual Audit— Cecil County Board of Education 123 H 229 

Annual Audit— Harford County Board of Education 213 S 373 

Bids for School Construction — Baltimore County 37 H 69 

Biennial School Census 510 H 636 

511 H 637 

Board of Education — Prince George's County 367 H 413 

Bond Authorization 

Allegany County 167 H 531 

Anne Arundel County 205 S 198 

Baltimore City 2 S 29 

Caroline County 321 S 509 

Cecil County 223 S 475 

Prince George's County 373 H 477 

Somerset County 539 H 809 

Talbot County 64 S 259 

Washington County 392 H 635 

Wicomico County 305 S 446 

Worcester County 256 H 680 

Child Study Groups SR 47 

Coppin State Teachers College — Armory SJR 22 

Frederick Public Library 582 S 352 

General Construction Loan of 1955 266 S 218 

Handicapped Children SJR 2 

Handicapped Children — Allegany County HR 67 

Hood College— Scholarships 86 S 63 

One- Year Assessment Plan 116 H 131 

Peabody Institute— Scholarships 589 S 420 

Retired Teachers SR 52 

Retired Teachers— Allegany County 533 H 765 

Retirement Systems — Integration with Social Security SJR 9 

Retirement Systems — Rates of Interest 27 HI 

Scholarships HR 70 

School Buildings SR 54 

Social Security and State Employees 636 H 228 

Supplementary Pensions — Baltimore County 492 H 487 

Surplus Foods 385 H 614 

Teachers' Retirement System 272 S 255 

Teachers' Retirement System 598 S 515 

Teachers' Salaries— Allegany County 380 H 590 

Teachers' Salaries— Garrett County 599 S 516 

Temporary Use of Anne Arundel County School Buildings 372 H 456 

Tobacco Tax for Schools— Wicomico County 619 S 599 

Transportation of Nonpublic School Children — Harford County 112 H 75 

Transportation of Nonpublic School Children— Talbot County.. 403 H 699 

Use of Schools for Certain Purposes — Montgomery County 512 H 639 

Vocational Rehabilitation 513 H 643 

War Orphans— Education 274 S 273 

Workshop for the Blind— Vending Stands 5 H 18 

Workshops for the Blind 100 S 243 



13 



14 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



LEGISLATION AFFECTING EDUCATION ENACTED BY THE 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY OF MARYLAND 

Regular Session — January-March, 1955 

Legislation Having State- Wide Effect 

Assessment of Stock in Business 

Chapter 716, House Bill 214, repeals and re-enacts Section 14 of Article 81 re- 
lating to the assessment of stock in business. Such stock in Baltimore 
County is to be assessed at 75 per cent of fair value. Frederick County 
and the City of Frederick are added to the list of subdivisions which assess 
such stock at 60 per cent of fair value. That part of the law which directed 
stock assessment exemptions to be disregarded for computing Equalization 
and Incentive Fund payments was repealed. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Biennial School Census 

Chapters 510 and 511, House Bill 636 and House Bill 637, repeal Sections 24, 43, 
and 155 of Article 77, which made it mandatory for the counties and the 
City of Baltimore to take a biennial school census, and amend Section 64 of 
Article 77 to make the taking of such a census permissive instead of manda- 
tory. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Child Study Groups 

Senate Resolution 47 requests a State appropriation to certain Child Study 
Groups and Child Guidance Services affiliated v/ith the public schools. 

Coppin State Teachers College — Armory 

Senate Joint Resolution 22 requests the Board of Public Works to make available 
a site on the grounds of Coppin State Teachers College for the construction 
of an armory. 

General Construction Loan of 1955 

Chapter 266, Senate Bill 218, authorizes the creation of a State debt of $9,195,750, 
the proceeds of which will be used to construct, equip, and acquire land for 
necessary State buildings. Funds for certain capital improvements at the 
State teachers colleges are included in this Act. Effective date is June 1, 
1955. Following are the amounts allocated to each of the colleges: 



Bowie 

Construction of roads and walks $40,000 

Supplement for women's dormitory 30,000 

Total....- $70,000 

Frostburg 

Equipment for 2 dormitories $27,000 

Grading, etc 54,000 

Supplement for men's dormitory 47,500 

Supplement for women's dormitory 47,500 



Total $176,000 

Salisbury 

Equipment for library $35,000 

Acquisition of land 15,000 . 

Supplement for library 70,000 

Kquipment for demonstration school library 4,300 

Total $124,500 

Towson 

Acquisition of land $45,000 

Plans for women's dormitory 25,000 



Total $70,000 



Maryland State Department of Education 



15 



Handicapped Children 

Senate Joint Resolution 2 requests a special commission to be appointed by the 
Governor to study preschool training for handicapped children. 

Hood College — Scholarships 

Chapter 86, Senate Bill 63, adds Hood College to the number of those Maryland 
colleges empowered to grant State senatorial scholarships in the area of 
teacher preparation. Effective date is July 1, 1955. 

One- Year Assessment Plan 

Chapter 116, House Bill 131, repeals and re-enacts Section 2 of Chapter 69 of the 
Acts of 1954, with the provision that the Act shall take effect on July 1, 1955, 
instead of on July 1, 1956. By this provision, the so-called one-year assess- 
ment plan is brought into effect. Effective date is July 1, 1955. 

Peabody Institute — Scholarships 

Chapter 589, Senate Bill 420, adds Peabody Institute to the number of those 
Maryland institutions of higher learning empowered to grant State scholar- 
ships provided that the student give bond to the State that he will teach in 
the public schools of Maryland for at least two years. Effective date is 
July 1, 1955. 

Retirement Systems — Integration with Social Security 

Senate Joint Resolution 9 requests a study of the feasibility of integrating the 
Employees' and the Teachers' Retirement Systems with the Federal Old 
Age and Survivors Insurance System. 

Retirement Systems — Rates of Interest 

Chapter 27, House Bill 1, provides that the rate of interest allowed by the State 
Employees, the State Police, and the State Teachers Retirement Systems, 
shall be limited to a maximum of 4 per cent for members in service on or 
before June 30, 1955, and shall be limited to a maximum of 3 per cent for 
those persons becoming members on and after July 1, 1955. Effective date 
is July 1, 1955. 

Retired Teachers 

Senate Resolution 52 requests the Legislative Council to study the needs and 
financial status of the retired school teachers of the State. 

Scholarships 

House Resolution 70 requests the Legislative Council to study the possibility of 
improving the system of awarding scholarships through members of the 
General Assembly. 

School Buildings 

Senate Resolution 54 requests the Legislative Council to study the financing of 
public school facilities in this State. 

Social Security and State Employees 

Chapter 636, House Bill 228, permits employees of the State and of its political 
subdivisions, and including the members of the State Teachers Retirement 
System, to participate in the Federal Old Age and Survivors Insurance Sys- 
tem. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Surplus Foods 

Chapter 385, House Bill 614, authorizes the Governor to designate an agency 
or department of the State to accept surplus foods from the Federal govern- 
ment. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 272, Senate Bill 255, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, Sub- 
section (15) of Section 104 of Article 77. This Act re-defines the term 
"Average Final Compensation" which is used in calculating retirement 



16 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

benefits. Beginning July 31, 1955, "Average Final Compensation" shall 
mean the five (5) consecutive years of highest earnings instead of the ten (10) 
as formerly required. Effective date is July 31, 1955. 

Teachers' Retirement System 

Chapter 598, Senate Bill 515, adds subsection (9) to Section 109 of Article 77, 
repeals and re-enacts subsection (1) (d) and subsection (7) of Section 112. 
This Act permits a retired member to accept part-time employment in which 
all or part of the compensation comes from State funds and to increase 
voluntarily his deposits in the Annuity Savings Fund to the point where he 
will receive a retirement allowance not in excess of two-thirds of his average 
final compensation. Effective date is July 31, 1955. 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Chapter 513, House Bill 643, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments. Sections 
287 and 288 of Article 77, to authorize the State Board of Education to co- 
operate with the U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare in 
order to carry out the disability determination provisions of the Federal 
Social Security Act. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

War Orphans — Education 

Chapter 274, Senate Bill 273, amends Section 49(a) of Article 96 Y 2 to remove the 
time restriction on State aid for the education of the children of certain 
deceased veterans. The child of any member of the Armed Forces who was 
killed in action or who died as a result of such service after December 7, 1941, 
may qualify for the educational aid. The former law stated that death had 
to occur between December 7, 1941, and the end of the Korean hostilities. 
Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Workshop for the Blind — Vending Stands 

Chapter 5, House Bill 18, authorizes the Maryland Workshop for the Blind to 
contract for the operation of vending stands in privately-owned buildings or 
premises throughout the State. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Workshops for the Blind 

Chapter 100, Senate Bill 243, authorizes the location of workshops for the blind 
in parts of the State other than Baltimore [City. Effective date is June 1, 
1955. 

Local Legislation 
Annual Audit — Cecil County Board of Education 

Chapter 123, House Bill .229, adds Cecil County to those counties whose boards 
of education are required to submit to their county commissioners an annual 
report containing (1) a statement of the source and application of all funds 
received and expended and the balance in each account; (2) a statement show- 
ing the operating results, receipts, expenditures, and balances of the public 
schools. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Annual Audit — Harford County Board of Education 

Chapter 213, Senate Bill 373, adds Harford County to those counties whose 
boards of education are required to submit to their county commissioners an 
annual report containing (1) a statement of the source and application of all 
funds received and expended and the balance in each account; (2) a statement 
showing the operating results, receipts, expenditures, and balances of the 
public schools. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Bids for School Construction — Baltimore County 

Chapter 37, House Bill 69, increases from $1,000 to $5,000 the cost of any school 
building construction, supplies, or equipment which must be advertised for 
bids in Baltimore County. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



17 



Board of Education — Prince George's County 

Chapter 367, House Bill 413, repeals and re-enacts, with amendments, Section 12 
of Article 77 (The Public School Laws of Maryland — 1955), to raise from two 
to three the number of members of the Prince George's County Board of 
Education (7 members) who must belong to that political party which polled 
second highest number of votes in most recent gubernatorial election. Effec- 
tive date is June 1, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Allegany County 

Chapter 167, House Bill 531, authorizes the County Commissioners of Allegany 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $800,000 for the purpose of con- 
structing new schools and additions to existing ones. A specific schedule of 
the construction, repair, and addition work is included in the Act. Effective 
date is June 1, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Anne Arundel County 

Chapter 205, Senate Bill 198, authorizes the Anne Arundel County Board of 
Education with the approval of the County Commissioners of Anne Arundel 
County, to borrow an amount not to exceed $8,000,000 to finance the con- 
struction or extension of public schools. Effective date is June 1, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Baltimore City 

Chapter 2, Senate Bill 29, authorizes the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore to 
borrow an amount not to exceed $29,500,000 for the acquisition of land and 
for the construction of school facilities. Effective date is May 3, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Caroline County 

Chapter 321, Senate Bill 509, authorizes the County Commissioners of Caroline 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,600,000 to purchase property 
to construct thereupon a consolidated senior high school and to build a new 
Federalsburg School, or to erect additions to the existing school. Effective 
date: Referendum to be held in June, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Cecil County 

Chapter 223, Senate Bill 475, authorizes the County Commissioners of Cecil 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $2,000,000 for the purpose of 
constructing, extending, and equipping schools and for acquiring sites for 
such schools. Effective date is April 1, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Prince George's County 

Chapter 373, House Bill 477, authorizes the Board of Education and the Board 
of County Commissioners of Prince George's County to issue serial bonds in 
an amount not to exceed $10,000,000 for the purpose of acquiring land and 
constructing school facilities. Effective date is April 11, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Somerset County 

Chapter 539, House Bill 809, authorizes the County Commissioners of Somerset 
County to sell serial bonds in an amount not to exceed $850,000 for the pur- 
pose of constructing and equipping schools and for acquiring sites for such 
schools. Effective date is April 19, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Talbot County 

Chapter 64, Senate Bill 259, authorizes the County Commissioners of Talbot 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $1,000,000 for the purpose of 
constructing and extending schools and for acquiring sites for such schools. 
Effective date is May 1, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Washington County 

Chapter 392, House Bill 635, authorizes the County Commissioners of Washington 
County to borrow an amount not to exceed $8,000,000 for the purpose of 
constructing new schools. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 



18 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

Bond Authorization — Wicomico County 

Chapter 305, Senate Bill 446, authorizes the County Commissioners of Wicomico 
County to borrow the amount of $300,000 for the purpose of constructing 
and extending schools and for acquiring sites for such schools. Effective 
date is April 11, 1955. 

Bond Authorization — Worcester County 

Chapter 256, House Bill 680, authorizes the County Commissioners of Worcester 
County to sell serial bonds in an amount not to exceed $1,500,000 for the 
purpose of building and equipping two separate high schools, one in or near 
Pocomoke City, and the other in or near Snow Hill. Effective date is 
April 1, 1955. 

Frederick Public Library 

Chapter 582, Senate Bill 352, adds Section 195B to Article 77, which removes the 
C. Burr Artz Library of Frederick from the supervision of the State Superin- 
tendent of Schools and the Division of Library Extension. The C. Burr 
Artz Library shall continue to be entitled to benefits under Section 178 of 
Article 77. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 

Handicapped Children — Allegany County 

House Resolution 67 requests the establishment of facilities for the teaching 
and training of handicapped children in Allegany County. 

Retired Teachers — Allegany County 

Chapter 633, House Bill 765, empowers the Allegany County Board of County 
Commissioners to pay an annual pension of not less than $400 to certain 
former public school teachers not eligible to retire under the provisions of 
Chapter 447 of the Acts of 1920. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 

Supplementary Pensions — Baltimore County 

Chapter 492, House Bill 487, provides for certain supplementary pensions to be 
paid to those Baltimore County public school teachers who retired after 30 
years of creditable service because of physical disability. Effective date is 
May 1, 1956. 

Teachers' Salaries — Allegany County 

Chapter 380, House Bill 590, adds Section 102 (k) to Article 77 to authorize the 
Allegany County Board of Commissioners to increase the salaries of all 
teachers, principals, and administrative and supervisory personnel by $300 
for the school year 1955-1956. For the school year 1956-57 and continuing 
thereafter from year to year all such salaries shall be increased by $100. 
Effective date is April 11, 1955. 

Teachers' Salaries — Garrett County 

Chapter 599, Senate Bill 516, directs the County Commissioners of Garrett County 
to levy a lc a pack cigarette tax, the proceeds of which are to be used (1) to 
increase teachers' salaries and (2) for construction and maintenance of the 
school system. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 

Temporary Use of Anne Arundel County School Buildings 

Chapter 372, House Bill 456, authorizes the county school superintendent to permit 
the use of Anne Arundel County public school buildings for Sunday school 
purposes while the Sunday school buildings are undergoing repairs. Effec- 
tive date is May 1, 1955. 

Tobacco Tax for Schools— Wicomico County 

Chapter 619, Senate Bill 599, authorizes the County Commissioners of Wicomico 
County to levy certain taxes on retailers of tobacco products. The proceeds 
of these taxes are to be used solely for the purpose of constructing school 
buildings and/or for the retirement of bonded indebtedness incurred in public 
school construction. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 



Maryland State Department op Education 



19 



Transportation of Nonpublic School Children — Harford County 

Chapter 112, House Bill 75, provides that children attending schools in Harford 
County which do not receive State aid shall be entitled, under certain condi- 
tions, to transportation on the public school buses. Effective date is May 1, 
1955. 

Transportation of Nonpublic School Children — Talbot County 

Chapter 403, House Bill 699, provides that children attending schools in Talbot 
County which do not receive State aid shall be entitled, under certain condi- 
tions, to transportation on the public school buses. Effective date is May 1, 
1955. 

Use of Schools for Certain Purposes — Montgomery County 

Chapter 512, House Bill 639, authorizes the Montgomery County Board of Educa- 
tion to allow the use of public school buildings for religious purposes, partisan 
political meetings, and public elections. Effective date is May 1, 1955. 



20 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



NOTES FROM THE MINUTES OF THE STATE BOARD 
OF EDUCATION 

August 25, 1954 

The State Board passed the following resolution on Mr. 
Richard Marcus, a member of the State Board of Education from 
November, 1953, to August, 1954: 

Resolution On Mr. Richard Marcus 

The State Board of Education wishes to express its sorrow at the 
death of Mr. Richard Marcus, on August 8, 1954. 

Mr. Marcus was a graduate of the Forest Park High School and had 
attended Washington and Lee University and the Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. A very successful industrialist, he took an active interest in 
civic and philanthropic movements; supported the establishment of 
Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts; was a member of the 
Boards of Sinai Hospital, the Associated Jewish Charities, and the Jewish 
Welfare Fund; and was an officer or a member of several clubs. 

Although Mr. Marcus had been a member of the State Board of 
Education only since the late fall of 1953, his keen interest in public 
education, his sound judgment, and his affable personality impressed all 
his colleagues on the Board. They had looked forward with pleasure 
to continued association with him and feel that the Maryland public 
school system has indeed lost a friend 

After hearing from representatives of the Baltimore Symphony 
Orchestra Association, the Board approved a plan to make available 
to the county schools thirteen broadcasts by the Orchestra subject 
to the following conditions: that the use of the program be volun- 
tary and be subject to the approval of the respective county boards 
of education; that the content of the programs be under the control 
of the State Board of Education; that the sponsors be acceptable; 
that the wording of the commercials used be satisfactory to the 
Superintendent; and that the cost be met entirely by the sponsoring 
firms. A similar arrangement had already been made with the 
Orchestra by the Board of School Commissioners of Baltimore City. 

At the Board's request, Mr. W. Giles Parker, Assistant At- 
torney General, stated that the Attorney General's office had studied 
the per curiam opinions handed down by the Supreme Court after 
the opinion on segregation. It was the feeling of that office that 
the per curiam opinions did not affect segregation in any of the 
Maryland schools. Some of the cases were remanded after con- 
sideration in the light of present situations and in some instances 
the original conditions no longer obtained. There is a separate 
law in Maryland about the teachers colleges and this law specifically 
enjoins the State Board of Education to operate a teachers college 
or colleges for Negro students. The State Board of Education 
has no authority to take action toward desegregation at the teachers 
colleges until the Supreme Court issues a decree on the subject. 
Until that time the State law is the governing statute. 

Mr. Parker also stated that Baltimore City operates under a 
charter which gives it a certain professional autonomy but that he 



Maryland State Department of Education 21 

thought the City Solicitor had anticipated the Supreme Court by 
his decision. 

Dr. Pullen informed the Board that he was working with six 
institutions of higher learning in Maryland, in the hope of being 
able to approve elementary education programs which the colleges 
plan to offer. All of them have expressed their willingness to comply, 
with minor exceptions, with the recommendations of the special 
committees engaged to advise the State Superintendent. 

The Board approved the proposed revision of course require- 
ments in the State teachers colleges. The revisions cover the fol- 
lowing points: 

A. That the minimum of 128 semester hours required for graduation be distributed 
as follows: 



1. General education 65 Semester hours 

English 14 Semester hours 

Social Sciences 18 Semester hours 

Science 12 Semester hours 

Music 4 Semester hours 

Art 4 Semester hours 

Health 3 Semester hours 

Physical Education 4 Semester hours 

Mathematics 3 Semester hours 

Psychology 3 Semester hours 

Professional Education (Including Student 

Teaching) 35 Semester hours 

Electives 28 Semester hours 



B. That ordinarily not more than approximately one-half of the 28 semester 
hours in electives be used for study in any one field. That the remaining 14 
semester hours in electives be available for the development of a well-rounded 
program. 

C. That each college have autonomy within the above framework as regards the 
development of this program. 

The Board approved the report of the State Committee on 
Foreign Languages, including the suggestion that further study and 
exploration of the entire language area be carried out. Such ex- 
ploration may be done in various ways, including experimentation, 
setting up certain pilot schools, summer workshop programs, or as 
projects of various subcommittees of the State Committee on 
Foreign Languages. The work of these various exploratory groups 
may well center upon both the content and the procedures at the 
different grade levels of the elementary, junior high, and senior 
high school. 

Approval was given by the Board of the budgets for the State 
Department of Education and for the State teachers colleges after 
they had been reviewed by Dr. Zimmerman. 

The recommendation of the Department of Budget and Pro- 
curement to include a request in the State Budget for a business 
manager to work with the Teachers Colleges was approved by the 
Board. 



22 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



The Board approved certain recommendations with regard to 
bank accounts under the jurisdiction of the State Board of Edu- 
cation. Included in this approval was the following provision: 

That the State Board should review annually all the bank ac- 
counts maintained by the State Department of Education, including 
the names of the accounts, banks involved, and the authorized 
signers, and that information on these points be included in the 
minutes. 

November 24, 1954 

Mrs. Richard Marcus was welcomed as a new member of the 
State Board of Education. 

Dr. Zimmerman presented a consolidated summary of the 
State Department budget (State Department, public schools, teach- 
ers colleges) for 1955-56. He reviewed the legal basis for the funds 
in the public school budget and called attention to some of the in- 
formation required in estimating these funds, i.e., prediction of 
enrollments, number of teachers, salaries to teachers, and assess- 
ments. Approval was given by the Board to the entire budget. 

Plans were announced to send to Board members prior to each 
regular meeting a report of the preceding fiscal quarter on expendi- 
tures of the State Department of Education including all funds dis- 
tributed to local units. In discussing the quarterly report, Mr. 
William L. Barall, Supervisor of Finance, explained that the De- 
partment handles very little actual money. The Department has 
a regular revolving fund used for expense accounts, Board expenses, 
and petty cash. 

The Board was advised that the United States Department of 
Agriculture had allocated $553,276 to Maryland for the Special 
Milk Program. The plan of operation for this program as well as 
the commitments, and the contracts between the Commodity 
Credit Corporation and the State Department of Education and 
between the local school boards and the Department were approved 
by the Board. 

The recommendation of the School Superintendents (meeting — 
September 20, 1954) that the State Department should not con- 
tinue to distribute surplus property available from the Federal 
Government was approved by the Board. The Assistant Supervisor 
who has been working in this field on a part-time basis will con- 
tinue in the School Lunch Program (Surplus Commodities) and in 
addition will work with the Special Milk Program. 

The State Superintendent reported that the Assistant Attorney 
General has ruled that By-law 23, requiring medical examination 
of teachers, is void, as it assumes certain rights that do not belong 
to the State Board of Education. This by-law requires that "Be- 
fore any regular Maryland certificate is issued to a public school 
teacher or other school official, the applicant shall undergo a special 
medical examination by one of the county physicians especially 



Maryland State Department of Education 23 

appointed for this work and the report of the physician shall be 
accepted by the Medical Board of the Teachers' Retirement Sys- 
tem." 

Since the medical examination is not required for the emergency 
certificate, and since, according to Section 136 of Article 77 of the 
1951 edition of the Annotated Code, "at the opening of each annual 
term teachers must furnish a health certificate from a registered 
physician, addressed to the Superintendent of Schools, certifying 
that they are not suffering from tuberculosis or other communicable 
disease," it is believed unnecessary to require pre-examination of 
teachers for any certificates. 

The State Superintendent planned to confer with the State 
Department of Health and the school superintendents on the ad- 
visability of a by-law strengthening the requirement for the annual 
medical examination of teachers. A report will be made to the Board 
later. 

The Board adopted the revisions of By-law 12, Subsection III, 
Qualifications for School-bus Drivers, as proposed by the superin- 
tendents of schools: 

1. Must be not less than twenty-one years of age and not more 
than sixty-five years of age. This regulation shall take effect 
on September 1, 1955; however, any school-bus driver under 
contract at this date may continue in service until age 70 unless 
circumstances render him incapable of performing his duties 
as a school-bus driver in a satisfactory manner. 

2. All school-bus drivers 65 years of age or over shall be required 
to take annually a road test for school-bus drivers, as prepared 
and administered by the State Department of Motor Vehicles. 

It was pointed out that the Attorney General had approved the 
revision of By-law 12; also that any county board of education 
may adopt a higher minimum standard by local regulation. 

Dr. Pullen stated that Governor McKeldin had received from 
President Eisenhower an invitation to participate in the education 
program of the U. S. Department of Health, Education, and Wel- 
fare, offering an appropriation of $10,000 to aid in calling State 
meetings of interested citizens. The Governor accepted the invita- 
tion and appointed the State Superintendent of Schools as Chairman 
of the Maryland conference and as the proper official to apply for 
the funds allotted and to be responsible for expenditures authorized 
by Public Law 530, 83rd Congress. 

It was stated that the required form had been filed for the 
appropriation and that plans had been made for a preliminary meet- 
ing with several members of the Department and school people in 
the State to develop a program for the State conference. The 
Board approved this action. 

Dr. Pullen called the attention of the Board to the brief sub- 
mitted to the Supreme Court of the United States by the Attorney 



24 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



General, the Report of the Superintendents' Committee on Segrega- 
tion, the Resolutions of the Maryland Congress of Parents and 
Teachers and the Maryland State Teachers' Association, and the 
West River Proclamation on Segregation. He commented that he 
felt that the school people of Maryland would abide by the spirit 
of the Supreme Court decision and would work out the problems of 
desegregation in the best way possible. 

The Board approved the recommendation by the Superintendent 
that the new auditorium-gymnasium which is being erected at the 
State Teachers College at Frostburg be named Compton Hall, in 
honor of Miss Lillian C. Compton who, on December 12, 1954, re- 
tired as president of the College. (Board minutes May 26, 1954.) 

The Board approved the appointment of Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, 
Dean of the College of Education of the University of Maryland, 
as President of the State Teachers College at Salisbury as of July 1, 
1955. (Prior to becoming Dean of Education at the University 
of Maryland, Dr. Devilbiss had served the public schools of Mary- 
land as a teacher, principal, and as Supervisor of High Schools 
and of Teacher and Higher Education at the State Department of 
Education.) 

February 23, 1955 

At the Board's request, Mr. Harrison L. Winter, Deputy 
Attorney General, reviewed the pending suit against the Cecil 
County Board of Education and the Commanding Officer at the 
Naval Training Center at Bainbridge to require desegregation in 
the school which occupies rented quarters on the Base. 

The attorney for the Cecil County Board of Education has 
argued that the State Board and the State Department should be 
parties to the suit since in signing the contract and operating a 
segregated school, the local board was carrying out the policy of 
the State Board of Education and the directive of the State Superin- 
tendent who acted, upon the advice of the State Law Department. 

Mr. Winter pointed out that certain of the administrative and 
professional responsibilities of the State Superintendent are imposed 
upon him directly by the Legislature and that in carrying out these 
directives he is not the agent of the State Board of Education but is 
under a mandate from the Legislature. The approval of the con- 
tracts is one of the duties imposed by the Legislature. The State 
Board of Education has no responsibility in the matter. 

Dr. Pullen stated that in his opinion the problem was simply 
one of the validity of a contract for the rental of a building on the 
station by the Cecil County Board of Education. 

The Board voted not to become a party to the suit. It did 
point out, however, that a moral obligation was involved as the State 
Superintendent had refused to approve the contract on the basis of 
the Board's policy. The Board advised the State Superintendent 
to request the Attorney General to intervene in the suit on behalf 



Maryland State Department of Education 



25 



of the State Superintendent of Schools as he technically had ap- 
proved the contract for the lease of the building. 

The State Superintendent reported that the Attorney General 
has given a formal written opinion advising the repeal in its entirety 
of By-law 23 dealing with the medical examinations of teachers and 
substituting, if desired, a new one in appropriate terms that con- 
form with the present situation, i.e., strengthening of the law re- 
quiring annual medical examinations of teachers. 

Dr. Zimmerman reviewed the State School Budget as it had 
been presented to the Legislature and indicated where cuts had 
been made. The fiscal authorities had not included in the Budget 
the original requests of the State Board of Education. The Board 
last year had directed the Superintendent to ask the fiscal authorities 
and the Legislature to include in the Budget the requests as well as 
the allowance. 

In answer to the question on what the Board was doing to en- 
courage local libraries, it was explained that members of the Library 
Extension Division of the State Department of Education work 
with local citizens who are interested in starting libraries. The 
Division also lends to new libraries a nucleus of books with which 
to begin operating. One deterrent to the operation of libraries in 
small counties is that two cents on the tax rate is not sufficient 
(along with State Aid) for the support of a library. Some of the 
poorer counties have not felt themselves justified in imposing a 
higher tax for this purpose. 

The Board was advised that aid to junior colleges has been in- 
creased from $100 to $150 (final budget allowance — $125) per full- 
time student. The general plan has been to take care of the costs 
of public junior colleges through approximately equal contributions 
by the State, the local board of education, and the students. 

The Board was also advised that the food budget at the four 
State teachers colleges which have boarding students, provides the 
same proportionate amounts as formerly, 76 cents a day per student 
for raw food. A study sponsored by the State Board indicated that 
91 cents was necessary for an adequate diet at Towson and at 
Bowie, and because of higher transportation costs, 98 cents at Frost- 
burg and at Salisbury. The Board directed Dr. Pullen to appear 
before the Legislative Committees concerning the inadequate allow- 
ance for food at the teachers colleges. 

The State Superintendent reported that, at the suggestion of 
the Board, he had checked with the local superintendents and had 
found that periodic financial reports are submitted to the local 
boards of education but that monthly statements are not made in 
every county. He had recommended that the superintendents follow 
the policy of submitting financial reports to the boards at least at 
the end of each quarter. 



26 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Dr. Pullen informed the Board that as Chairman of the State 
Commission on the White House Conference he had submitted to 
the Governor the names of a number of people whose appointments 
to the Planning Committee he has recommended. The group will 
meet soon and will plan the State meetings, which will take place 
either before July or early in the fall. The Maryland Conference 
will discuss the following topics: 

1. What should our schools accomplish? 

2. How can we get enough good teachers and hold them? 

3. How can we get school facilities? 

4. How can we pay for our schools? 

5. How can we get a broader interest in our schools? 

The Board was invited to the meeting of the high school 
principals on April 29 and 30, at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. The 
speakers for this meeting include Dr. Harold Taylor, President of 
Sarah Lawrence College, speaking on the subject "Who Should 
Go to College," and Dr. T. M. Stinnett, Executive Secretary, Na- 
tional Commission on Teacher Education and Professional Stand- 
ards, speaking on "Meeting the Growing Needs for Teachers." 

The State Superintendent announced a superintendents' con- 
ference on school construction to be held in May. A similar con- 
ference which had taken place just after the close of the war and 
in which architects had participated had resulted in a substantial 
appropriation for school plans and an early start on the postwar 
building program with a consequent saving of millions of dollars. 

Announcement was made of a curriculum workship to be held 
in June in which the group will review the curriculum program in 
the public schools since 1945 and will make plans for further pro- 
gress. 

The Board passed the following resolutions on Dr. J. D. Black- 
well, President of the State Teachers College at Salisbury, and Dr. 
T. J. Caruthers, Director of Teacher Education at the same institu- 
tion. 

Resolution On Dr. Jefferson Davis Blackwell 

As Dr. J. D. Blackwell retires from his position as President of the 
State Teachers College at Salisbury, the State Board of Education wishes 
to express its appreciation of his zealous service to public education in 
Maryland. 

Dr. Blackwell graduated in agriculture from the University of Mis- 
souri in 1914; qualified for his master's degree and a diploma as superin- 
tendent of schools at Teachers College, Columbia University, in 1923; 
and received his doctor's degree from Johns Hopkins University in 1929. 

Beginning his teaching career in the public schools of Missouri, Dr. 
Blackwell afterwards taught successively at the State Teachers College, 
Warrensburg, Missouri, and at the Agricultural and Mechanical College 
of Texas. He then became Director of Vocational Education in Texas 
and, later, Assistant Director of Vocational Education in Pennsylvania. 
In 1923 he was appointed Director of Vocational Education in Maryland 



Maryland State Department of Education 27 

and in the spring of 1935 assumed the presidency of the State Teachers 
College at Salisbury. 

Dr. Blackwell always has devoted himself enthusiastically to the 
responsibilities he has undertaken. When he went to Salisbury the State 
Teachers Colleges were in the process of lengthening the course for the 
preparation of elementary school teachers to include a fourth year, culmi- 
nating with bachelor's degree. Six years later, the War period brought 
its special problems. In 1935 a junior college division was established 
at the College and somewhat later a long-term building program was 
begun. The enrollment in the College has increased from slightly more 
than one hundred students to nearly four hundred fifty full- and part- 
time students. There are now a new dormitory for men and a new 
demonstration school. Additional land and buildings have been acquired 
and one of the buildings is being prepared as a residence for the College 
president. 

During Dr. Blackwell's incumbency the College has been approved 
by the American Association of Colleges of Teacher Education and is to 
be evaluated this year by the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Secondary Schools. 

Dr. Blackwell has played an active role in the community and has 
maintained contacts with State and national professional organizations. 

The best wishes of the Board go with Dr. Blackwell as he retires from 
his post as President of the College. 



Resolution On Dr. Thomas Jefferson Caruthers 

On the occasion of the retirement of Dr. Thomas Jefferson Caruthers 
as Director of Teacher Education at the State Teachers College at Salis- 
bury, the Board of Education takes this opportunity to thank Dr. 
Caruthers for his effective service at the College. 

Dr. Caruthers qualified for the degree of Bachelor of Pedagogy at 
the Missouri Normal School in 1908 and for the Bachelor of Science De- 
gree at the Missouri State Teachers College in 1920. In 1925 he received 
the master's degree from Teachers College, Columbia University, and 
in 1939 the doctor of education degree from New York University. 
For some years he was a teacher or principal or head of the department 
of mathematics in several high schools in Missouri, served for a period 
as a county superintendent of schools, and from 1925 to 1934 was Super- 
visor of Student Teaching at what was then the State Normal School at 
Salisbury. For part of 1934-35 he was acting principal of the school and 
since 1935 has been Director of Teacher Education at the College. 

Dr. Caruthers has been a member of various State and national pro- 
fessional associations and in 1937 served as chairman of the Educational 
Progress Committee on the State Teachers' Association. 

With devotion to the cause of public education and with a contagious 
enthusiasm for teaching, Dr. Caruthers has made a noteworthy contribu- 
tion to Maryland schools during his many years as a member of the 
faculty of the State Teachers College at Salisbury. May he enjoy the 
well-deserved leisure which soon will be his! The best wishes of the 
Board go with him in his retirement. 



May 25, 1955 

At the annual organization meeting of the Board, Mr. Wendell 
D. Allen and Mr. Jerome Framptom were re-elected President and 
Vice-president, respectively, of the State Board of Education. 



28 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

The Board was advised of the following action of the 1955 
General Assembly affecting education in the State budget: 

1. Aid for junior colleges was reduced from the requested $150 to $125 
per student. 

2. As a result of the passage of a bill requiring real estate assessments 
on an annual basis, equalization aid was reduced by $562,029 and 
incentive fund aid by $80,262. This reduction was made with the 
approval of the State Department of Education. 

3. Hood College was allowed $47,500 this year for scholarships for 
students preparing for public school teaching; next year the amount 
will be doubled. There will be available for the coming year one 
scholarship for each legislative district. The Legislature approved 
scholarships to the Peabody Institute for students preparing for the 
teaching of music, but no money for this purpose will be available 
until the school session 1956-57. 

4. The appropriation for the Teachers' Retirement System was in- 
creased by $280,145 to cover the increased expenses due to the 
change in the law providing that the average final compensation 
shall mean the five consecutive years of highest earnings instead of 
the ten such years. 

The Board approved the plan to request the Adult Education 
Board of the American Library Association for a grant to conduct 
the library-community project of the study of basic American 
documents in the program known as "Our American Heritage." 

The following resolution was passed by the Board on the OASI 
(Old Age Survivors' Insurance) Program: 

RESOLVED that the Board comply with the designation by the 
Governor of Maryland that the Board of Education, Division of Voca- 
tional Rehabilitation, be the agency to carry out the OASI Program 
pursuant to the Act of Congress passed in 1954; that the Board under- 
stands that the expenses attached thereto will be paid by the Federal 
Governmentj that Dr. Pullen and his assistants are authorized to carry 
out the details of the program by and with the advice of the Attorney 
General; and that Dr. Pullen is authorized to sign the necessary con- 
tracts with the Federal Government. 

The Congressional amendment to the Social Security law freezes 
the individual's Old Age and Survivors' Insurance status during ex- 
tended total disability. The cases of the disabled persons will be 
referred to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation for appropriate 
vocational rehabilitation services to the end that as many as possible 
of these persons may be restored to gainful work. The Division 
will be asked to determine dates of disability alleged to have begun 
after December 31, 1953. The cost of these services will be borne 
by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare of the 
Federal Government. 

Dr. Pullen reported that a Planning Committee of approxi- 
mately sixty people had met at the Lord Baltimore Hotel on April 
15, 1955, to arrange the State meeting which is to be held on June 
24 and 25, in preparation for the November, 1955, White House 
Conference on Education. Between four and five hundred people 



Maryland State Department of Education 



29 



will be invited to the June Conference, which will discuss the sub- 
jects suggested by the White House Conference Committee, except 
the topic of School Organization. The Maryland school organiza- 
tion is generally thought to be unusually satisfactory. Only twenty 
people from Maryland will be invited to the White House Con- 
ference. These are to be chosen by a group consisting of two mem- 
bers from each subcommittee of the Planning Committee. 

The Board approved the following changes in By-law 11 relating 
to Tuition to Adjoining Counties: 



Present 

Tuition charges shall be 60 per 
cent of the average State cost, ex- 
clusive of general control and 
capital outlay, for respective types 
of schools for the preceding school 
year, provided no tuition charges 
shall be collected by an Equaliza- 
tion Fund County since such 
costs are covered in the Equaliza- 
Fund computation. 



Present 

Capital outlay charges for every 
county shall be $15 additional per 
child for elementary pupils and 
$20 per child for high school pupils. 
This shall be budgeted under 
"tuition." 



Approved 

1. Tuition charges shall be 60 per 
cent of the average State cost for 
current expenses, exclusive of gen- 
eral control and capital outlay, for 
respective types of schools for the 
preceding school year, provided 
that a county receiving State 
Equalization Aid shall make no 
tuition charge as such, but allow- 
ance shall be made for such coun- 
ty's average per pupil cost above 
the State minimum cost in making 
the Equalization Fund computa- 
tion. 

Approved 

2. Capital outlay charges for every 
county shall be $30 additional per 
elementary pupil and $50 addi- 
tional per high school pupil less 
the per pupil amount received from 
the State Incentive Fund on ac- 
count of such nonresident pupils. 



Approval was given by the Board to the following leaves of 
absence: Dr. W. Bird Terwilliger, Supervisor of Guidance and 
Placement, in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, for a three- 
weeks leave to conduct a training course in Vocational Rehabilitation 
at the University of Florida and Mr. C. William Anthony, Assistant 
Supervisor of Research, in the Division of Finance and Research, a 
leave up to four months to serve on a subcommittee of the White 
House Conference on Education to prepare resource material for 
the White House Conference. 



June 22, 1955 

The Board passed the following resolution concerning By-law 
55 (formerly By-law 75) on the rating of emergency teachers: 

RESOLVED that in view of the fact that the Board changed the 
date when By-law 55 should go into effect, a superintendent may at his 
discretion accept six semester hours of appropriate summer school work 
completed in 1953 as justifying rating an emergency certificate first class 
for the school year 1955-56. 



s 



30 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Approval was given by the Board to the minimum requirements 
and the uniform form for the doctor's report on the annual examina- 
tion of school bus drivers. The minimum requirements are as 
follows: 

(a) Mental and physical condition: 

(1) No loss of foot, leg, hand, or arm 

(2) No mental, nervous, organic, or functional disease, likely to 
interfere with safe driving 

(3) No loss of fingers, impairment of use of foot, leg, fingers, hand, 
or arm, or other structural defect or limitation, likely to inter- 
fere with safe driving 

(b) Eyesight: Visual acuity of at least 20/40 (Snellen) in each eye 
either without glasses or by correction with glasses; form field of 
vision in the horizontal meridian shall not be less than a total of 
140 degrees; ability to distinguish colors, red, green, and yellow; 
drivers requiring correction by glasses shall wear properly pre- 
scribed glass at all times when driving. 

(c) Hearing: Hearing shall not be less than 10/20 in the better ear, 
for conversational tones, without a hearing aid. 

(d) Liquor, narcotics, and drugs: Shall not be addicted to the use of 
narcotics or habit-forming drugs, or the excessive use of alcoholic 
beverages or liquors. 

The Board was invited to the Maryland Conference on Educa- 
tion, to be held on June 24 and 25, in preparation for the White 
House Conference on Education scheduled for November, 1955. 

At the Board's request, Dr. Pullen reviewed the history of the 
actions of the State Board of Education and of the State Superin- 
tendent with regard to the opinion of the Supreme Court on segrega- 
tion. (Opinion passed on May 17, 1954; decree issued on May 31, 
1955) 

On May 26, 1954, the State Board passed a resolution expressing 
the Board's acceptance of the decision of the Supreme Court, at 
the same time stating that, upon the advice of the Attorney General, 
the Board should wait for the decree of the Supreme Court before 
taking action. 

Upon the request of the former Attorney General, Mr. Edward 
D. Rollins, and his deputy, Mr. W. Giles Parker, Dr. Pullen ap- 
pointed a committee of superintendents to prepare suggestions for a 
brief which the Attorney General was requested to present to the 
Supreme Court in October, 1954, though the hearing was later post- 
poned several times. Among the recommendations of the com- 
mittee was one that each county appoint committees of citizens of 
both races to advise the county boards how to proceed in integrating 
the schools. In the meantime Dr. Pullen has met with a committee 
of colored citizens and also with the superintendents to discuss the 
problems and has attended meetings of the county boards of educa- 
tion at which these problems were discussed. 

When the Supreme Court gave its decree on May 31, 1955, at 
the request of the press and television, Dr. Pullen immediately 



Maryland State Department of Education 



31 



made statements reiterating the position of the State Board of 
Education. He conferred with the President of the Board and the 
two agreed to call a special meeting on June 21, 22, or 23. The 
reason for setting the date at the time indicated was that it was im- 
portant to give the Attorney General time to interpret the decree. 
Dr. Pullen had talked the matter over with Mr. Harrison L. Winter, 
Deputy Attorney-General, later held a conference with Attorney 
General C. Ferdinand Sybert and Mr. Winter, and held a special 
meeting of the superintendents, which was open to the public. The 
superintendents were invited to raise legal and administrative ques- 
tions both at the meeting and subsequently. There is now a con- 
siderable number of these questions which will be carefully studied 
and answered, insofar as answers can be given. 

Dr. Pullen has met also with the presidents of the Teachers 
Colleges and discussed integration in these institutions. 

The Attorney General has recently given a formal opinion re- 
garding the decree of the Supreme Court. This opinion is as 
follows: 

June 20, 1955 

Dear Dr. Pullen: 

You have asked us to advise you formally of our views with respect 
to the legal effect of the decision of the Supreme Court, and particularly 
of its opinion and decree of May 31, 1955, in Brown, et al. v. Board of 
Education of Topeka, et al. In the connection, you state in your letter 
in reference to our earlier oral conferences: "* * * As I understand your 
position, by virtue of the decree all constitutional and legislative acts 
requiring segregation in the State of Maryland are a nullity, and further, 
it is legally incumbent upon the school authorities of the State and local 
school systems 'to make a prompt and reasonable start toward full com- 
pliance' with the ruling of the Supreme Court on May 17, 1954." 

As is obvious from your statement, the Supreme Court rendered its 
first opinion in the Brown, et al., cases on May 17, 1954, and while it 
then held that racial discrimination in public education is unconstitu- 
tional, it deferred final action on the cases pending further argument on 
certain specific questions having to do with the form of decree which 
the Court should enter. In its second opinion, rendered May 31, 1955, the 
Court took final action on the judgment under review and remanded the 
cases to the Courts of origin to take such proceedings and enter such 
orders and decrees as would be consistent with the supplemental views 
expressed in the May 31, 1955 opinion. 

In its May 31, 1955 opinion, the Court stated at the outset: 

"These cases were decided on May 17, 1954. The opinions of that 
date, declaring the fundamental principle that racial discrimination in 
public education is unconstitutional are incorporated herein by reference. 
All provisions of federal, state, or local law requiring or permitting such 
discrimination must yield to this principle. There remains for considera- 
tion the manner in which relief is to be accorded." (Italics supplied.) 

We believe that the two opinions of the Supreme Court in the Brown, 
et al., cases mean just what they say, namely, that "All provisions of 
federal, state, or local law requiring or permitting such discrimination 
(racial discrimination) must yield * * *" to the principle that such dis- 
crimination in public education is unconstitutional. It would necessarily 
follow that, since the Constitution of the United States is the supreme law 
of the land, all constitutional and legislative acts of Maryland requiring 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

segregation in the public schools in the State of Maryland are uncon- 
stitutional, and hence must be treated as nullities. 

In its opinion of May 31, 1955, the Supreme Court directed the 
United States District Courts to require "* * * that the defendants make 
a prompt and reasonable start toward full compliance with our May 17, 
1954 ruling." It is true that this statement was made with respect to five 
consolidated cases in which neither the State of Maryland nor any admini- 
trative body or officer thereof was a party, although the State did parti- 
cipate in the argument of the case as amicus curiae. It might be argued 
that since the State of Maryland was not technically a party, the direction 
of the Supreme Court is not yet applicable to the State of Maryland, 
and that such direction would not be applicable until such time as suit is 
filed against the State or some educational official and a final order mak- 
ing the direction applicable entered in such suit. 

This argument to our mind confounds what is the clear state of the 
law and the nature of the relief which may be afforded in the event that 
there is not full compliance with the law. Obviously, in the event that 
there is a refusal to comply with the law, the mechanics of the relief 
might be different in the case of the State of Maryland from that granted 
in the case of one of the other States which was a defendant in one of the 
five consolidated cases in which the Supreme Court acted. However, the 
law with respect to public education as laid down by the Supreme Court is 
crystal clear, and we do not believe that differences in the mechanics of 
obtaining relief can limit in any sense the legal compulsion presently ex- 
isting on the appropriate school authorities of the State of Maryland to 
make "* * * a prompt and reasonable start" toward the ultimate elimi- 
nation of racial discrimination in public education. 

Very truly yours, 

(Signed) C. FERDINAND SYBERT 
Attorney General 

(Signed) HARRISON L. WINTER 
Deputy Attorney General 

The State Board adopted the following resolution: 

June 22, 1955 



JOINT RESOLUTION OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION OF MARYLAND AND THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES OF THE STATE TEACHERS COLLEGES 
OF MARYLAND 

(The members of the State Board of Education and 
the State Superintendent of Schools comprise the 
Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges.) 

WHEREAS, The Supreme Court of the United States passed its 
final judgment and decree on May 31, 1955, in the consolidated group 
of public school cases, determining the procedure to put into effect the 
Court's opinion of May 17, 1954, that the 14th Amendment of the Con- 
stitution of the United States, prohibiting any State from denying to 
any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws, is no 
longer satisfied by the former doctrine of separate but equal public 
school facilities, but now, on the contrary, prohibits any State from requir- 
ing or permitting racial discrimination in public education; and 

WHEREAS, the Attorney General of Maryland has advised that the 
final decision of the Supreme Court is now the law of the land and is 
automatically binding upon the public school system of Maryland and 
upon the several local school officials throughout the State, and that 



Maryland State Department of Education 

the State Courts and the Federal Courts, should cases arise, are bound 
by the decision of the Supreme Court to recognize and give full force 
and effect thereto in the light of the equitable procedural considerations 
announced by the Supreme Court, 

Therefore RESOLVED by The State Board of Education of Mary- 
land and The Board of Trustees of the State Teachers Colleges of Mary- 
land, in joint session, pursuant to the law of the land and pursuant to 
the procedural steps announced by The Supreme Court of the United 
States, and pursuant to the authority vested in these Boards by the 
laws of The State of Maryland, that the following are adopted as policies 
for guidance in the public school system of Maryland and in the several 
geographic units throughout the State of Maryland, namely that: 

1. It is recognized that the law of the land as announced by The 
Supreme Court of the United States automatically has had the effect of 
abolishing all laws of the State of Maryland which raised any distinction 
according to race in the public school system of the State of Maryland 
and of its local subdivisions. 

2. Segregation according to race is hereby abolished in all of the 
State Teachers Colleges of Maryland. Historically and under the 
former practice of separate but equal facilities the present five State 
Teachers Colleges have heretofore been classed into three colleges for 
white students and two colleges for colored students. That classification 
is now eliminated. 

3. The Supreme Court recognized, and the State Board of Educa- 
tion recognizes, that factual conditions vary in different localities through- 
out the State, growing out of the formerly established principle of separate 
but equal facilities, now declared to be unconstitutional and violative of 
the 14th Amendment. Such conditions may include public school build- 
ing facilities, locations of the same with respect to population density of 
residential areas, transportation problems, teaching staffs, and other local 
and geographic conditions if applicable and pertinent to the transition 
from segregation to integration. 

4. The State Board of Education by its statement of May 26, 1954, 
recommended that the local public school officials evaluate their respec- 
tive local conditions and problems in anticipation of the final decision 
of The Supreme Court. All of the County public school officials have 
made or are making such studies. Now that The Supreme Court has 
passed its mandate and has directed compliance with its decree with 
deliberate speed and with due regard to local conditions and in con- 
formity with equitable considerations, the State Board of Education 
calls upon the local public school officials to commence this transition 
at the earliest practicable date, with the view of implementing the law 
of the land. Voluntary compliance with deliberate speed, without the 
necessity of Court compulsion, is advised on the part of all local public 
school officials throughout the State. 

5. The Staff of the State Department of Education shall co-operate 
in all possible ways with local public school officials to give effect to the 
law of the land in the process of the transition from segregation to desegre- 
gation. 

6. Traditionally the citizenry of our State has always accepted con- 
stitutional principles as interpreted by The Supreme Court of the 
United States, as the law of the land. The State Board of Education 
trusts that all citizens will exercise patience and tolerance to the end 
that the law of the land may be implemented in the elimination of racial 
discrimination in the public schools of the State. 

[See Eighty-eighth Annual Report of Maryland Board of Education, 
pages 20 and 21, for first resolution of the Board on desegregation.] 



34 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



DIVISION OF CERTIFICATION AND ACCREDITATION 

Certification 

As will be seen from TABLE 59, page 120, the number of teach- 
ers', supervisors', and administrators' certificates issued each year 
is steadily mounting. Five hundred sixty-seven more were issued 
in 1954-55 than in the preceding year. These figures reflect the 
increase in pupil population, teacher turnover, and reduction in 
class size. 

Unfortunately the number of emergency and other nonstandard 
certificates which have had to be issued because qualified applicants 
for public school positions were not available continues to increase, 
though not nearly so fast as the number of regular certificates issued 
to applicants who meet the full requirements. The picture is 
brightened also by the fact that nearly seventy-one per cent of the 
emergency and substandard certificates in 1954-55 have been issued 
to applicants who have graduated from college but have engaged in 
no recent formal study or who lack some of the necessary pro- 
fessional or academic preparation required for full certificates. 
Such teachers have excellent academic backgrounds and may with 
comparatively little effort qualify for regular certificates. Further- 
more, most of the teachers who were issued provisional certificates 
had previously held regular certificates but had failed to qualify 
for their renewals. 

A restudy of the requirement that every teacher who is to 
be issued a regular certificate should pass a special medical ex- 
amination resulted in an opinion from the Attorney General to 
the effect that the requirement was invalid, and in December, 1954, 
the State Board of Education voted by mail to repeal By-law 22, 
which required the medical examination. The Board, at its Febru- 
ary 23, 1955, meeting, confirmed the action taken by mail. 

It was the opinion of the school superintendent that the law 
requiring an annual certificate that a teacher is not suffering from a 
communicable disease should be strengthened. The State Board 
of Education will consider this matter at a later meeting. 

At approximately the time By-law 22 was repealed, the Board 
of Trustees of the State Teachers' Retirement System ruled that 
teachers with emergency certificates may enter the System without 
passing a medical examination. Such membership is optional, 
though teachers with regular certificates must belong. 

Accreditation 

Section 20 of Article 77 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1951 
Edition, provides that with certain exceptions nonpublic schools may 
operate in Maryland only if they are approved by the State Superin- 
tendent. [See Eighty-fourth Annual Report of Maryland Board 
of Education, page 21.1 



Maryland State Department of Education 



35 



While the law exempts from its provisions schools operated 
by bona fide church organizations, it has been the custom of the 
State Superintendent to approve on a voluntary basis colleges and 
secondary schools conducted by church groups, and similar action 
has been taken with a few nursery schools, kindergartens, ele- 
mentary, and special schools which have requested such action. 
One such school was approved during the school year 1954-55. 

Institutions of Higher Learning 

Institutions of higher learning, most of which have State char- 
ters, have requested and received approval as follows: 



Both the Director and the Assistant Director kept in close touch 
with the six Maryland institutions of higher learning at which pro- 
grams or plans for programs for the preparation of elementary 
school teachers had been approved the preceding spring. It was 
decided to wait until the institutions have had time to stabilize the 
programs before conducting another extensive survey of these 
activities. 

The Division arranged for the re-evaluation of the programs at 
two institutions of higher learning which applied for permission 
to award degrees. The committee consisted of the Assistant Dean 
of the College of Education of Temple University, Philadelphia; 
the Dean of the College of Business Education of Northeastern 
University, Boston; and the Dean of the Evening School of Business, 
University of Richmond, Virginia. The committee visited the 
schools and conferred with members of the administration and of 
the faculty, and after discussing the findings with the Director and 
the Assistant Director of the Division, made recommendations 
which the State Superintendent later forwarded to the institutions 
concerned. 

The Assistant Director represented the Department in the 
evaluation of two institutions by the Middle States Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools. As a result of the evaluation of 
the Peabody Conservatory in Baltimore, the institution was placed 
on the approved list by the Middle States Association. Montgomery 
Junior College was retained on the list. 

Academic Schools Below College Level 
The number and kinds of approved nonpublic academic schools 
below college level which were operating in the State in 1954-55 
were as follows: 



Colleges and universities 

Junior colleges 

Schools of nursing 

Separate professional schools. 



22 
.11 
20 
7 



36 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Type of School Number 

Secondary 41 

Secondary — Elementary 7 

Secondary — Elementary — Kindergarten — 

Nursery School 1 

Secondary — Elementary — Kindergarten 1 

Tutoring 9 

Special 11 

Elementary 4 

Elementary — Kindergarten 5 

Elementary — Kindergarten — Nursery School 6 

Primary 1 

Primary — Kindergarten 7 

Primary — Kindergarten — Nursery School 5 

Kindergarten 30 

Kindergarten — Nursery School 28 

Nursery School 34 

Total 190 



Secondary Schools 

The two State Supervisors of High Schools in the Department 
of Education have the responsibility of visiting and evaluating the 
nonpublic secondary schools in Maryland. Each supervisor visits 
the schools in his regular territory. These number fifty. The two 
supervisors are responsible also for visiting nine tutoring schools. 

Of the fifty-nine schools, thirty-two are operated under the 
auspices of the Roman Catholic Church, one is a Hebrew school, 
and one is a Presbyterian school. None of these schools is obligated 
to meet the State requirements because, as church schools, they 
are exempted under the nonpublic school law. In such instances 
evaluations are made upon the request of the school authorities, and 
the schools are approved if they qualify. The law exempts also 
schools that operate under charters from the Maryland General 
Assembly. Some of both types of schools have not requested ap- 
proval. 

Many of the secondary schools have operated over a long period 
of years and few new secondary schools have been established. In 
1954-55 one Catholic high school which had been functioning for 
several years asked for and received approval, and a small tutoring 
school which opened in the fall of 1954 also qualified for approval. 

Elementary Schools, Nursery Schools, and Kindergartens 

During the year six new preschools and two new elementary 
schools were approved. In addition, one kindergarten which for a 
time had failed to meet the requirement was able to qualify again 
and was reapproved. 

Eight certificates of approval for schools in these categories 
were revoked: four centers closed voluntarily; three decided to 
operate as child care centers; and another became part of the county 
school system. While six of these schools were among those 



Maryland State Department of Education 



37 



originally approved in 1948, when the law went into effect, seventy- 
eight of the schools approved at that time are still operating. 

The enrollments in the nonpublic elementary and preschool 
centers during the two years 1953-54 and 1954-55, including new 
schools approved during each of these years, were as follows: 

Enrollment 
Type of School 1 953-5 k 195^-55 

Nursery 2,346 2,161 

Kindergartens 2,121 2,176 

Elementary 2,891 3,424 

Special 332 468 

Total 7,690 8,229 

In 1954-55 one hundred thirty-six more pupils attended non- 
public special schools than in the previous years, even though more 
public schools provided appropriate facilities for children with 
various handicaps. 

The number of teachers who staffed the nonpublic schools in 
these categories was six hundred seventy-two. Seventy-nine of 
them held valid certificates. Eleven of the teachers held expired 
certificates and twenty could have been certificated except for lack 
of recent credits. Fifty of the teachers attended summer school in 
1954 and sixty-one took courses during the winter. 

The only certificates of approval returned during the year were 
from schools which changed their addresses, names, or organization. 

Eight centers which applied for approval failed to qualify, 
either because the quarters were unsatisfactory or the teachers 
lacked adequate preparation. The applications of several addi- 
tional centers were pending at the end of the year. 

The Supervisor of Accreditation concerned with these schools 
visited each of them at least once and paid two, three, or four visits 
to sixteen of the centers. Some of the extra visits were made at 
the request of the centers. In other cases a further check was neces- 
sary. It was evident that frequent visiting encouraged the centers 
to improve conditions. The supervisor visited approximately 
twenty-five centers which did not qualify for approval but which 
could operate as day-care centers, in order to urge them to change 
improper telephone listings which indicated that they were nursery 
schools or kindergartens. 

The supervisor attended a number of evening meetings to talk 
with parent groups and participated also in two county workshops 
at the request of the county authorities. 

There have been many requests for information about selecting 
schools or for help in establishing nursery schools and kindergartens. 
The supervisor has complied with these requests and has provided 
bibliographies, worked on recommended standards for child-care 
centers, and discussed with groups of parents the significance of 



38 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



State approval. She has prepared and distributed a bibliography, 
suggestions for audio-visual aids, materials on summer programs, 
and information about equipment, courses, and supplies. 

A teacher-preparation sheet has been initiated and will be 
continued for several years to facilitate a study of the change in the 
qualifications of the personnel in a particular school and especially a 
study of qualifications of the staffs in centers which perhaps should 
operate as day-care centers. 

A meeting was held with the directors of special schools to dis- 
cuss budgeting, equipment, and teacher certification requirements, 
and a letter detailing these requirements was sent to school directors 
to guide them in making selections of teachers for the coming year. 

One of the most difficult problems in connection with the opera- 
tion of preschool groups is that there is so little opportunity in 
Maryland for teachers in such schools to take professional courses 
in preschool education. Furthermore, there is an extremely short 
supply of qualified teachers for nursery schools and kindergartens, 
and in many of the schools the salaries are not such as to attract 
qualified applicants. 

Nonacademic Schools 
During the school year 1954-55, twenty nonpublic nonacademic 
schools were approved and received certificates from the State 
Superintendent. The schools belong in the following categories: 



As of June 30, 1955, one hundred eighty-one trade and technical 
schools were operating and met the conditions for approval under 
Section 20 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, 1951 Edition. 

In evaluating the programs in art and music, the Division em- 
ployed experts in this field for advice on the courses of study, the 
qualifications of the instructors, and the equipment and facilities 
available. Members of the Division of Vocational Education helped 
in evaluating certain courses. Furthermore, the State Board of 
Barber Examiners and the State Board of Hairdressers and Beauty 
Culturists co-operated on several occasions by visiting with members 
of the Division various barber and beauty schools in connection 
with which there were problems. 

During the year numerous meetings were held with the in- 
vestigating staff of the Better Business Bureau to follow up com- 
plaints about questionable advertising practices on the part of one 
or two schools. 

Six schools closed during the year. They consisted of a trade 
school and schools teaching dancing, business education, music, art, 
and traffic management. 



Beauty Culture 
Business Education 
Dance 



Hair Design 
Group Piano 
Music 



ShoD 



Maryland State Department of Education 



39 



Approval for Veterans' Training 

A special responsibility of the Division of Certification and 
Accreditation is the approval of schools for veterans' training. 

As of June 30, 1955, forty-four trade or technical schools were 
approved to offer instruction to veterans under Public Laws 346 
and 550 or under Public Law 550 alone. Twenty-two schools were 
approved to offer instruction to veterans under Public Law 346 
only. Four applications for approval under Public Law 550 were 
pending. 

Resident or extensions courses offered by forty institutions of 
higher learning were approved for veterans, as were one hundred 
fifty-six residencies and internships provided by hospitals and 
medical schools, and eight curriculums for the training of registered 
nurses. Four nonpublic secondary schools are approved for 
veterans' training. 

Other Activities 

The work of the Division in connection with Teacher and 
Higher Education is primarily the responsibility of the Assistant 
Director. 

Four meetings of the presidents of the State Teachers Colleges 
were held for the purpose of discussing professional or adminis- 
trative problems at these institutions. Arrangements were made 
also for four joint meetings of the committee of the State Board of 
Education concerned with problems of the Teachers Colleges and 
committees representing the Colleges themselves. One problem 
which received prolonged study was the salary schedule for the 
faculty and staff. In the light of the joint meetings the State 
Board committee prepared a new salary schedule for the considera- 
tion of the State Board of Education and the fiscal authorities of the 
State. 

Personnel and legal problems at the State Teachers Colleges 
involved numerous contacts with the State Commissioner of Per- 
sonnel and the members of his staff and with the office of the At- 
torney General. The Assistant Director also participated in four 
conferences in which the State Department of Education, representa- 
tives of the Teachers Colleges, and the State Department of Budget 
and Procurement considered the budgets of the State Teachers 
Colleges. 

During the year 1954-55 the Assistant Director continued to 
serve as secretary to the Governor's Commission to Study the Needs 
of Higher Education in Maryland. Twenty meetings of the full 
Commission were held during this period. The secretary carried 
on most of the correspondence with the members, arranged for the 
meetings, and supervised the publication of the report, which was 
practically ready for the printer at the end of the school year. 



40 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



The Assistant Director continued to act as secretary also to 
the State Committee on Fulbright Scholarships. He conducted 
correspondence with the adviser for this program at each of the col- 
leges and universities of the State and made arrangements for a 
meeting of the committee which gave personal interviews to each 
applicant. The institutions of higher learning in Maryland nomi- 
nated twenty students for these scholarships, of whom eight were 
given scholarships for study in foreign countries. 



Maryland State Department of Education 41 



DIVISION OF INSTRUCTION 

The services of the Division of Instruction to county schools 
during the school year ending June 30, 1955, may be grouped into 
five broad classes: (1) leadership training programs; (2) assistance 
in curriculum development, county and state levels; (3) supervisory 
aid in school organization and administration; (4) furtherance of 
special education programs; and (5) help to athletic associations in 
planning and staffing intercounty contests. 



Leadership Training Programs 

Programs for the service education of supervisors, principals, 
and others on the professional staffs of the counties were marked by 
their number and variety. A conference of all elementary super- 
visors was held November 3, 4, and 5. The purposes were (1) to 
give emphasis to a literature program in the elementary school, (2) to 
clear some questions concerning the responsibility of the general 
supervisor for special education, (3) to give emphasis to art in the 
elementary school, (4) to introduce Action Research as a way of 
working with teachers to improve instruction. 

Three two-day meetings in language arts were held during the 
year. Each elementary supervisor attended one meeting. This 
series marked the fifth year of the State- wide program in language 
arts. The emphasis in 1954-55 was on the development of compre- 
hension skills in reading. 

The language arts constituted also a major part of the work- 
shop program at Bowie in June, 1954. An unusually high degree of 
interest in this workshop was evidenced by the attendance of 275 
teachers and principals from all over the State. In addition to the 
language arts, arithmetic and science programs were worked on and 
administration studied under highly competent consultants from 
Temple University, Columbia University, Virginia State College, 
and Morgan College. 

A unique venture in the field of language arts was the organiza- 
tion of the Southern Maryland Reading Club, made up of members 
from Charles, St. Mary's, and Prince George's counties. A series 
of monthly meetings was held for the discussion of various reading 
problems and concerns of classroom teachers. These activities were 
culminated by a one-day Reading Conference at Bowie on April 16 
at which time outstanding consultants from Hampton Institute, 
Virginia University, New York University, Goucher College, Coppin 
State Teachers College, and Bowie State Teachers College were 
present. Two hundred ten representatives from 16 counties at- 
tended. Frederick County teachers sponsored a Western Mary- 
land Reading Conference and invited teachers from adjoining 
counties. Fifty-five teachers from 4 counties participated and 
consultants were present from Temple University, Minor Teachers 
College, and Coppin and Bowie State Teachers College. 



42 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Two meetings were held for Child Study Leaders, one two-day 
meeting in January and one three-day meeting in March. Forty- 
two leaders from 13 different counties attended the January meet- 
ing. Thirty-six leaders from the same counties attended the March 
meeting. The Child Study program continues to be an important 
in-service training program for teachers. Forty-four first-year 
groups, 25 second-year groups, and 26 third-year groups were re- 
ported for the State this year, with a total enrollment of 769 teach- 
ers. This was 260 less teachers than last year. The leadership of 
this program has become the responsibility of principals and out- 
standing teachers. There is definite need to give these leaders 
more training, if the program is to continue to be effective. 

Closely allied with child study is the parent education program 
in the State which also depends for its consultants upon the Child 
Study Institute at the University of Maryland. This year 16 coun- 
ties participated in the program. There were in all 127 groups 
and 1,960 participants. Fifty-one of the groups were new this year 
and 34 of the groups which met in 1953-54 did not reorganize. 
Parents who have participated in these discussion groups have made 
the following statements: "It is a relief to find other parents with 
the same problem.' ' "I have learned not to expect the same 
achievement from the children in my family. They are all different.' ' 
"I am no longer afraid to talk about the successes as well as the 
failures of my children." "I am beginning to understand my chil- 
dren better by taking a look at myself." 

A three-day conference of pupil personnel workers was held in 
Hagerstown in November. Dr. Leo Kanner, Director of the 
Harriet Lane Clinic, Johns Hopkins Hospital, gave the opening 
address. Symptoms of maladjustment and the early understanding 
of causes of unacceptable behavior were emphasized. Dr. Richard 
Byrne, University of Maryland, spoke to the group about the rela- 
tionship of pupil personnel to the guidance counselor. Dr. Geneva 
Flickinger of the staff of the Division of Instruction discussed 
special education and the role of pupil personnel workers in this area. 
A committee was appointed to plan a survey as a basis for evaluating 
the present program and projecting future needs. 

Representatives from the various counties, including super- 
visors and many of the county superintendents, met at the Lord 
Baltimore Hotel for one week in September, 1954, to review develop- 
ments in the organization and administration of core programs and 
to determine directions for future developments. Dr. Paul Cooper, 
Superintendent of Schools in Worcester County, had, in preparation 
for the conference, made a very careful survey of practices in the 
various counties of the State. His written report as well as the oral 
reports made by superintendents and others made it clear that core 
programs were rather firmly established in junior high schools. 
Plans were made at this time for the further strengthening of these 
programs. 

The conference on the core method and plan of curriculum 
organization was preliminary and, to a degree, preparatory to a 



Maryland State Department of Education 



4:) 



general curriculum conference held at Towson State Teachers Col- 
lege in June, 1955. This was an anniversary workshop. In 1945, 
representative schoolmen from all parts of the State had projected 
the patterns of curriculum organization and the kinds of content 
which at the various levels of the program should characterize the 
curriculum in a twelve-grade sequence of offerings. The 6-3-3 
plan of organization was being introduced into twenty of the twenty- 
three counties for the first time. Again in the spring of 1955, on the 
tenth anniversary of the first all-State workshop, representative 
school people from all the counties met to review developments in 
the intervening years, study national trends and research findings, 
and project courses of action for the years immediately ahead. 
From the workshop came twelve reports which will be printed and 
distributed during this and the next school year. These reports 
are (1) Guide to Curriculum Development; (2) The Language Arts; 
(3) Social Studies; (4) Science; (5) Mathematics; (6) Art and Music; 
(7) Agriculture; (8) Industrial Arts; (9) Home Economics; (10) 
Health, Safety, and Physical Education; (11) Children with Special 
Needs; and (12) Administrative Policies — Planning, Grouping, 
Evaluation of Pupil Progress. 

One major activity during the year was the organization and 
operation of a State Guidance Committee. This committee of 
twenty-one members representing both Department and county 
personnel interested in the various phases of a program of guidance 
services, held three one-day meetings during the year. Specific 
plans were made for the June workshop for the purpose of preparing 
a State bulletin on the guidance program. 

Prior to the general curriculum workshop at Towson, the high 
school principals and supervisors of the State, City, and county met 
at the Lord Baltimore Hotel for three days to consider what measures 
might be taken to close the gap between increasing demand for 
scientists, technologists, and bi- and multi-lingualists and static 
enrollments in science, mathematics, and foreign languages in high 
school. Recommendations made by the study groups were in- 
corporated into a report from the conference and distributed among 
schools and colleges throughout the State. 

On Saturday, March 26, the Maryland Association for Health, 
Physical Education, and Recreation held its annual spring con- 
ference. This is one of the few groups affiliated with the Maryland 
State Teachers Association that sponsors its own conferences for 
the in-service education of its members. The Supervisor of Health 
and Physical Education, in the Division of Instruction, was present 
to give direction to the program and assist with consultant service. 

In addition to the services of its own personnel to county 
school systems, the Division of Instruction extends and supple- 
ments its program by arranging with colleges and other agencies 
both in and out of the State to have resource people with highly 
specialized knowledge and skill work in the counties on request. 



44 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Specialists in language arts, child study, music, art, library services, 
science, mathematics, and foreign languages help with teacher 
education programs in more than half the counties each year. 

Assistance in Curriculum Development, State and County Levels 

The supervisors on the staff of the Division of Instruction, both 
general and special, were in the counties constantly, usually on 
request, to help plan curriculum workshops and conferences and to 
evaluate programs and courses of study. Garrett, Washington, 
Frederick, Howard, Anne Arundel, Montgomery, Prince George's, 
Baltimore, Talbot, Harford, Kent, Cecil, Calvert, and Wicomico 
Counties were particularly active in these areas this year and made 
corresponding demands upon the time of the State supervisors. 
Services of State personnel drawn upon in this way in relationship 
to recognized needs promise greatest effectiveness. 

This year as in the past a number of high schools in the State 
were preparing for evaluation by a committee representing the 
Middle States Accrediting Association. State supervisors were 
called upon in connection with these surveys to aid in the organiza- 
tion of the staff for self-evaluation prior to the visit of the committee 
of the Regional Association. 

In addition to assisting in the preparation for evaluations made 
by the Regional Association, supervisors of the Division of Instruc- 
tion helped throughout the year with less formalized types of evalua- 
tion. Mr. George Crawford, Supervisor of Curriculum, arranged 
with six pilot elementary schools for extensive evaluation of their 
programs during the school year 1955-56. Several sets of evaluative 
criteria were studied and decision made to use the Boston book, 
Elementary Evaluative Criteria. Detailed plans were made for the 
analysis of the pilot situations. 

The following are representative of pilot programs in operation in 
various counties of the State: Beginning reading in two schools in 
Montgonery county; literature teaching, story telling, choral read- 
ing, poetry, recreational reading in Somerset County; outstanding 
progress in developmental reading in Queen Anne's County; remedial 
reading in several schools in Dorchester County; written report to 
parents in St. Mary's County; work with gifted children in Balti- 
more County; work in language arts in Allegany County; outdoor 
education projects in Wicomico County; preparation of most appro- 
priate materials for an effective physical education program in 
Howard County; and an intramural clinic for girls in the Sollers 
Point High School in Baltimore County. 

The Division of Instruction in conference planned to inventory 
the kinds of adaptations made in instruction in the various county 
schools to the needs of able and talented students. The supervisor 
of special education prepared a questionnaire and canvassed the 
twenty- three county systems. It was found that some special 
programs had been set up but that in general provisions were made 
within the class as a part of the larger problem of adapting instruc- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



45 



tion to individual differences. Results obtained from the ques- 
tionnaire will be used as bases for formulating policies and estab- 
lishing criteria for guidance in developing programs for the in- 
tellectually superior and the gifted student. 

The State Supervisor of Elementary Schools worked through- 
out the year with a representative committee of the counties in the 
preparation of a bulletin for use in connection with the observance 
of Special Days, and one of the State High School Supervisors 
worked with another committee in the preparation of a bulletin 
for use in connection with guidance programs. These two bulletins 
will probably be ready for distribution late in 1955-56 or early in 
1956-57. 

One of the State Supervisors of Curriculum has worked co- 
operatively with the local county units in developing and publishing 
the following materials: 23 county picture portfolios depicting six 
aspects of living in each county — geographical, historical, industrial 
and occupational, social, scenic, and unique; the Pictorial Maryland 
Collection — a set of 275 pictures with scripts on the four sections of 
Maryland. 

Five thousand copies of each of the conservation booklets 
Maryland's Sunken Treasure and Our Underwater Farm had been 
sold by September, 1954. Arrangements were made for a second 
printing and both books are now available for purchase. 

Copies of List I and List II Instructional and Professional 
Materials were distributed to the local boards of education and the 
State teachers colleges. Sixty- two thousand, eighty-eight pieces 
of material developed by our State agencies were ordered by the 
local boards of education and State teachers colleges for use in our 
public schools. 

A three-day State Audio-visual Preview was held and the follow- 
ing audio-visual materials were selected for purchase: 26 films, 
14 filmstrips, and 1 recording. The State audio-visual collection 
now consists of:- 382 films, 171 film-strips, 30 recordings, 8 sets of 
laminated pictures, and 23 sets of colored slides. 

Two art bulletins were developed co-operatively by members of 
the Division of Instruction and representatives from the counties. 
A number of copies of these two art bulletins "Art in Our Maryland 
Schools" and "Resources for an Effective Art Program" were made 
available to the local boards of education and State teachers colleges. 
Arrangements were made for a second printing of these materials. 

Under the general direction of the State Supervisor of Pupil 
Personnel, A Handbook for Pupil Personnel Workers was published 
and copies were distributed to all pupil personnel workers, principals, 
counselors, county welfare departments, county health departments, 
juvenile courts, etc. An attempt was made to clarify the philosophy 
and to explain the relationship of pupil personnel work to the 
total school program. The professional training and qualifications 



46 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



of pupil personnel workers were set forth. The various responsi- 
bilities of supervisors and visiting teachers were written in detail 
and emphasis was given to the role of these workers in co-ordinating 
the services of community agencies with those of the school in the 
best interest of the child. 

Supervisory Aid in a School Organization and Administration 

The elementary and high school supervisors of the State are 
concerned with the improvement of instruction and with school 
organization and administration that this end may best be achieved. 
The high school supervisors particularly are interested in size of 
classes, number of periods in the school day, the satisfaction of 
requirements prescribed for graduation in the various curriculums, 
the average number of unit credits earned by students during four 
years of regular attendance, the amount of released time permitted 
for credit and noncredit work experience programs of all kinds and in 
out-of-school programs accepted as substitutes for the required four 
years of regular attendance. All of these factors may be correlated 
with the quality of the work done in satisfaction of high school 
graduation requirements. 

The two High School Supervisors in the State Department of 
Education analyze the reports on enrollments and organizational 
data submitted by the high school principals early in the school 
year and use their analyses in evaluating with each principal the 
organization and administration of their school for instructional 
purposes. From their study of these reports and from conferences 
during visits, the high school supervisors have noted certain prob- 
lems that, commonly, are of immediate concern to principals and 
teachers throughout the State: 

1. Nature and sequence of offerings in the various high school curri- 
culums including units for graduation 

2. The number of units earned by high school students during four 
years of attendance as this relates to numbers of periods in the 
school day, the student load permitted, and the quality of the work 
done 

3. Released time, work experience programs, and the relation of 
these to the valid purposes of the school 

4. Increasing class size, especially in the junior high school 

5. The pupil-activity programs in high schools 

6. The needs of retarded and the needs of gifted students 

7. The problem of reading, especially in the junior high school 

8. Special offerings for those who have the aptitude and interest, 
particularly in small and medium-sized schools 

The State High School Supervisors are revising the form on 
which the principal makes his annual report. It is hoped that the 
changes which they make will minimize duplications in reports and 
indicate more clearly interrelationships among organizational and 
administrative data and the character of student achievement. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



47 



Furtherance of Special Education Programs 

The Supervisor of Special Education devoted a great deal of 
time and effort this year to conferences with individual parents and 
worked with organized groups of parents: 

A. Leadership 

A great deal of time and effort was devoted to con- 
ferences with individual parents and work with organized 
groups of parents. In the counties where there was no 
supervisor of special education and where an acute problem 
arose, it was sometimes necessary to visit homes and to 
discuss with parents the condition of the particular child 
and the implications for education. More frequently asso- 
ciations of parents requested service either in the form of a 
speech to the whole group, a conference with a committee, or 
a visit to a program which had been initiated by them. In 
addition to these associations contact has been made with 
the Mental Hygiene Society, the Baltimore Hearing Society, 
the Maryland Society for the Prevention of Blindness, 
councils for exceptional children, and speech associations. 

Most of the supervisor's time was consumed in super- 
vising programs throughout the State. Each county was 
visited at least once and several of them, where active pro- 
grams are in operation, were visited as many as eight to ten 
times. Dr. Samuel Kirk, Director of Research in Special 
Education at the University of Illinois, visited the State in 
November to address the general elementary supervisors 
and to observe in Anne Arundel and Prince George's coun- 
ties. The speech therapists from the counties met for one 
day to discuss certification with Miss Merle S. Bateman, 
Director of Certification and Accreditation, and to hear Dr. 
William G. Hardy, Director of Speech and Hearing Center, 
Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

B. Curriculum Revision and Improvement of Materials 

Several counties have been working on curriculum 
materials for the retarded child. Much of this work has 
been informal, but in Montgomery and Baltimore counties 
an effort has been made to set forth in the form of a bulletin 
the type of experiences retarded children should have. In 
this same connection the report of the educational program 
at the Rosewood State Training School was completed and 
submitted to Dr. Clifton T. Perkins, Commissioner of 
Mental Hygiene for the State of Maryland. In addition, 
speech materials have been developed in Anne Arundel, 
Baltimore, and Prince George's Counties. 

Several pilot programs have been developing for the 
past few years. One of these deals with the orthopedically 
handicapped child. Prince George's, Montgomery, Fred- 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



erick, Washington, and Anne Arundel counties have been 
experimenting with a balance of therapy and education 
in order to develop these children to their maximum. In 
no case has a bulletin resulted, but in every case informa- 
tion has been accumulated for future study. 

The newest program has been that for severely re- 
tarded children. During 1954-55 there were 15 classes for 
trainable children in actual operation in the Maryland 
counties. Sixteen additional classes are projected for 
1955-56. The 15 classes served approximately 175 children 
in Harford, Montgomery, Prince George's, Washington, and 
Wicomico counties. This program has been experimental, 
with emphasis upon practical experience and such activities 
as rhythms, nature study, co-ordination, and improved 
speech. 

Montgomery and Prince George's Counties have turned 
their attention to the brain-damaged child. In this area 
there has been so little material published that the teachers 
have explored various possibilities themselves and have 
constantly evaluated the progress of the children, and 
changed their methods in light of the evaluation. 

The school-to-home telephone service has been used 
more widely this year than before. Five counties — Anne 
Arundel, Baltimore, Prince George's, Talbot, and Wicomico 
— have used this service and have been pleased with the 
results. 

Evaluation 

Evaluation has taken place in the areas of certification, 
the development of policies, and the re-examination of the 
total State program. Certification requirements now 
exist only in the field of speech. These have been found 
inadequate and are in the process of revision. A rec- 
ommendation has gone to Miss Bateman from a committee 
of speech teachers. 

The local supervisors of special education have met to 
discuss the State rules and regulations which implement the 
State law on educating handicapped children. _ Those 
causing chief concern had to do with the organizing of 
special classes and the administration of State aid to a 
handicapped child enrolled in a school away from his own 
public school system. These rules and regulations will be 
submitted to Dr. Pullen for his approval. 

The Commission on Special Education in Maryland, 
under the leadership of Mr. George W. Constable, has con- 
tinued its study and is now making recommendations for 
educational programs for various types of exceptional 



Maryland State Department of Education 



49 



children. This report will probably be completed within 
the next year. 

D. Problems 

One of the most pressing problems is the need for 
special services at the junior high school level. During 
1954-55 there were 30 special classes organized in 6 different 
counties for children enrolled in junior and senior high 
schools. The chief difficulties in providing such programs 
seem to center around granting of units and diplomas as 
well as providing for work experiences which these children 
need. 

It has been difficult to find teachers who are qualified 
to teach in special classes at any level. In most cases 
qualified elementary teachers with an understanding of 
deviate children and a desire to experiment have been em- 
ployed. The program would be greatly improved if there 
were readily available a center to which these teachers 
could go for summer courses. 

Several of the counties, either singly or jointly with 
another county, could use a supervisor of special education 
to take over the growing program and to work with the 
general supervisors in explaining its purpose. 

There is need to bring together in the State of Mary- 
land all teachers of the mentally handicapped in order to 
discuss common problems, to pool information, and to 
develop together a suggested curriculum. Several teachers 
have been isolated in their counties for a long while and 
need a professional program of this sort. Even those 
teachers who are in the larger counties and who have 
shared work with colleagues would benefit by having this 
type of service. 

Help to Athletic Associations 

The Assistant Supervisor of Health and Physical Education 
gave consistent consultive service in the redirection of the 1955 
Girls Volleyball Tournament of the Maryland Public Schools 
Athletic Association which was held at the University of Maryland 
on May 14. Changes made were planned by the Committee in 
charge in consonance with the following statements of purposes 
which served as criteria: 

1. To provide a wholesome, healthful, competitive situation for all 
girls 

2. To provide opportunities to effect intelligent health practices 

3. To provide situations in which many girls and teachers may asso- 
ciate informally and helpfully 

4. To permit all member schools the privilege of participating 

5. To stimulate students to play for the joy of play, not for artificial 
incentives. 



50 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



The State Supervisor of Health and Physical Education serves 
as Executive Secretary of the Maryland Public Schools Athletic 
Associations. In this capacity he is responsible for organizing, con- 
ducting, and keeping the records of six State-wide meetings. In addi- 
tion he must give direction to the following State-wide projects spon- 
sored by the Associations: 

1. Two cross country meets for boys 

2. Two basketball tournaments for boys 

3. Two track and field meets for boys 

Other Supervisory Services 

In addition to giving consultant service to programs mentioned 
in the preceding paragraphs, members of the staff of the Division of 
Instruction helped in the planning and organization of many other 
kinds of activities related to instruction in elementary and high 
schools in the counties. Among these were (1) telecasts from 14 
classrooms in two counties; (2) co-ordination of health and edu- 
cational programs through the work of the State Health Council; 
(3) co-ordination of the work of the Automobile Association, the 
Maryland Traffic Safety Commission, and the schools for the up- 
grading of Driver Education programs; (4) co-ordination of the 
work of the Childrens Bureau of the State Welfare Department with 
the work of the Division of Instruction of the State Department of 
Education for the improvement of the educational program in train- 
ing institutions and in camps for delinquent boys sixteen years of 
age and over; (5) helping to plan and staff the summer teacher edu- 
cation program for inmate teachers in the Maryland Penitentiary; 
(6) planning with the counties concerned for the schooling of migrant 
children, 314 children in 9 counties (teachers commented that these 
children adjusted easily and made special contributions to their 
classes in social studies and creative dancing. Many were retarded 
in reading but showed special aptitude in arithmetic); (7) selecting 
teachers and awarding scholarships to the Workshop in Economics 
Education held annually at Goucher College; (8) making detailed 
plans with the counties for the accommodations, entertainment, and 
school visits of school people from foreign countries; (9) taking the 
school census; and (10) organizing and conducting two three-day art 
workshops for elementary and high school teachers, one at the State 
Teachers College at Bowie and the second at the State Teachers 
College at Salisbury. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



51 



DIVISION OF LIBRARY EXTENSION 

The Division of Library Extension has two main functions: 
(1) to develop State-wide public library and school library services 
and encourage the development of library services in State hospitals 
and institutions and (2) to lend materials to libraries when they 
have requests on subjects not satisfactorily covered in local library 
collections and to individuals who live in areas without public 
libraries. 

Close contact is maintained throughout the State with librarians, 
library trustees, and school and institutional administrators by 
means of conferences, visits, correspondence, and publications. 
Community leaders and organizations are kept aware of library 
services and needs and are guided in their interests to improve 
libraries and to establish new libraries. 

The Division has about 85,000 books, periodicals, and audio- 
visual materials which are lent to libraries to supplement local 
library collections and to individuals living in areas where there is 
no public library service. Sixty-five thousand, nine hundred and 
twenty items were lent from July 1, 1954, to June 30, 1955. Loans 
were made to every county, but only 3 per cent of all loans were 
made to individuals in the areas without public libraries. One fifth 
of all loans were adult nonfiction books which were titles or subjects 
requested by library patrons but not available in local libraries. 
Three fourths of the nonfiction loans were from the collection of the 
Division and one fourth was borrowed through interlibrary loan 
from the Enoch Pratt Free Library and other libraries. The largest 
increase over 1954 was in the loan of films and filmstrips. Another 
large increase was shown in the number of reference questions for 
which children's books were used. 

Books on Exhibit, a nationally selected collection of around 500 
books from all publishers and of an interest range to children from 
kindergarten through high school, was lent to twenty of the coun- 
ties for public exhibits of two-week periods or longer. These books 
are used as a guide to the selection of new materials for the school 
and public libraries and are examined by librarians, teachers, and 
many children and parents. Printed catalogues are distributed from 
the exhibit and may be checked for possible purchase when the 
books are being examined. These books were also exhibited at the 
State convention of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers 
and at the University of Maryland during summer school. 

The Cecil County Library's bookmobile, filled with books ready 
for a run, was on exhibit during the Maryland State Fair at Timon- 
ium. An exhibit of materials which public libraries would be 
able to furnish was set up at College Park for the Second Annual 
Conference on Community Development. A bibliography on 
Maryland was made for the Maryland State Teachers Association 
and published in its Institute on Maryland Public Affairs Resource 
Handbook. These materials were exhibited in July, 1954, for the 



52 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



use of the participants in the workshop on Maryland Public Affairs 
at the State Teachers College in Towson. A list of books on Thai- 
land was prepared for the use of study groups of the American Asso- 
ciation of University Women. At the request of Mrs. Fred L. Bull, 
State and National Chairman of Citizenship for the Homemaker's 
Clubs, a reading list of books, The Homemaker-Citizen, was com- 
piled and distributed in the State and nationally. All lists are sent 
to the public libraries to guide them in having materials their 
readers will want. 

Your Division of Library Extension Serves You is an attractive 
folder printed in red and black which tells what the Division has 
and does and how to use it. A map of the State showing the county 
and municipal public libraries is printed on the back. Laws of 
Maryland Relating to Public Libraries was reprinted as a separate 
publication from Public School Laws of Maryland. Audio-Visual 
Catalog 195 U was mimeographed to inform users of the Division's 
policies and holdings in films, filmstrips, slides, records, etc. Annota- 
tions are included for each film and all material is included in the 
subject index. Maryland Libraries 1953-51^ is a mimeographed ad- 
vance copy of the Division's report and statistics about libraries, as 
submitted for the Maryland State Department of Education's 
report. 

Public Libraries 

The public libraries continue to grow in book stock, use, and 
support. Almost 8,000,000 items were borrowed from all the 
public libraries of which more than 4,000,000 were borrowed from 
the libraries in the counties. The support of operating the public 
libraries in the counties was $1,140,000. State aid of 10 cent per 
capita, which was voted by the General Assembly in 1953 for the 
operation of the county libraries and the Enoch Pratt Free Library 
of Baltimore, became available July 1, 1954. 

Even with increases in the libraries of the 14 counties receiving 
State aid, the present average book stock is less than % of a book per 
capita with 9 of the 14 counties showing a number below the average. 
Only one county has 1J^ books per capita which is the goal for Mary- 
land libraries serving 100,000 or more and a recognized national 
standard. Six of the counties report only one professional librarian 
on the staff. At least three counties which last year had two or 
three professional librarians have one less this year, since the 
salaries they can pay are lower than are offered by some other 
libraries. 

Ten of the 14 counties are supporting the operation of the 
public libraries with more than the 2 cent tax, which is the legal 
minimum required by the 1945 law. In 1954-55 this minimum re- 
quired that a total of $452,500 be appropriated for public library 
support in the 14 counties, but they provided $768,400, an increase 
of $315,900 from county tax funds and an average of a 3 2/5 cent 
tax. Samples range for St. Mary's about 5 cents; Cecil, Charles, 
Montgomery, Prince George's, and Queen Anne's more than 3 



Maryland State Department of Education 



53 



cents, and Baltimore City for the Enoch Pratt Free Library more 
than 8 cents. Baltimore City is not included in average computa- 
tions. The Mayor and City Council of Baltimore receive State aid 
of 12 cents per capita which is added to their appropriation for the 
Pratt Library. Only Charles and Montgomery Counties started 
their county libraries with county appropriations larger than the 
2 cents tax. 

The 1945 law specifies as the first duty of the Division of Library 
Extension "To develop State-wide public library and school library 
services" (Article 77, Chapter 15, Section 176 (a) of the Annotated 
Code of the Public General Laws of Maryland of 1951). Even though 
local leadership has not demanded county-wide service in the 9 
counties not receiving State aid, it has seemed advisable to the staff 
of the Division to promote improvement of the library legislation 
before urging the people of these counties to attempt extended 
service. 

The members of the Division work closely with the Maryland 
Library Association's Legislative and Planning Committee in its 
continued efforts to prepare a program of legislation which will pro- 
vide adequate minimum support for public libraries. 

The Association held three regional meetings in different parts 
of the State in December. Community leaders as well as association 
members attended and were informed about the status of Maryland 
public libraries and recommendations for legislation. Because of 
these recommendations, legislation was introduced in 1955, but 
failed. The bills provided for: 

1. County support of the public library which must total at least 5 
cents on each $100 of assessed valuation. This can be made up from 
a variety of sources: county tax, county appropriation, town tax, 
special district levies, or private gifts, all of which must be for 
current operating expenses. 

2. The State to pay 30 cents per person to each county qualifying for 
State aid under the provisions described above. 

3. The State to add as much as necessary to the local funds plus the 
30 cents per capita to make the total $1.50 per person. 

4. An additional $5,000 in State aid to each county which contracts 
with other counties to form regional libraries. 

The Association has asked the Legislative Council to appoint a 
committee to study the library situation and to prepare a plan of 
sound financial framework for the development of good public 
library service to all Maryland citizens. 

The members of the Division have continued to work as mem- 
bers of the Library Development Committee in developing a plan 
for future services of the public libraries and the part in library service 
which should be the function of the Division of Library Extension. 

Two in-service training sessions were held for county and 
municipal librarians. A two-day meeting on public relations and 
library publicity was held in March with Miss Marie Loizeaux, 
Editor of the Wilson Library Bulletin, as consultant. Library 



54 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



administrators and several professional staff members attended. 
In May, Miss Ruth Warncke and Mr. R. E. Dooley of the American 
Heritage Project of the American Library Association spent two 
days with 25 of the librarians in a workshop on discussion methods 
which have been successfully used in public libraries throughout the 
country. 

Maryland librarians, for a second year, registered in larger 
numbers than those from any other state at the Institute held on 
Adult Education in Libraries at Rutgers University, June 28 to 
July 1. Members of the Division Staff were on the Planning Com- 
mittee, prepared a working paper, and acted as consultant for one 
group and discussion leader for another. 

On October 31, the Charles County Library had open house and 
a formal opening of its new headquarters library which is a wing of 
the Charles County Court House. This is the first and only county 
library headquarters built from county funds. The others are 
operating in rented quarters or in buildings given for libraries. 

Miss Amy Winslow, Director of the Enoch Pratt Free Library, 
is a member of the A.L.A. Co-ordinating Committee on Revision of 
Public Library Standards. On February 5-9 this Committee in- 
vited 34 librarians to a working conference in Chicago to prepare 
material for the original draft of the standards. The Director 
of the Division of Library Extension and three other Maryland 
librarians worked in this group. 

School Libraries 

In October, 1954, School Libraries in Maryland, an official 
bulletin of the State Department of Education, was published. 
School librarians, elementary teachers and principals, and general 
elementary and secondary supervisors have been the biggest con- 
sumers. Out-of-State requests for copies of the bulletin continue 
to come. 

There were 119 full-time librarians in the junior-senior high 
schools and 41 in the elementary schools. There were 64 part-time 
librarians. 

Reports from the high school libraries indicate that their serv- 
ices continue to expand. In the Middle Atlantic States evaluations 
of high schools the libraries rate at least as high as the rest of the 
school and sometimes higher. 

The elementary school library program also continues to ex- 
pand. Baltimore County had 33 elementary school librarians; 
Montgomery County employed their first one this year. Thirteen 
counties are developing central elementary libraries — some of them 
county-wide and some in scattered schools. If central libraries 
are important in elementary schools, it is as important to have a 
librarian in a large elementary school as in a large high school; 
small schools need some local level advice and guidance, too. One 



Maryland State Department of Education 



55 



librarian might work in several small schools ; an arrangement might 
be worked out whereby the local high school librarian might help out. 

The traveling exhibit of approximately 500 new books was 
shown to pupils, teachers, librarians, and parents in 20 counties. 
The exhibit is popular with county school administrators and librari- 
ans, and it undoubtedly has been a factor in the improvement of 
the quality of the books purchased for school libraries. 

Mrs. Ruth Gagliardo, Library Chairman of the National 
Congress of Parents and Teachers, spent one day in Montgomery 
County where she conducted a workshop for chairmen of elementary 
school library committees and principals of the school in which they 
work. The workshop was sponsored by the Division of Library 
Extension and the Montgomery County Board of Education. Mrs. 
Gagliardo was also a speaker at one of the general sessions at the 
annual conference of the Maryland Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Dr. Lowell Martin, Dean of the Graduate Library School at 
Rutgers University, was in the State for one day to discuss basic 
undergraduate programs in library science. The heads of the 
Department of Education at the University of Maryland, Western 
Maryland College, and Morgan State College and the staff of the 
Division of Library Extension participated in the conference with 
Dr. Martin. 

State Institutions 

The Division of Library Extension has the responsibility for 
the promotion of improved library service in the State-operated 
hospitals, training schools, and correctional and other institutions. 
The responsibility is carried out primarily through the activities 
and advisory services of the Supervisor of County and Institution 
Libraries. 

The Division also lends books and other materials to institu- 
tions, prepares special collections of books for exhibit and evaluation, 
and makes available to institutions all the lending and other services 
available to other libraries throughout the State. 

The number of volumes loaned to State institutions during the 
year was 2,924. 

There is a professionally trained librarian in each of three of the 
Tuberculosis Hospitals. They held two one-day conferences at 
the Division of Library Extension office with the Supervisor of 
County and Institution Libraries. Plans were made for joint book 
selection and other co-operative practices. Dr. G. Canby Robinson, 
then Executive Secretary of the Maryland Tuberculosis Association, 
met with the group to discuss the use of volunteers in the hospital 
libraries and the use of the Maryland Tuberculosis funds for library 
books. 

With the co-operation of Mr. Manila, Chief of the Division of 
Training Schools of the State Department of Welfare, the Division 



56 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



of Library Extension invited the Directors of Education and the 
staff members in charge of the libraries in the juvenile training 
schools to a meeting to discuss library service in the training schools. 
Miss Marion Vedder, Supervisor of Institution Libraries in New 
York State, was consultant to the group. Interest was expressed 
in having regular meetings on library problems. The Supervisor 
of County and Institution Libraries served as a member of a com- 
mittee appointed by Dr. Spitznas to evaluate the education program 
in the training schools. Libraries in the training schools do not 
have trained personnel in charge, nor is there a regular budget for 
books and other library materials. 

A new library was organized this year at the Reformatory for 
Males under the direction of the Director of Education. Three 
thousand dollars was appropriated for new books. Weekly visits 
are made to all sections of the institution with a book cart carrying 
about 200 books. Some of the men in adjacent areas are allowed to 
come to the library. The institution staff has expressed a need for a 
professional librarian to develop this service. 

Patuxent Institute soon after its opening began organizing a 
library under the supervision of the staff of the psychology depart- 
ment. The book collection consists mostly of gifts, although they 
have been carefully selected by the staff. 

With the exception of the tuberculosis hospitals the greatest 
need in all the institutions is for trained librarians. Progress has 
been made over the past several years and interest continues to grow. 
More continuous attention needs to be given to all aspects of library 
service, and the need for a full-time trained staff member in each of 
the larger institutions is essential if the service is ever to achieve a 
satisfactory level. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



57 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

There are eleven programs of educational services operating 
within the vocational division, included in which are the regular 
vocational programs in agriculture, home economics, trades and 
industries, and distributive education, and the special programs 
such as adult education, school milk program, school lunch program, 
surplus commodities, and veterans' on-farm and on-the-job training. 
All of these programs are financed, in whole or in part, by Federal 
as well as State funds. 

Vocational Agriculture 

Much progress has been made this year in the out-of-school 
classes for young and adult farmers. Participation by some of the 
teachers in a workshop not only increased understanding of pro- 
cedures and techniques, but developed enthusiasm in this particular 
area of vocational education. 

Another important phase of development in agriculture was 
the operation of a farm mechanics workshop, attended by all voca- 
tional agricultural teachers who worked in welding, tractors, and 
farm mechinery. There is a rapid trend toward farm mechaniza- 
tion, and it is important that teachers acquire skill and experience 
in order to make their teaching in farm mechanics effective. Real 
progress has been noted in this specific area of agricultural teaching. 

The Maryland Chapter of Future Farmers of America Asso- 
ciation continues to be an integral part of the agricultural program 
in the State and the accomplishments of the members are numerous 
and varied, including such items as reconditioning farm machinery, 
repairing farm buildings, and study of conservation work (soil, 
water, and forests). Two Maryland high school boys were chosen 
as Star American Farmers in the North Atlantic Region, which in- 
cludes twelve States. This organization was also represented by 
seven teams in out-of-State judging contests during the year 
1954-55. 

Distributive Education 

Emphasis was placed on the careful selection of students in 
this very important program, using maturity rather than grade 
placement in such selection. Considerable emphasis was placed 
on new and improved facilities. New distributive education labora- 
tories have done much to give the program identification and status. 
The quality of the student selected for this program made a fine 
impression on business men and student performance rate above 
average. 

Public relation activities in this program were excellent, includ- 
ing working committees with the Retail Merchants Association, 
Associations of Commerce, and numerous other trade and industrial 
organizations. 



58 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Home Economics 

One of the outstanding accomplishments in this area of vocational 
education was the workshop, where curriculum materials were de- 
veloped for grades 7 to 12. 

The State Study on Teaching Foods and Nutrition was con- 
tinued throughout the year 1954-55 and, in addition, the home 
economics program as a whole in the State was studied. 

The demand for classes in home economics for adults far ex- 
ceeds the funds available. 

Special attention was given to increasing the variety of courses 
offered and encouragement was given for home economics programs 
for adults in counties where heretofore none has existed. In-service 
training for teachers in this phase of the home economics program 
has been given. 

Trade and Industrial Education 

Particular emphasis has been given to the development of 
courses of study and this material is now available for all trades. 
This is considered an important element in the in-service program, 
especially for new teachers. This must be a continuing project for 
all teachers, if their teaching is to keep abreast with new materials 
and methods used in the trades. 

Emphasis was also placed upon development of teaching aids, 
production jobs, health and safety programs, live work, and pupil 
planning. Many instances of achievement could be cited in each 
of these areas. One of the most outstanding projects was the 
"Hagerstown House/' — a school project in which all departments 
co-operated. The trade training included in this project covered 
carpentry, cabinet work, electrical work, bricklaying, cement finish- 
ing, plastering, painting and decorating, and many other related 
experiences. The agricultural department had charge of land- 
scaping and planting, and the home economics department rec- 
ommended types of appliances and took charge of the interior dec- 
orating. 

Diversified Occupations 

The pupils enrolled in this program have taken part in many 
kinds of occupations for purposes of receiving training. The 
teacher-co-ordinator, parents, employer, civic and governmental 
groups have worked together with this program to improve educa- 
tion in general. This program has extended beyond the school it- 
self and has recognized and used the community as a laboratory 
for instruction and experimentation. The pupil's time has been 
divided between school and a part-time job. The in-school schedule 
has included a balanced combination of subjects required for gradua- 
tion and subjects directly related to his or her job activities. The 
performance and progress on the job have been supervised by the 
employer in co-operation with the school teacher-co-ordinator. 
This program has greatly reduced the number of drop-outs by pro- 



Maryland State Department of Education 



59 



viding a type of education ' 'tailored" to the interests and wants of 
the pupil. As a general rule students have gone into business or 
industry immediately upon completion of their high school work 
without any further formal study. The program has achieved 
very satisfactory results and is growing. 

Industrial Arts 

The increasing complexity of our industrial economy and the 
increasing amount of mechanization encountered in almost every 
phase of daily living makes it essential that industrial arts experi- 
ences be regarded as basic and fundamental for all youth. In this 
area, planned experiences have been centered around the study and 
use of tools, machines, materials, and processes through which man 
has adapted the physical world to serve his needs. 

Special emphasis and attention was given in grades 7, 8, and 9 
to help pupils discover their aptitudes, interests, and abilities. A 
wide range of industrial arts experiences have been provided for 
each youth in order to develop a broader understanding of oppor- 
tunities and requirements for industrial employment, and to explore 
individual interests and aptitudes. These experiences have assisted 
the pupil in making more intelligent educational and occupational 
choices, 

During the year 1954-55 a number of school-community enter- 
prises have been organized, such as school-planning groups, curri- 
culum committees, teacher workshops, and business-labor-education 
programs. Outstanding among these was the workshop and the 
development of an Industrial Arts Bulletin. 

County curriculum groups have produced supplementary 
bulletins dealing with local programs. 

Television programs have been used to show industrial arts 
programs in operation. 

There have been exhibits of pupils' work at county fairs, school 
functions, State and county association meetings. 

In the senior high schools, pupils have progressed to an age 
where they are interested in and need experiences identified with 
advanced work. A high degree of accuracy and effective use of fine 
measurements are stimulated by a desire to delve into areas of 
special interest and, in many instances, the pupil has been permitted 
to pursue this interest to a point of specialization. Real progress 
has been evidenced in this area. 

Considerable emphasis was given to the development of con- 
sumer intelligence as it may apply to recognition of good workman- 
ship, finishes, materials, and functional value of the product. 

Industrial Arts education included those planned experiences 
which are centered around the study and use of tools, machines, 
materials, and processes through which man has adapted the 



60 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



physical world to serve his needs. These experiences are a planned 
and co-ordinated part of the total educational program. 

Adult Education 

There has been a rapidly increasing demand for adult education 
courses. A tremendous growth has been evidenced in this area 
but limited funds has checked the growth to some extent. The 
types of courses offered have been limited to subject area fields which 
are not reimbursable from Federal funds and the predominant types 
of courses dealt with commercial work, high school equivalence ex- 
amination preparation, and vocational subjects. 

Educational Services to Industry 
One of the major activities of this service during the year 
1954-55 has been in the apprenticeship area. Assistance has been 
given by the State Supervisor in setting up apprenticeship programs 
in establishments requesting approval to train veteran apprentices 
under the G. I. Bill. These veterans have been supervised by the 
State Supervisor on the job as well as in the field of related instruc- 
tion. 

In the larger industrial areas such as Baltimore, Cumberland, 
and Hagerstown, evening classes were held for the major trades in 
such subjects as mathematics, science, blueprint reading, and other 
technical subjects. 

There has been a marked growth in the number of individuals 
attending evening classes in basic, intermediate, or advanced elec- 
tronics. 

Another major achievement in the area of educational services 
to industry is that of foreman or supervisory training and develop- 
ment. Programs were developed for in-plant and out-of-plant 
training. The in-plant training programs were designed to meet 
specific company needs. The out-of-plant evening supervisory 
management courses were more standardized and included indus- 
trial safety, job instructor training, job relations training, job 
methods, and conference leadership. Twenty-three classes were 
organized in this area, with a total enrollment of 422. 

Of specific importance in this area of supervision has been the 
Nurse's Aide Instructor Training Program, developed for the 
American Hospital Association and the National League for Nursing. 
These programs have been very well received and the accomplish- 
ments have been noteworthy. 

Still another program of specific interest to school adminis- 
trators was developed, that of custodial training. Training ma- 
terials and techniques were developed by the State Department of 
Education, in co-operation with county building operations super- 
visors at the Towson Workshop. The State Supervisor for this 
area was called upon to assist in developing programs and training 
of instructors for this very important phase of school building opera- 
tion. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



61 



School Lunch Program 

Growth in this program has been evidenced in the following 
areas: 

Stability of personnel — although employees come into the 
program, due to expansion of program and replacements, many pro- 
grams had little change in personnel. It is estimated that approxi- 
mately 1,700 people were employed either on a full- or part-time 
basis during 1954-55. 

Increased supervision — counties provided more supervision for 
this program. There were School Lunch supervisors in 12 counties 
and Baltimore City. 

In-service training programs — these were planned for em- 
ployees at both State and local levels and proved to be very helpful. 

Professional organizations — growth in local interest in this pro- 
gram led to the formation of The Maryland School Food Service 
Association, the membership of which includes school lunch per- 
sonnel. The first State meeting of this organization was held in the 
fall of 1954 and 348 individuals were listed as members. 

Increased facilities and services — a remarkable improvement 
in both facilities and services has been evidenced, both in new build- 
ings and in the renovation of existing buildings. This has meant 
that more schools were able to participate in the program, as well 
as serve a complete lunch for the children. 

Educational growth — has been noted through better under- 
standing of the intent and purposes, the nutritional value to chil- 
dren, and acceptance of the program as part of the total educational 
experience for the child. 

Detailed breakdowns showing the growth of the program from 
its inception in 1946 to the present time are shown in TABLES 
116 and 117, on pages 178 and 179. 

Special School Milk Program 

This program was developed by the United States Department 
of Agriculture for the years 1954-55 and 1955-56, and provided 
$50,000,000 annually of funds of the Commodity Credit Corporation 
to increase consumption of fluid milk by children in nonprofit 
schools of high school grade and under. 

This program has been administered through the State Depart- 
ment of Education and has included 714 schools, or 76 per cent of 
the 938 schools in the State. 

In summarizing both the School Lunch and Special School 
Milk Programs, 785 schools were approved for participation in these 
two programs during the year 1954-55. 

Institutional-On-Farm Training Program 

During the year, 21 counties trained 194 veterans in the In- 
stitutional-On-Farm Training Program. The net income from the 



62 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



farms for this period exceeded $287,000.00. At present, 82.5 per 
cent of these veterans are now operating farms, 11 per cent work on 
farms and 6.5 per cent have gone into industry or private business. 

The objective of this program is to teach enrollees how to live 
as well as how to make a living on a farm. The program has shown 
real progress and has been very successful. 

It has been the purpose of the program to provide the best pos- 
sible training to each veteran showing a sincere desire to become 
established in a farm business or have control of a farm or portion 
of a farm sufficiently adequate to provide a reasonable income to 
the veteran and his family. 

The following areas have been covered in this program: 

1. Instruction in planning and carrying out a well-balanced farm pro- 
gram of sufficient size to provide full-time employment and insure a 
satisfactory income 

2. Development of skills and abilities to increase managerial efficiency 
of veteran farm trainees 

3. Development of soil conservation program to increase productivity 
of soil 

4. Development of practices to improve livestock and crop production 
on farm 

5. Development of economical program of improvement of farm 
homes, buildings, machinery, and equipment 

6. Production and conservation of food needed by farm family 

7. Familiarizing enrollees with various agricultural agencies and 
services available to farmers within a community. 

Apprenticeship and On-the-Job Training 

During the year 1954-55 certificates of approval for the training 
of veterans were issued to 321 business establishments, covering 
many varied job classifications. This increased the number of 
approved establishments to 1,109 for the training of veterans. 

All establishments were visited by the State Supervisor periodi- 
cally for the purpose of assisting employers in setting up programs 
and supervising the trainees on the job. Attention was also given 
to discrepancies in training, as outlined by the Veterans Adminis- 
tration. 

This program has been a very helpful one, to veterans and em- 
ployers alike. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



63 



DIVISION OF VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION 

The work of the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation during 
the fiscal year 1955 was highlighted by four significant events: the 
rehabilitation of the ten thousandth disabled person, the establish- 
ment of the Disability Determinations Program, the writing of the 
new State Plan in conformance with Public Law 565, and the 
National Rehabilitation Association Convention in Baltimore. 

The Division's ten thousandth rehabilitated person typifies 
the hoped-for achievements of the many thousands of potentially 
employable disabled people in the State of Maryland. Permanently 
injured in an automobile accident, he, like all other disabled indi- 
viduals, looked to the future with doubt and dismay. He could 
never return to his job as brakeman on a railroad; and how would 
he support his wife and two children? But the services of vocational 
rehabilitation opened to him, as to others, the chance for a new life 
in a job where he would not be handicapped and where he could 
earn enough to re-establish his family in a comfortable home. 

The completion of a rehabilitation program was important not 
alone to this client but to ten thousand more who had not completed 
their programs and ten thousand others who would hear of rehabilita- 
tion for themselves and their neighbors in the future. 

Maryland had rehabilitated 10,389 disabled persons from the 
beginning of its program in September, 1929, up to the close of the 
year on June 30, 1955. 

Despite the growing number of public and private facilities 
available to the disabled, the problem of reaching all of them with 
adequate vocational rehabilitation services continues to present a 
challenge to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 

The quality of professional knowledge and skill in rehabilitating 
over 10,000 persons has improved and developed tremendously in 
helping to meet the problems of preparing disabled persons for full- 
time employment in the competitive labor market. The successful 
employment of that many disabled persons has demonstrated to 
almost as many employers that handicapped persons are just as 
efficient, reliable, stable, careful, and versatile as normal workers. 
That small army of successful handicapped workers has dramati- 
cally shown thousands of other disabled workers what they can do. 
These more than 10,000 rehabilitated persons in Maryland have 
earned in wages over $100,000,000. On the basis of those re- 
habilitated between 1929 and 1945, their first ten years of earnings 
totaled more than $27,000,000.00. Those rehabilitated in the last 
ten years, at an annual rate of income at time of rehabilitation, have 
earned more than $75,000,000.00. 

The readiness, availability, and adequacy of services for the 
disabled accomplished through ten thousand rehabilitations con- 
tribute immeasurably to the solution of the problem of increasing 
disability among our population. 



64 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



In keeping with an amendment to the Social Security Act, 
passed by Congress in 1954, Governor Theodore R. McKeldin des- 
ignated the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation as the agency in 
the State to make Disability Determinations for the Bureau of Old- 
Age and Survivors Insurance. The creation of this program within 
the Division will not only preserve to the disabled sound determi- 
nation for added Old-Age and Survivors benefits but will give to 
all handicapped citizens more direct and immediate access to|the 
vocational rehabilitation service. A separate unit of the Division 
was established by the State Board of Education to handle this new 
phase of its program. It consists of one counselor, three junior 
counselors and one Medical Consultant. It was logical to place this 
specialized program in the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation. 
Operation of the Disability Determinations Program requires techni- 
cal knowledge of the effect of physical and mental impairment on a 
person's ability to engage in gainful activity. It requires the secur- 
ing of proper and adequate medical reports from physicians, special- 
ists, and hospitals who have treated OASI applicants; it necessitates 
the making of contacts with employers and former associates of the 
disabled; it demands the use of personnel thoroughly trained in all 
phases of vocational rehabilitation. The experience of counselors in 
this Division in reading medical reports and interpreting medical 
terminology and language gives them insight into medical data 
used in determining the effects of disabilities. 

The Disability Determinations Program also presents an im- 
mediate source of referral of disabled persons to rehabilitation 
service. Every applicant for the disability freeze is advised of the 
existence of vocational rehabilitation service and is given a brochure 
of information concerning it. If the person is interested, he may 
apply for the service. Many of them in the employable age groups 
are potential rehabilitants. 

The State Board of Education adopted a new plan for the opera- 
tion of its vocational rehabilitation services in conformity with 
Public Law 565, enacted by the 83rd Congress in 1954. The new 
plan permits the provision of additional needed services for re- 
habilitating the disabled and establishes the allocation of Federal 
funds on a more equitable basis. 

The new State Plan required for participation in the Federal 
Grants-In-Aid Program for Vocational Rehabilitation enables the 
division to provide and extend increasingly essential services in a 
number of ways: 

A. By reorganizing the district offices along more functional lines 

B. By enabling counselors to secure more essential individual reha- 
bilitation services 

C. By encouraging greater professional development through oppor- 
tunities for special training with leaves of absence 

D. By developing facilities for improving public relations 

E. By developing more objective standards for determining economic 
need 



Maryland State Department of Education 



65 



The new Law 565 under which the Plan operates changes the 
provisions for Federal allotments of money. 

A. They allot money on the basis of a smaller ratio (52.39 Federal to 
47.61 State) but the appropriations permit a larger amount of 
Federal money. 

B. They make for less limitation on the use of Federal money. 

C. They permit the encouragement of extending special rehabilitation 
facilities by state vocational rehabilitation and other state agencies, 
municipalities, and nonprofit making organizations. 

D. They allow the Employment Service to set up special facilities in 
co-operation with the Rehabilitation Service, to secure employment 
for the handicapped. 

The 1954 convention of the National Rehabilitation Associa- 
tion which met in Baltimore on October 24-28, featured some of 
the most outstanding programs and speakers ever presented at an 
NRA meeting. The entire Maryland staff participated in the 
organization and administration of the convention. The Association 
presented to the Director of the Maryland program an award for 
his work as moderator of the nation's first and only sustaining tele- 
vision show dedicated to the disabled. The registration of 1,061 
delegates included workers in rehabilitation from every section of 
the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, Alaska, Hawaii, and the 
Virgin Islands. 

The value of the Annual National Rehabilitation Association 
Convention to Maryland in advancing the opportunities of re- 
habilitation are difficult to evaluate, but certain observations would 
indicate its worth: the participation on the program of outstanding 
doctors, employers, social workers, health nurses, and representatives 
of effective community agencies attested to the interest of profes- 
sional personnel in the outcome of vocational rehabilitation serv- 
ices; the programs were of the nature to push out the frontiers of 
special services for the handicapped in such fields as co-ordination 
of community resources, maximum rehabilitation of the severely 
handicapped through physical restoration, employment of the 
handicapped and rehabilitating the mentally ill. These were 
pioneer programs designed to enlarge the vision of professional peo- 
ple engaged in various special services organized to serve the handi- 
capped. 

The 1,075 rehabilitations last year exceeded by 47 the 1,028 
for 1952; the 4,626 persons served exceeded by 274 the 4,352 for 1952; 
and the 2,783 persons referred exceeded by 180 the 2,603 referrals 
for 1951. The live roll was 6,667, those still receiving service were 
2,634, and 1,089 were being investigated and evaluated for service. 
The salaries earned by rehabilitated persons in 1955 was at the rate of 
$2,159,232.92 annually. 



66 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 1— Actual Days Schools Were Open: Opening and Closing Dates: 
Maryland Public Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1955 





Number 


Date of 


Date of 




Actual Days 


Opening 


Closing 


County 


Schools 


Schools 


Schools 




Were Open 


September, 








1954 


1955 




Baltimore City 


186 


7 


17 




183 


7 


10 




181 


9 


17 


Baltimore 


185 


7 


17 


Calvert 


181 


8 


10 


Caroline 


181 


7 


9 


Carroll 


181 


7 


10 


Cecil 


183 


9 


15 




182 


3 


8 


Dorchester 


181 


8 


10 


Frederick 


182 


8 


10 


Garrett 


182 


8 


10 


Harford 


181 


7 


10 




185 


7 


17 


Kent 


181 


7 


10 


Montgomery 


180 


7 


13 


Prince George's 


181 


7 


15 




181 


9 


10 


St. Mary's 


181 


7 


16 


Somerset 


183 


1 


May 31 


Talbot 


182 


2 


10 


Washington 


182 


7 


10 




181 


7 


3 




183 


7 


10 



Maryland State Department of Education 



67 



TABLE 2— Number Public Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days : Counties of 
Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year 
County 


Schools in Session Less Than 180 Days 


Total 
Number 


One-Teacher 
Elementary 


Graded 
Elementary 


High 
School 


WHITE SCHOOLS 


1954 

1955 

Caroline 

Montgomery 


10 

5 

1 
1 

2 


1 


6 
5 
cl 
al 
cl 
b2 


3 


COLORED SCHOOLS 


1954 

1955 


3 
2 
2 


1 


1 

2 

a,d2 


1 



a, 178; b, 177; c, 173; d, 172. 

Reasons: Baltimore — construction delay; Caroline — power failure; Montgomery — construction de- 
lay; and Prince George's — construction delay in three schools and heating difficulties in 
one school. 



68 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 3— Fall Enrollment, Teaching Staff, Number of Schools: Public and Nonpublic— 
by Color : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Type of School 


Grand Total 


Elementary 


Secondary 




Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 



ENROLLMENT 



Public and Nonpublic 

Total State 


550,449 
187,963 
362,486 

455,555 
143,688 
311,867 

94,894 
44,275 
50,619 






374,201 
134,067 
240,134 

293,958 
97,595 
196,363 

80,243 
36,472 
43,771 






176,248 
53,896 
122,352 

161,597 
46,093 
115,504 

14,651 
7,803 
6,848 






Baltimore City 














Total Counties* 


321,770 


40,716 


214,348 


25,786 


107,422 


14,930 


Public 

Total State 


Baltimore City 














Total Counties* 


271,984 

92,426 
42,640 
49,786 


39,883 

2,468 
1,635 
833 


171,368 

78,022 
35,042 
42,980 


24,995 

2,221 
1,430 
791 


100,616 

14,404 
7,598 
6,806 


14,888 

247 
205 
42 


Nonpublic 

Total State 


Baltimore City 


Total Counties 




TEACHING STAFF 


Public and Nonpublic 

Total State 


20,166 
6,444 
13,722 

16,848 
4,965 
11,883 

3,318 
1,479 
1,839 


















Baltimore City 


















Total Counties* 


12,204 


1,518 














Public 

Total State 


9,600 
2,912 
6,688 






7,248 
2,053 
5,195 






Baltimore City 














Total Counties* 


10,387 

3,229 
1,412 
1,817 


1,496 

89 
67 
22 


5,879 


809 


4,508 


687 


Nonpublic 

Total State 


Baltimore City 














Total Counties 




























NUMBER OF SCHOOLS 


Public and Nonpublic 

Total State 


tl,314 
t279 
tl,035 

t942 
U64 
t778 

t372 
tll5 
t257 






1,145 
244 
901 

796 
134 
662 

349 
110 
239 






292 
57 
235 

221 
38 
183 

71 
19 

52 






Baltimore City 














Total Counties* 


t856 


tl79 


739 


162 


201 


34 


Public 

Total State 


Baltimore City 














Total Counties* 


t604 

t356 
U04 
t252 


U74 

tl6 
Ul 

t5 


505 

334 
100 
234 


157 

15 
10 

5 


150 

68 
17 
51 


33 

3 
2 
1 


Nonpublic 

Total State 


Baltimore City 


Total Counties 





For basic data see TABLES 19, 20, 21, I, V, and X. 

* Includes enrollment, teaching staff, and number of elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



69 



TABLE 4 — Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools : State of Maryland : 

1946-1955 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICf 


Nonpublic 


Ending 


















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



GRAND TOTAL 



1946. 
1947. 
1948. 
1949. 
1950. 
1951. 
1952. 
1953. 
1954. 
1955. 



356,895 
363,103 
375,391 
390,867 
413,731 
441,005 
464,240 
495,543 
529,429 
566,900 



150,055 
150,943 
154,450 
156,704 
161,075 
165,136 
169,320 
177,329 
184,753 
192,446 



206,840 
212,160 
220,941 
234,163 
252,656 
275,869 
294,920 
318,214 
344,676 
374,454 



297,590 
301,173 
310,149 
323,403 
343,923 
367,532 
386,724 
414,183 
443,338 
472,006 



112,551 
113,149 
115,725 
117,476 
121,365 
124,948 
128,682 
135,935 
141,880 
148,171 



185,039 
188,024 
194,424 
205,927 
222,558 
242,584 
258,042 
278,248 
301,458 
323.835 



59,305 
61,930 
65,242 
67,464 
69,808 
73,473 
77,516 
81,360 
86,091 
94.894 



37,504 
37,794 
38,725 
39,228 
39,710 
40,188 
40,638 
41,394 
42,873 
44.275 



TOTAL ELEMENTARY 



1946. 
1947. 
1948. 
1949. 
1950 
1951. 
1952. 
1953. 
1954. 
1955. 



250,226 


108,823 


141,403 


202,482 


78,168 


124,314 


47,744 


30,655 


17,089 


251,821 


108,906 


142,915 


201,803 


77,725 


124,078 


50,018 


31,181 


18,837 


261,225 


111,486 


149,739 


208,505 


80,069 


128,436 


52,720 


31,417 


21,303 


273,038 


113,904 


159,134 


218,173 


81,872 


136,301 


54,865 


32,032 


22,833 


287,879 


116,996 


170,883 


230,315 


84,401 


145,914 


57,564 


32,595 


24,969 


302,040 


119,056 


182,984 


241,106 


86,019 


155,087 


60,934 


33,037 


27,897 


317,556 


121,662 


195,894 


253,061 


88,381 


164,680 


64,495 


33,281 


31,214 


339,728 


127,812 


211,916 


271,745 


93,697 


178,048 


67,983 


34,115 


33,868 


364,451 


133,057 


231,394 


291,890 


97,771 


194,119 


72,561 


35,286 


37,275 


386,103 


137,032 


249,071 


305,860 


100,560 


205,300 


80,243 


36,472 


43,771 



TOTAL HIGH 



1946. 
1947. 
1948. 
1949. 
1950. 
1951. 
1952. 
1953. 
1954. 
1955. 



106,669 
111,282 
114,166 
117,829 
125,852 
138,965 
146,684 
155,815 
164,978 
180,797 



41,232 
42,037 
42,964 
42,800 
44,079 
46,080 
47,658 
49,517 
51,696 
55,414 



65,437 
69,245 
71,202 
75,029 
81,773 
92,885 
99,026 
106,298 
113,282 
125,383 



95,108 
99,370 
101,644 
105,230 
113,608 
126,426 
133,663 
142,438 
151,448 
166,146 



34,383 
35,424 
35,656 
35,604 
36,964 
38,929 
40,301 
42,238 
44,109 
47,611 



60,725 
63,946 
65,988 
69,626 
76,644 
87,497 
93,362 
100,200 
107,339 
118,535 



11,561 
11,912 
12,522 
12,599 
12,244 
12,539 
13,021 
13,377 
13,530 
14,651 



6,849 
6,613 
7,308 
7,196 
7,115 
7,151 
7,357 
7,279 
7,587 
7,803 



* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 

For detail, see TABLES II, III, and IV. 



70 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 5 — Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color : State 

of Maryland: 1946-1955 



Year 


Total 


PUBLICt 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL WHITE 



1946 


290,037 


113,021 


177,016 


232,959 


77,086 


155,873 


57,078 


35,935 


21,143 


1947 


293,926 


112,648 


181,278 


234,463 


76,471 


157,992 


59,463 


36,177 


23,286 


1948 


303,912 


114,688 


189,224 


241,251 


77,702 


163,549 


62,661 


36,986 


25,675 


1949 


317,344 


116,220 


201,124 


252,463 


78,762 


173,701 


64,881 


37,458 


27,423 


1960 


336,196 


118,071 


218,125 


269,070 


80,140 


188,930 


67,126 


37,931 


29,195 


1951 


360,258 


120,646 


239,612 


289,473 


82,165 


207,308 


70,785 


38,481 


32,304 


1952 


380,415 


122,658 


257,757 


305,650 


83,695 


221,955 


74,765 


38,963 


35,802 


1953 


406,893 


127,265 


279,628 


328,176 


87,558 


240,618 


78,717 


39,707 


39,010 


1954 


435,126 


130,266 


304,860 


351,710 


89,125 


262,585 


83,416 


41,141 


42,275 


1955 






332,842 






283,056 


92,426 


42,640 


49,786 























WHITE ELEMENTARY 



1946 


198,358 


79,779 


118,579 


152,630 


50,482 


102,148 


45,728 


29,297 


16,431 


1947 


199,229 


79,458 


119,771 


151,491 


49,707 


101,784 


47,738 


29,751 


17,987 


1948 


207,227 


80,947 


126,280 


156,863 


51,073 


105,790 


50,364 


29,874 


20,490 


1949 


217,916 


82,871 


135,045 


165,402 


52,406 


112,996 


52,514 


30,465 


22,049 


1950 


230,659 


84,335 


146,324 


175,502 


53,280 


122,222 


55,157 


31,055 


24,102 


1951 


243,916 


85,689 


158,227 


185,451 


54,171 


131,280 


58,465 


31,518 


26,947 


1952 


258,213 


87,176 


171,037 


196,258 


55,392 


140,866 


61,955 


31,784 


30,171 


1953 


278,025 


91,270 


186,755 


212,451 


58,644 


153,807 


65,574 


32,626 


32,948 


1954 


299,004 


93,314 


205,690 


228,890 


59,569 


169,321 


70,114 


33,745 


36,369 


1955 






222,522 







179,542 


78,022 


35,042 


42,980 























WHITE HIGH 



1946 


91,679 


33,242 


58,437 


80,329 


26,604 


53,725 


11,350 


6,638 




1947 


94,697 


33,190 


61,507 


82,972 


26,764 


56,208 


11,725 


6,426 


5,299 


1948 


96,685 


33,741 


62,944 


84,388 


26,629 


57,759 


12,297 


7,112 


5,185 


1949 


99,428 


33,349 


66,079 


87,061 


26,356 


60,705 


12,367 


6,993 


5,374 


1950 


105,537 


33,736 


71,801 


93,568 


26,860 


66,708 


11,969 


6,876 


5,093 


1951 


116,342 


34,957 


81,385 


104,022 


27,994 


76,028 


12,320 


6,963 


5,357 


1952 


122,202 


35,482 


86,720 


| 109,392 


28,303 


81,089 


12,810 


7,179 


5,631 


1953 


128,868 


35,995 


92,873 ■ 


115,725 


28,914 


86,811 


13,143 


7,081 


6,062 


1954 


136,122 


36,952 


99,170 


122,820 


29,556 


93,264 


13,302 


7,396 


5,906 


1955 






110,320 






103,514 


14,404 


7,598 


6,806 





















* Includps pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges, 
t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 
NOTE: Break-down for Baltimore City not available for 1954-55. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



71 



TABLE 6— Number of Different Pupils in Public and Nonpublic Schools by Color : State 

of Maryland : 1946-1955 



Year 


Total 


Public! 


Nonpublic 


Ending 




















June 30 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties* 


State 


City 


Counties 



TOTAL COLORED 



1946 


66,858 


37,034 


29,824 


64,631 


35,465 


29,166 


2,227 


1,569 


658 


1947 


69,177 


38,295 


30,882 


66,710 


36,678 


30,032 


2,467 


1,617 


850 


1948 


71,479 


39,762 


31,717 


68,898 
70,940 


38,023 


30,875 


2,581 


1,739 


842 


1949 


73,523 


40,484 


33,039 


38,714 


32,226 


2,583 


1,770 


813 


1950 


77,535 


43,004 


34,531 


74,853 


41,225 


33,628 


2,682 


1,779 


903 


1951 


80,747 


44,490 


36,257 


78,059 


42,783 


35,276 


2,688 


1,707 


981 


1952 


83,825 


46,662 


37,163 


81,074 


44,987 


36,087 


2,751 


1,675 


1,076 


1953 


88,650 


50,064 


38,586 


86,007 


48,377 


37,630 


2,643 


1,687 


956 


1954 


94,303 


54,487 


39,816 


91,628 


52,755 


38,873 


2,675 


1,732 


943 


1955 




41,612 






40,779 


2,468 


1,635 


833 















COLORED ELEMENTARY 



1946 


51,868 


29,044 


22,824 


49,852 


27,686 


22,166 


2,016 


1,358 


658 


1947 


52,592 


29,448 


23,144 


50,312 


28,018 


22,294 


2,280 


1,430 


850 


1948 


53,998 


30,539 


23,459 


51,642 


28,996 


22,646 


2,356 


1,543 


813 


1949 


55,122 


31,033 


24,089 


52,771 


29,466 


23,305 


2,351 


1,567 


784 


1950 


57,220 


32,661 


24,559 


54,813 


31,121 


23,692 


2,407 


1,540 


867 


1951 


58,124 


33,367 


24,757 


55,655 


31,848 


23,807 


2,469 


1,519 


950 


1952 


59,343 


34,486 


24,857 


56,803 


32,989 


23,814 


2,540 


1,497 


1,043 


1953 


61,703 


36,542 


25,161 


59,294 


35,053 


24,241 


2,409 


1,489 


920 


1954 


65,447 


39,743 


25,704 


63,000 


38,202 


24,798 


2,447 


1,541 


906 


1955 


26.549 


25,758 


2,221 


1,430 


791 













COLORED HIGH 



1946 


14,990 


7,990 


7,000 


14,779 


7,779 


7,000 


211 


211 




1947 


16,585 


8,847 


7,738 


16,398 


8,660 


7,738 


187 


187 




1948 


17,481 


9,223 


8,258 


17,256 


9,027 


8,229 


225 


196 


29 


1949 


18,401 


9,451 


8,950 


18,169 


9,248 


8,921 


232 


203 


29 


1950 


20,315 


10,343 


9,972 


20,040 


10,104 


9,936 


275 


239 


36 


1951 


22,623 


11,123 


11,500 


22,404 


10,935 


11,469 


219 


188 


31 


1952 


24,482 


12,176 


12,306 


24,271 


11,998 


12,273 


211 


178 


33 


1953 


26,947 


13,522 


13,425 


26,713 


13,324 


13,389 


234 


198 


36 


1954 


28,856 


14,744 


14,112 


28,628 


14,553 


14,075 


228 


191 


37 


T955 


15,063 


15,021 


247 


205 


42 













* Includes pupils in elementary schools of State Teachers Colleges. 

t Excludes duplicates among counties and Baltimore City in public schools. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available for 1954-55. 



72 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 7 

Program for Education of Handicapped Children in Maryland Financed with State Funds 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties. . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



Total 



Pupils 



2,216 

1 ,225 

991 

48 
102 
279 
7 
7 

22 
20 
13 
18 
19 

13 
62 
17 
4 

134 

136 
7 
11 
5 
11 

24 
22 
10 



Ex- 
penditures 



*$541,813.99 

*355,288.14 

*186,525.85 

3,262.24 
12,496.12 
*84,755.19 
234.22 
582.52 

3,648.07 
1,986.90 
922.51 
985.89 
2,164.64 

159.09 
2,981.05 
2,342.06 

309.78 
34,884.85 

24,461.20 
1,083.48 
1,062.89 
598.46 
1,133.29 

3,449.09 
2,558.05 
464.26 



Home and Hospital 
Instruction 



Pupils 



ttl ,291 

541 

tt750 

48 
f90 
148 
7 
7 

18 
19 
13 
18 
18 

13 
60 
14 
4 
84 

tl06 
6 
11 

5 
10 

21 
+20 
10 



Teachers 



306 

20 

286 

15 
28 
46 
3 
4 

7 
11 

5 
2 

10 

3 
33 
7 
3 
33 

40 
4 
1 
4 

6 

2 
10 



Ex- 
penditures 



$86,194.46 

34,656.47 

51,537.99 

3,262.24 
5,571.12 
10,973.66 
234.22 
582.52 

1,548.07 
1,386.90 
922.51 
985.89 
1,564.64 

159.09 
1,781.05 
542.06 
309.78 
7,229.85 

8,034.87 
483.48 

1,062.89 
598.46 
533.29 

1,949.09 
1,358.05 
464.26 



Instruction In Special 
Schools 



Pupils 



925 
684 
241 



12 
131 



50 



* This includes $3,805.54 for transportation of 24 handicapped children to regular day school as follows: 
Baltimore City: $2,564.53 for 6 pupils; Baltimore County: $1,241.01 for 18 pupils. 
Similar expenditures in equalization counties are included in the minimum program. 

+ Includes 7 pupils receiving instruction through a school-to-home telephone system as follows: 
Anne Arundel, 1; Prince George's, 3; Wicomico, 3. 

X Includes 192 county children in Baltimore City hospital schools. 

Note: These pupils are in addition to those reported in special classes in TABLES 19, 20, and 21. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



73 



TABLE 8 

Special Classes and Schools : Baltimore City : Semester Ending June 30, 1955 



Kind of Class or School 


Number of 
Classes 


Net Roll 


Average 
Net Roll 


Per Cent of 
Attendance 


physically handic 


CAPPED PUPII 


,S 





Total and Average 

Cerebral Palsy 

Deaf 

Hearing Conservation . . 
Orthopedic and Cardiac 
Sight Conservation .... 
Mixed* 




88.5 
84.5 
83.5 
91.0 
88.0 
89.7 
94.0 



MENTALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 



Total and Average 


190 


3,806 


3,820 


81 


8 


Opportunity 


106 


2,096 


2,092 


84 


7 


Shop Center 


79 


1,637 


1,657 


75 


7 




5 


73 


71 


85 


1 



SOCIALLY HANDICAPPED PUPILS 



Bragg School 

Highwood School 


7 
3 
4 


102 
44 

58 


101 
44 

57 


73.0 
75.1 
70.8 


TRAINABLE PUPILS 


Schools No. 51, 176, 302 


4 


42 


42 


54.0 



* Junior high school classes consisting of pupils with the following deficiences: orthopedic 26; cerebral 
palsy 2; cardiac 4; and sight conservation 5. 



74 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 9 — Number of Pupils*: Maryland Schools and Institutions for 
Atypical Children: Year Ending June 30, 1955 







Number of Pupils 




Total 












Number 


Name and Location 










of 




Kinder- 


Ele- 






Different 




garten 


mentary 


Secondary 


Special 


Teachers 



WHITE 



Child Study Center, Baltimore 

Children's Guild, Baltimore 








23 


4 








5 


2 


Children's Rehabilitation Institute, 












Cockeysville 








36 


8 










28 


5 


Garden School, Baltimore 








5 


1 


fMaryland School for Blind, Baltimore 


31 


82 


34 




28 


Maryland School for Deaf, Frederick 


11 


105 


22 




18 


Maryland Training School for Boys, 












Loch Raven 




344 


64 




21 


Montrose School for Girls, Reisterstown .... 




51 


40 




14 


Nursery School for Cerebral Palsy Baltimore 








34 


3 


Reinhardt School for Deaf, Kensington 








30 


2 


Rosewood State Training School, 












Owings Mills 


76 


1» 






13 


School of Chimes, Baltimore 








68 


7 


Twin Maples, Baltimore 








40 


5 


COLORED 


Barrett School for Girls, Glen Burnie 

Boys' Village of Maryland, Inc., Cheltenham . 
Maryland School for Blind, Baltimore 

Deot. for Colored Deaf 




45 
192 

19 


25 




9 
10 



* Figures furnished by principals of schools, 
t Integrated. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



75 



TABLE 10— Total Resident Births in Maryland: 1945-1954 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



Total Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Total State 


42,816 


50,733 


56,827 


54,092 


54,048 


55,992 


61,081 


63,165 


64,523 


67,445 


Baltimore City . . . 


1 1 QA Q 
1 ( ,848 


91 111 


OQ QQO 




91 AQR 


91 QQ9 
Z1,9SZ 


99 CQfl 


99 r 77K 
I/O 


99 TAQ 


90 C9«J 


Total Counties . . . 


24,968 


29,622 


32,835 


32,009 


32,552 


34,610 


38,451 


40,390 


41,775 


43,922 


Allegany 


1,724 


2,257 


2,554 


2,160 


2,009 


1,803 


1,824 


1,785 


1,729 


1,577 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,819 


2,164 


2,474 


2,603 


2,655 


2,873 


2,969 


3,132 


3,444 


3,811 


Baltimore 


5,174 


6,140 


6,867 


6,375 


6,379 


6,661 


7,489 


7,937 


8,547 


9,057 


Calvert 


312 


313 


361 


395 


366 


400 


405 


427 


432 


431 


Caroline 


329 


387 


405 


420 


373 


417 


396 


432 


431 


405 


Carroll 


708 


860 


978 


887 


849 


771 


818 


1,019 


888 


921 


Cecil 


702 


804 


788 


790 


763 


756 


801 


901 


958 


1,054 


Charles 


605 


672 


686 


723 


723 


746 


782 


684 


825 


877 


Dorchester 


462 


526 


613 


574 


555 


559 


630 


585 


597 


632 


Frederick 


1,141 


1,405 


1,478 


1,339 


1,377 


1,342 


1,464 


1,438 


1,430 


1,519 


Garrett 


424 


515 


568 


551 


541 


530 


508 


497 


467 


448 


Harford 


1,090 


1,245 


1,385 


1,353 


1,379 


1,419 


1,645 


1,789 


1,724 


1,855 


Howard 


381 


477 


565 


546 


542 


569 


597 


581 


615 


660 


Kent 


246 


295 


327 


293 


299 


313 


285 


318 


317 


354 


Montgomery . . . 


2,694 


3,073 


3,411 


3,600 


4,000 


4,740 


5,478 


6,113 


6,275 


6,708 


Prince George's. 


2,992 


3,804 


3,996 


4,243 


4,563 


5,508 


7,020 


7,250 


7,566 


7,687 


Queen Anne's . . 


260 


269 


289 


313 


326 


311 


298 


334 


279 


335 


St. Mary's 


708 


679 


736 


781 


824 


883 


916 


881 


1,029 


1,116 


Somerset 


357 


414 


484 


432 


417 


436 


432 


446 


427 


477 


Talbot 


330 


363 


425 


415 


418 


427 


435 


458 


451 


431 


Washington .... 


1,467 


1,730 


1,989 


1,791 


1,760 
866 


1,697 


1,714 


1,794 


1,771 


1,869 


Wicomico 


636 


741 


875 


892 


894 


980 


1,002 


1,019 


1,061 


Worcester 


407 


489 


581 


533 


568 


555 


565 


587 


554 


637 



76 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 11— White Resident Births in Maryland: 1945-1954 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



White Resident Births in Maryland 



County 


1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Total State 


34,678 


41,401 


46,324 


42,651 


42,178 


43,599 


47,992 


50,146 


50,918 


53,204 


Baltimore City . . . 


13,308 


15,805 


17,799 


15,414 


14,507 


14,168 


14,938 


14,989 


14,628 


14,949 


Total Counties . . . 


21,370 


25,596 


28,525 


27,237 


27,671 


29,431 


33,054 


35,157 


36,290 


38,255 


Allegany 


1,691 


2,221 


2,524 


2,126 


1,976 


1,769 


1,792 


1,758 


1,691 


1,540 


Anne Arundel . . 


1,392 


1,693 


1,943 


2,020 


2,034 


2,196 


2,322 


2,467 


2,734 


3,033 




4,751 


5,643 


6,328 


5,737 


5,766 


6,036 


6,932 


7,382 


7,999 


8,560 


Calvert 


156 


137 


156 


179 


168 


148 


160 


186 


196 


169 


Caroline 


248 


302 


310 


323 


276 


319 


300 


325 


313 


301 


Carroll 


666 


816 


930 


840 


805 


725 


778 


922 


840 


881 


Cecil 


652 


748 


735 


717 


707 


695 


737 


834 


883 


979 


Charles 


304 


386 


394 


405 


390 


407 


397 


387 


457 


476 


Dorchester 


298 


360 


412 


368 


324 


317 


350 


342 


324 


370 


Frederick 


1,029 


1,254 


1,338 


1,196 


1,233 


1,189 


1,304 


1,306 


1,282 


1,369 


Garrett 


424 


515 


565 


550 


541 


529 


507 


497 


466 


448 


Harford 


994 


1,133 


1,244 


1,186 


1,202 


1,241 


1,426 


1,557 


1,493 


1,625 




317 


389 


477 


426 


443 


463 


480 


480 


499 


561 


Kent 


166 


214 


240 


216 


211 


231 


204 


224 


209 


258 


Montgomery . . . 


2,463 


2,771 


3,114 


3,289 


3,664 


4,402 


5,122 


5,794 


5,899 


6,343 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 


2,529 


3,273 


3,448 


3,605 


3,918 


4,775 


6,157 


6,430 


6,705 


6,782 


178 


196 


208 


213 


211 


200 


197 


231 


190 


226 


St. Mary's 


540 


475 


557 


564 


615 


659 


690 


675 


812 


877 


Somerset 


199 


256 


297 


256 


217 


240 


226 


243 


223 


264 


Talbot 


220 


235 


296 


271 


282 


290 


281 


293 


301 


270 


Washington. . . . 


1,451 


1,702 


1,950 


1,761 


1,726 


1,647 


1,684 


1,769 


1,731 


1,825 


Wicomico 


471 


571 


684 


663 


633 


628 


686 


733 


735 


736 


Worcester 


231 


306 


375 


326 


329 


325 


322 


322 


308 


362 



Maryland State Department of Education 



77 



TABLE 12— Colored Resident Births in Maryland : 1945-1954 

Data from Division of Vital Records and Statistics, Maryland State Department of Health 



County 



Colored Resident Births in Maryland 





1945 


1946 


1947 


1948 


1949 


1950 


1951 


1952 


1953 


1954 


Total State 


8,138 


9,332 


10,503 


11,441 


11,870 


12,393 


13,089 


13,019 


13,605 


14,241 


Baltimore City . . . 


4 540 


5 306 


6 193 


6 669 


6 989 


7 214 


7 692 


7 786 


8 120 


8 574 


Total Counties . . . 


3,598 


4,026 


4,310 


4,772 


4,881 


5,179 


5,397 


5,233 


5,485 


5,667 


Allegany 


33 


36 


30 


34 


33 


34 


32 


27 


38 


37 


Anne Arundel . . 


427 


471 


531 


583 


621 


677 


647 


665 


710 


778 


Baltimore 


423 


497 


539 


638 


613 


625 


557 


555 


548 


497 


Calvert 


156 


176 


205 


216 


198 


252 


245 


241 


236 


262 


Caroline 


81 


85 


95 


97 


97 


98 


96 


107 


118 


104 


Carroll 


42 


44 


48 


47 


44 


46 


40 


97 


48 


40 


Cecil 


50 


56 


53 


73 


56 


61 


64 


67 


75 


75 


Charles 


301 


286 


292 


318 


333 


339 


385 


297 


368 


401 




164 


166 


201 


206 


231 


242 


280 


243 


273 


262 


Frederick 


112 


151 


140 


143 


144 


153 


160 


132 


148 


150 


Garrett 






3 






1 


1 




1 




Harford 


96 


U2 


141 


167 


177 


178 


219 


232 


231 


230 




64 


88 


88 


120 


99 


106 


117 


101 


116 


99 


Kent 


80 


81 


87 


77 


88 


82 


81 


94 


108 


96 


Montgomery . . . 


231 


302 


297 


311 


336 


338 


356 


319 


376 


365 


Prince George's . 


463 


531 


548 


638 


645 


733 


863 


820 


861 


905 


Queen Anne's . . 


82 


73 


81 


100 


115 


111 


101 


103 


89 


109 


St. Mary's 


168 


204 


179 


217 


209 


224 


226 


206 


217 


239 




158 


158 


187 


176 


200 


196 


206 


203 


204 


213 


Talbot 


110 


128 


129 


144 


136 


137 


154 


165 


150 


161 


Washington. . . . 


16 


28 


39 


30 


34 


50 


30 


25 


40 


44 




165 


170 


191 


229 


233 


266 


294 


269 


284 


325 


Worcester 


176 


183 


206 


207 


239 


230 


243 


265 


246 


275 



78 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 13 



Withdrawals* from Public Schools : Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 







Withdrawals by CoDEf 


County 


Total 


Transferred to 
Other Schools 


























Wl 


W2 


W3&4 


W7 


W13 


W5 


W6 


W8 


W9 


W10 


Wll 


W12 


W14 


ELEMENTARY 


Total Counties 


19,841 


7,516 


381 


11,221 


58 


43 


144 




19 


38 


393 


28 






Allegany 


618 


303 


7 


280 


1 


2 


3 








22 








Anne Arundel 


1,833 


546 


46 


1,172 


13 


3 


17 




i 


5 


30 








Baltimore 


3,195 


1,176 


66 


1,845 


14 


12 


19 






6 


57 








Calvert 


183 


66 




107 


1 








1 


1 


6 


1 






Caroline 


199 


51 




141 


1 








1 


1 


4 








Carroll 


442 


146 


2 


278 


1 


2 


3 








10 








Cecil 


693 


284 


5 


381 


5 


1 


7 






i 


9 








Charles 


358 


141 


7 


186 




3 


6 




5 




9 


1 








167 


49 




103 




1 






1 


3 


10 








Frederick 


581 


324 


i 


221 


3 


4 


2 






2 


23 


i 






Garrett 


203 


54 




133 




2 






1 




12 


l 






Harford 


1,197 


454 


3 


708 




1 


2 




1 




28 










394 


86 


9 


292 






4 








3 








Kent 


86 


20 




63 






1 




i 






i 








3,559 


1,529 


168 


1,747 


4 


5 


43 




4 


5 


41 


13 






Prince George's . . . 


3,521 


1,245 


39 


2,158 


12 


5 


10 






6 


45 


1 






Queen Anne's 


130 


48 




79 














3 








St. Mary's 


533 


123 


16 


383 






"a 




i 




6 










196 


55 




135 






1 




2 


1 


2 








Talbot 


167 


47 




107 




2 


3 








7 








Washington 


834 


502 


9 


260 


i 




17 








36 


9 








456 


198 


3 


233 


i 




2 






5 


14 








Worcester 


296 


69 




209 












2 


16 









HIGH 



Total Counties 


9,598 


1,197 


72 


3,443 


210 


29 


144 


237 


3,346 


25 


423 


56 


408 


8 


Allegany 


466 


70 


9 


138 


12 


1 


7 


15 


158 




21 


1 


34 




Anne Arundel 


880 


73 


7 


304 


25 


2 


8 


24 


355 


"a 


38 


4 


36 




Baltimore 


1,734 


171 


18 


641 


34 


4 


52 


57 


603 


6 


61 


16 


70 




Calvert 


85 


4 




26 


2 








39 




9 


2 


3 




Caroline 


140 


9 




52 


2 


1 


i 


4 


58 




11 




2 




Carroll 


265 


31 




107 


9 




10 


3 


95 


2 


5 




3 




Cecil 


236 


22 




87 


3 




3 


3 


95 


1 


10 




11 




Charles 


196 


27 




53 


1 


2 


1 


4 


83 


1 


14 


1 


4 






146 


4 




42 


9 






2 


56 




18 


5 


10 




Frederick 


309 


59 




64 


2 


1 


2 


6 


148 




9 


3 


13 


2 


Garrett. 


107 


3 




35 


1 


1 




3 


45 




9 


2 


8 




Harford 


470 


73 




224 


9 


1 


5 


6 


109 


i 


17 


4 


19 




Howard 


234 


20 




78 


4 


1 


1 


7 


93 




17 


3 


10 




Kent 


75 


6 




28 


2 


1 




1 


20 




9 


1 


7 




Montgomery 


1,101 


196 


is 


497 


19 


3 


25 


26 


238 


7 


37 


4 


30 


4 


Prince George's . . 


1,737 


233 


6 


676 


42 


5 


12 


48 


585 


2 


47 




81 




Queen Anne's 


94 


9 




21 


3 






1 


39 




13 


3 


5 






180 


12 


8 


86 


1 




1 


5 


61 




2 


2 


2 




Somerset 


116 


6 




31 




2 


4 


4 


57 




5 




7 




Talbot 


100 


4 




30 


5 




1 




41 




13 




6 




Washington 


553 


153 


2 


85 


18 




5 


7 


233 




21 


5 


24 






216 


7 




69 


4 


2 


3 


9 


85 




23 




13 




Worcester 


158 


5 




69 




2 


3 


2 


50 




14 




10 





* Withdrawals who did not re-enter during 1954-55 the school from which they withdrew, 
t Codes: Wl — Transferred — Public school in county; W6 — Armed services; 

W2 — Transferred — Nonpublic school in countv; W8 — Age 16 or over; 

WS <v 4 Transferred— Outside county; W9— Mental; 

W7 — Committed to institution: W10 — Physical; 

W13— Death; Wl t— Economic; 

W5 — Special case; W12 — Marriage; 

W14 — Suspended. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



79 



TABLE 14 

Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal : Counties of Maryland : 

1946—1955 



I hiAK EjNUlPi\x 


Average Number Belonging per Teacher and 


Principal 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Elementary* 


High 


Elementary* 


High 


1946 


35.2 


23.5 


35.7 


25 5 


1947 


34.6 


22.8 


35.4 


24.4 


1948 


33.9 


21.6 


35.6 


23 1 


1949 


34.0 


21.6 


34.7 


22.7 


1950 


34.0 


21.9 


35.1 


22.5 


1951 


33.7 


21.9 


34.7 


21.2 


1952 


32.1 


21.5 


33.2 


20.9 


1953 


31.4 


21.6 


32.0 


21.2 


1954 


31.0 


21.8 


31.4 


20.7 


1955 


27.8 


23.1 


30.2 


21.3 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 



TABLE 15 



Average Number Belonging per Teacher and Principal: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


Elementary Schools* 


High Schools 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


High 


Total State 


28.8 










22 


7 








Baltimore City 


30.8 










22 


3 








Total Counties 


28.1 


27 


8 


30 


2 


22 


9 


23 


1 


21 3 


Allegany 


28.3 


28 


3 


27 


9 


22 


9 


22 


7 


16.8 


Anne Arundel 


28.9 


28 


5 


30 


9 


23 


2 


22 


7 


25.5 


Baltimore 


25.1 


25 


2 


24 





32 


3 


32 


8 


27.5 


Calvert 


30.0 


28 


3 


31 


7 


20 




19 


7 


20.8 


Caroline 


29.8 


29 


3 


31 


6 


18 


3 


18 


1 


19.0 


Carroll 


31.0 


31 





30 


7 


20 


7 


20 


9 


18.8 


Cecil 


30.1 


30 


1 


30 


6 


19 


8 


19 


9 


17.9 


Charles 


29.3 


28 


8 


29 


8 


20 


3 


20 


5 


20.1 


Dorchester 


32 2 


28 


9 


40 


8 


20 


1 


20 


7 


18 6 


Frederick 


33.4 


33 


3 


34 


3 


23 


2 


23 


2 


22 9 


Garrett 


28.2 


28 


2 






23 


2 


23 


2 




Harford 


30.9 


30 


3 


37 


6 


21 


6 


21 


9 


i9.7 


Howard 


29.7 


29 


3 


31 


3 


18 


5 


18 


3 


19.9 


Kent 


29.4 


29 


3 


29 


7 


18 


9 


18 


6 


19.5 


Montgomery 


25.6 


25 


4 


29 


4 


20 


4 


20 


5 


18.1 


Prince George's 


29.3 


29 


4 


28 


4 


22 


4 


22 


7 


21.0 


Queen Anne's 


28.9 


28 


3 


30 


7 


18 


2 


17 


7 


19.4 


St. Mary's 


28.9 


27 


9 


31 


7 


21 


3 


21 


5 


21.0 


Somerset 


28.9 


27 


5 


31 


3 


19 


6 


19 


1 


20.4 


Talbot 


28.4 


27 


5 


30 


3 


20 


6 


20 


7 


20.2 




29.9 


29 


9 


27 


8 


22 





22 


1 


17.1 




30.8 


30 


8 


30 


7 


23 


1 


23 





23.7 




29.2 


27 


1 


33 




19 


4 


18 


9 


20.4 



* Excludes elementary schools at State Teachers Colleges. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



so 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



81 



TABLE 17 



Number Enrolled by Grade-Color: Maryland Public Schools: Fall of 1954 



Grade 


Total 


White 


Colored 


total state 


Total 


{454,875 

18,193 
51,585 
52,765 
45,536 
40,222 
38,652 
39,680 
37,342 
32,208 
29,035 
24,307 
19,964 
15,962 
6,813 












1 






2 






3 






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5 






6 






7 






8 






9 






10 






11 






12t 






Special Classes 













BALTIMORE CITY 



Total 


1143,688 

12,562 
15,524 
15,458 
12,992 
12,881 
11,231 
11,312 
10,596 
8,794 
7,857 
6,733 
5,271 
4,193 
5,673 












1 






2 






3 






4 






5 






6 






7 






8 






9 






10 






11 






12t 






Special Classes 













TOTAL COUNTIES 



Total 


311,187 


271,402 


39,785 


Kindergarten 


5,631 


5,379 


252 


1 


36,061 


31,069 


4,992 


2 


37,307 


32,769 


4,538 


3 


32,544 


28,546 


3,998 


4 


27,341 


23,738 


3,603 


5 


27,421 


23,807 


3,614 


6 


28,368 


24,642 


3,726 


7 


26,746 


23,246 


3,500 


8 


23,414 


20,099 


3,315 


9 


21,178 


18,305 


2,873 


10 


17,574 


15,330 


2,244 


11 


14,693 


12,983 


1,710 


12t 


11,769 


10,527 


1,242 


Special Classes 


1,140 


962 


178 



* Includes enrollment in prekindergarten classes. 

t Includes postgraduates. 

t Includes 2,611 ungraded vocational pupils. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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1/20,126 
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1 ,316 
1 ,543 
4 ,503 

1 ,907 

3 ,948 

1 ,731 
821 

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933 
974 
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2 ,236 
1 ,235 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



87 



TABLE 23 — Number and Per Cent of Nonpromotions in First Grade*: 
Maryland County Schools : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 




White 


Schools 








Colored 


Schools 




Number 




Per 


Cent 




Number 


Per Cent 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Bovs 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


- 

Total Counties 


1,161 


571 


7 


1 


3 


8 


335 


202 


13 





8.5 


Allegany 


65 


33 


8 


5 


4 


5 


2 


3 


20 





m 

18.7 


Anne Arundel 


145 


72 


10 


8 


5 


7 


47 


28 


13 


4 


8.4 


Baltimore 


246 


118 


7 


4 


3 


9 


14 


7 


5 


4 


3.0 


Calvert 


7 


5 


6 


1 


5 


4 


14 


7 


11 


7 


6.7 


Caroline 


23 


11 


12 


6 


7 




11 


5 


23 


4 


9.8 


Carroll 


26 


13 


5 


6 


2 


9 












Cecil 


80 


31 


15 


9 


6 


7 


' 8 


' 4 


28 


6 


13.8 


Charles 


17 


13 


8 


6 


7 


3 


37 


15 


19 


8 


9.7 




11 


4 


5 


5 


2 


3 


9 


4 


8 


7 


3 6 


Frederick 


4 


4 





7 





7 












Garrett 


16 


14 


6 


5 


5 


5 












Harford 


57 


34 


8 


4 


5 


3 


' i 


"i 


1 


i 


i!i 


Howard 


21 


9 


7 


9 


4 





14 


3 


18 


9 


5.1 


Kent 


23 


12 


18 





9 


5 


2 


1 


5 


4 


2.0 




187 


73 


7 





3 





41 


35 


21 


3 


21.3 


Prince George's 


128 


70 


4 


8 


3 





61 


41 


14 


6 


11.2 


Queen Anne's 


1 


3 





8 


2 


5 












St. Mary's 


11 


10 


6 





5 


1 


15 


5 


17 


6 


6^1 


Somerset 


16 


14 


11 


5 


11 


9 


10 


11 


11 


1 


11.1 


Talbot 


15 


7 


9 


5 


5 


4 


26 


11 


27 


9 


15.5 


Washington 


10 


7 


1 


1 





9 












Wicomico 


40 


11 


10 


7 


3 


3 


14 


16 


10 


9 


11.7 


Worcester 


12 


3 


6 


8 


2 





9 


5 


7 


6 


5.0 



Excludes pupils in first grade of elementary school? of State Teachers Colleges. 



88 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 24— Graduates of Maryland County High Schools— 1946-55 : by County 
and Baltimore City, Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


Grand Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 



BY YEAR, 1946-55 



1945-46 


7,549 


2,909 


4,640 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


740 


268 


472 


1946-47 


8,380 


3,601 


4,779 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


937 


357 


580 


1947-48 


8,548 


3,808 


4,740 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


889 


391 


498 


1948-49 


6,971 


3,142 


3,829 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


780 


342 


438 


1949-50 


4,800 


2,335 


2,465 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


415 


187 


228 


1950-51 


8,288 


3,791 


4,497 


7,382 


3,391 


3,991 


906 


400 


506 


1951-52 


8,878 


4,134 


4,744 


7,968 


3,725 


4,243 


910 


409 


501 


1952-53 


9,695 


4,575 


5,120 


8,609 


4,084 


4,525 


1,086 


491 


595 


1953-54 


10,303 


4,891 


5,412 


9,258 


4,404 


4,854 


1,045 


487 


558 


1954-55 


11,321 


5,449 


5,872 


10,166 


4,874 


5,292 


1,155 


575 


580 



BY COUNTY AND BALTIMORE CITY, 1954-55 



Total State 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 














Baltimore City . 


3,840 


1,864 


1,976 














Total Counties . 


11,321 


5,449 


5,872 


10,166 


4,874 


5,292 


1,155 


575 


580 


Allegany 


978 


488 


490 


968 


481 


487 


10 


Y- : 


3 


Anne Arundel 


800 


368 


432 


642 


290 


352 


158 


78 


80 


Baltimore. . . . 


1,903 


879 


1,024 


1,806 


833 


973 


97 


46 


51 


Calvert 


84 


45 


39 


58 


28 


30 


26 


17 


9 


Caroline 


177 


97 


80 


151 


83 


68 


26 


14 


12 


Carroll 


389 


186 


203 


371 


177 


194 


18 


9 


9 


Cecil 


264 


139 


125 


251 


135 


116 


13 


4 


9 


Charles 


222 


104 


118 


149 


74 


75 


73 


30 


43 


Dorchester. . . 


242 


134 


108 


176 


92 


84 


66 


42 


24 


Frederick. . . . 


529 


240 


289 


500 


224 


276 


29 


16 


13 


Garrett 


215 


102 


113 


215 


102 


113 








Harford 


439 


222 


217 


380 


188 


192 


59 


*34 


25 


Howard 


187 


89 


98 


152 


71 


81 


35 


18 


17 


Kent 


124 


60 


64 


91 


44 


47 


33 


16 


17 


Montgomery* 


1,382 


673 


709 


1,317 


641 


676 


65 


32 


33 


Pr. George'sf. 
Queen Anne's 


1,617 


767 


850 


1,449 


700 


749 


168 


67 


101 


138 


64 


74 


111 


49 


62 


27 


15 


12 


St. Mary's. . . 


120 


54 


66 


97 


42 


55 


23 


12 


11 


Somerset .... 


161 


88 


73 


105 


53 


52 


56 


35 


21 


Talbot 


175 


91 


84 


127 


63 


64 


48 


28 


20 


Washington. . 


721 


339 


382 


705 


332 


373 


16 


7 


9 


Wicomico .... 


276 


132 


144 


214 


105 


109 


62 


27 


35 


Worcester . . . 


178 


88 


90 


131 


67 


64 


47 


21 


26 



* Includes 25 boys, 3 girls, graduates of 1955 summer school, 
t Includes 21 boys, 13 girls, graduates of 1955 summer school. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



89 



TABLE 25— Number and Per Cent of High School Graduates Who Entered State 
Teachers Colleges Fall After Graduation: Counties of Maryland — 1946-1950: 
State of Maryland— 1951-1955 





High School Graduates 


Entrants 


to State 


Teachers Colleges 


Year 


Total 


Boys 


Girls 


Number 


Per Cent 




Boys 


Girls 


Boys J Girls 



total graduates 



1945-46 


7,549 


2,909 


4,640 


61 


179 


2.1 


3.9 


1946-47 


8,380 


3,601 


4,779 


132 


187 


3.7 


3.9 


1947-48 


8,548 


3,808 


4,740 


113 


277 


3.0 


5.8 


1948-49 


6,971 


3,142 


3,829 


160 


315 


5.1 


8.2 


1949-50 


4,800 


2,335 


2,465 


56 


136 


2.4 


5.5 


1950-51* 


12,101 


5,596 


6,505 


110 


315 


2.0 


4.8 


1951-52 


12,352 


5,741 


6,611 


166 


361 


2.9 


5.5 


1952-53 


13,356 


6,256 


7,100 


140 


455 


4.5 


6.4 


1953-54 


14,070 


6,670 


7,400 


163 


446 


2.4 


6.0 


1954-55 


15,161 


7,313 


7,848 


170 


435 


2.3 


5.5 



white graduates 



1945-46 


6,809 


2,641 


4,168 


53 


151 


2.0 


3.6 


1946-47 


7,443 


3,244 


4,199 


121 


148 


3.7 


3.5 


1947-48 


7,659 


3,417 


4,242 


105 


245 


3.1 


5.8 


1948-49 


6,191 


2,800 


3,391 


141 


249 


5.0 


7.3 


1949-50 


4,385 


2,148 


2,237 


51 


113 


2.4 


5.1 


1950-51* 


10,378 


4,905 


5,473 


92 


198 


1.9 


3.6 


1951-52 


10,678 


5,059 


5,619 


141 


219 


2.8 


3.9 


1952-53 


11,444 


5,452 


5,992 


120 


293 


2.2 


4.9 


1953-54 


12,110 


5,842 


6,268 


152 


320 


2.6 


5.1 


1954-55 











COLORED GRADUATES 



1945-46 


740 


268 


472 


8 


28 


3 





5 


9 


1946-47 


937 


357 


580 


11 


39 


3 




6 


7 


1947-48 


889 


391 


498 


8 


32 


2 





6 


4 


1948-49 


780 


342 


438 


19 


66 


5 


5 


15 


1 


1949-50 


415 


187 


228 


5 


23 


2 


7 


10 


1 


1950-51* 


1,723 


691 


1,032 


18 


117 


2 


6 


11 


3 


1951-52 


1,674 


682 


992 


25 


142 


3 


7 


14 


3 


1952-53 


1,912 


804 


1,108 


20 


162 


2 


5 


14 


6 


1953-54 


1,960 


828 


1,132 


11 


126 


1 


3 


11 


1 


1954-55 



















Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 

* Increase due to inclusion of Baltimore City graduates and entrants to Coppin State Teachers College 



90 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 23 — Comparison of Number and Per Cent of Maryland County High School 
Graduates Continuing Education or Staying or Working at Home Year Following 

Graduation: 1945-1954 







Number 


Per Cent 


Year of 
Graduation 


Total Number 
of Graduates 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or Work- 
ing at Home, 
Married 


Continuing 
Education 


Staying or Work- 
ing at Home, 
Married 




Boy3 J Girls 


Boys J Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Gir! 3 



total graduates 



1945 


2,824 


4 462 


j 

518 


I 415 


21 


646 


18.3 


31 


7 


0.7 


14.5 


1946 


2,909 


4.640 


661 


L,377 


45 


511 


22.7 


29 


7 


1.5 


11.0 


1947 


3,612 


4 7S5 


968 


1 4:^4 


91 


893 


26.8 


30 





2.5 


18.7 


1948 


3,810 


4,740 


947 


1 444 


81 


362 


24.9 


30 


5 


2.1 


7.6 


1949 


3,142 


3,829 


861 


1 282 


90 


706 


27.4 


33 


5 


2.9 


18.4 


1950 


2,335 


2,465 


706 


833 


42 


388 


30.2 


33 


8 


1.8 


15.7 


1951 


3,791 


4,497 


1 1,034 


1,389 


96 


719 


27.3 


30 


9 


2.5 


16.0 


1952 


4,134 


4,744 


1,235 


1,419 


57 


740 


29.9 


29 


9 


1.4 


15.6 


1953 


4,575 


5,120 


1,353 


1,641 


135 


911 


29.6 


32 


1 


2.9 


17.8 


1954 


4,891 


5,412 


1,515 


1.755 


54 


891 


31.0 


32 


4 


1.1 


16.5 



WHITE GRADUATES 



1945 


2,545 


3,986 


434 


1,232 


19 


587 


17 


.1 


30.9 





7 


14 


.7 


1946 


2,641 


4,168 


601 


1,218 


36 


420 


22 


.7 


29.2 


1 


4 


10 


.1 


1947 


3,255 


4,205 


901 


1,268 


77 


769 


27 


.7 


30.1 


2 


4 


18 


.3 


1948 


3,419 


4,242 


865 


1,282 


68 


277 


25 


.3 


30.2 


2 





6 


.5 


1949 


2,800 


3,391 


787 


1,143 


78 


654 


28 


.1 


33.7 


2 


8 


19 


.3 


1950 


2,148 


2,237 


655 


761 


42 


328 


30 


.5 


34.0 


1 


9 


14 


7 


1951 


3,391 


3,991 


935 


1,186 


69 


587 


27 


.6 


29.7 


2 





14 


7 


1952 


3,725 


4,243 


1,110 


1,223 


37 


655 


29 


.8 


28.8 


1 





15 


4 


1953 


4,084 


4,525 


1,221 


1,423 


100 


759 


29 


.9 


31.4 


2 


4 


16 


8 


1954 


4,404 


4,854 


1,414 


1,565 


52 


769 


32 


1 


32.2 


1 


2 


15 


8 



COLORED GRADUATES 



1945 


279 


476 


84 


183 


2 


59 


30.1 


38.4 


0.7 


12.4 


1946 


268 


472 


60 


159 


9 


91 


22.4 


33.7 


3.3 


19.3 


1947 


357 


580 


67 


166 


14 


124 


18.8 


28.6 


3.9 


21.4 


1948 


391 


498 


82 


162 


13 


85 


21.0 


32.5 


3.3 


17.1 


1949 


342 


438 


74 


139 


12 


52 


21.6 


31.7 


3.5 


11.9 


1950 


187 


228 


51 


72 




60 


27.3 


31.6 




26.3 


1951 


400 


506 


99 


203 


27 


132 


24.7 


40.1 


6.7 


26.1 


1952 


409 


501 


125 


196 


20 


85 


30.6 


39.1 


4.9 


17.0 


1953 


491 


595 


132 


218 


35 


152 


26.9 


36.6 


7.1 


25.5 


1954 


487 


558 


101 


190 


2 


122 


20.7 


34.1 


0.4 


21.9 



Maryland State Department of Education 



91 



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92 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 





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os eo x x eo 
in CM m t- © 

tM CM rH rH 


rHlOOOCMHt 

©t-xt-os 


•inxos'j' 
• rHxmos 
rH eo 


co © © m © 

rHrHCgrHrH 


os os x 
eg t- os 

CO 


CO 







3 ,827 


O 
10 


■COVO CM rH 
•CMOSXCS 

ton. 


•1< OOrHCM 
•CM CO t> 00 
CM 


• os in in • 

•IOHH . 


1,114 

77 

153 
123 


x • t> 

H? .00 


C01 




pq 


3,869 


CJ 
IO. 


•ICllOCrH 

• ©■«* t-ec 
co m 


•xmt~© 
•cm cot-t- 
eg 


•osxos • 

•XCOrH • 


1 ,009 
82 

198 
114 


X • rH 

m • in 
eg 


c 

_, « 


O 


7,682 




X©tMHS<OS 

ic©ect-t- 

©_t>CMrH 


rnxx 10 co 

rH©Xt-© 
rH rH IC CM CM 


■ th O t- "tf 

• in © t- in 
eg eg rn m 


10 t* os co m 
t— x eg © co 
oj <-h eg x eg 


Tf |> t- 

t-t-x 
x eg 


To 
Enroll 
* 

1 


PQ 


7,459 




CS t- X OS CM 
OS t— CM rH 


rH CO "5 rH IO 

© © m os os 

rHi-H-^CMrH 


• TfCOX© 

•©cm t-eo 

XtMrHH* 


ineginxHi< 
egos«T*TH 
rn rHcgxeg 


egeoT* 
xx-^j< 

XX 


County 


Total Counties: 

Number. . . . 


Per Cent . . . 


Allegany 

Anne Arundel. . . 

Calvert 


Cecil 

Charles 

Frederick 


Garrett 

Harford 

Kent 

Montgomery .... 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . . 
St. Mary's 

Talbot 


Washington 

Wicomico 



mi? 



•ES 

a _j- 

G » 



53W 

c« O 

G 
O CS 



13 .a u p 

•~ oB< 

45 .B § 

HwE 
a o * 

■sis? 

G to ««- 



. 00 rH » 
■OJrH U 
< 



% G « 

E S JS 
c o H 

WUr5 



|o<; 



GS. 
C CS 

<PQC 



: o o 



98 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CO 3 

.5Pj= 
u 

£ 



'2X1 

CO 



eg (3 
5 M 

3 



O—lOC-i-lOOX 

^ lOHtooocain 



.-ii-iw eo <m eo tt eo iH 



C 3 



0313 ® 

E-> to o 

2; 



i <3> CO Tl< tO CO 



coi^t> cc co >* o eo OS uo eo 
n^h tj< oc ti< tj< oi oi eo 



"His g 



Ere < 



W co co 3 U b< 



a 5 

.r a 
fcco 



£T3 - C 

5*3-3 



B 3 



118 9 

t» O 3 3 

bc^ o 3j= 3 



-CO 

I ED 

» TO 
TO 3J 



cu w 73 



I- TO - 

3 cvj: 
IIS 

S o c 
■5 = 2 



8.1- 



£ £ 3 

fas 



Maryland State Department of Education 



99 



TABLE 35 

Pupils Enrolled* in Various English Courses: Maryland County High Schools: 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


English 


7t 


8t 


9t 


iot 


lit 


12t 


OtherJ 


Grand Total 


27,336 


23,989 


21,842 


17,387 


14,721 


11,401 


3,815 


WHITE 


Total Counties 


23,998 


20,690 


18,951 


15,118 


12,978 


10,144 


3,488 


A 11 


1 314 


1 270 


1 323 


1 232 


1 096 


994 




Anne Arundel .... 


L953 


L609 


L449 


L207 


969 


681 


141 


Baltimore 


4,918 


4,169 


3,860 


3,020 


2,525 


1,868 


1,015 


Calvert 


159 


127 


119 


104 


80 


62 




Caroline 


239 


256 


218 


188 


183 


156 




Carroll 


798 


684 


670 


546 


462 


384 


147 


Cecil 


632 


521 


492 


365 


379 


260 




Charles 


335 


248 


233 


207 


150 


153 




Dorchester 


357 


294 


275 


224 


204 


185 


28 


Frederick 


902 


933 


847 


760 


605 


516 


208 


Garrett 


418 


412 


292 


311 


257 


218 


100 


Harford 


1,014 


752 


714 


581 


504 


397 


87 


Howard 


413 


366 


342 


266 


199 


159 


96 


Kent 


168 


178 


146 


117 


126 


93 




Montgomery 


3,267 


2,750 


2,451 


2,035 


1,861 


1,364 


484 


Prince George's. . . 


3,343 


2,814 


2,502 


2,314 


1,985 


1,523 


619 


Queen Anne's .... 


202 


183 


176 


143 


125 


116 


21 


St. Mary's 


194 


173 


202 


168 


120 


110 




Somerset 


208 


209 


172 


141 


121 


109 




Talbot 


224 


246 


192 


158 


147 


135 




Washington 


2,138 


1,823 


1,641 


481 


399 


306 


198 


Wicomico 


544 


437 


422 


337 


291 


214 


117 


Worcester 


258 


236 


213 


213 


190 


141 




COLORED 


Total Counties 


3,338 


3,299 


2,891 


2,269 


1,743 


1,257 


327 


Allegany 


19 


22 


26 


16 


16 


10 




Anne Arundel .... 


451 


401 


360 


286 


233 


173 




Baltimore 


359 


337 


288 


239 


175 


103 


93 


Calvert 


151 


127 


91 


77 


58 


28 


54 


Caroline 


74 


77 


89 


56 


44 


30 




Carroll 


52 


37 


44 


35 


25 


18 




Cecil 


47 


45 


35 


30 


32 


15 






224 


230 


206 


134 


104 


78 




Dorchester 


39 


142 


128 


107 


74 


68 




Frederick 


46 


105 


88 


78 


52 


29 




Garrett 
















Harford 


ii6 


110 


io3 


75 


68 


60 






94 


87 


91 


56 


52 


39 




Kent 


84 


84 


58 


47 


39 


35 






222 


224 


193 


144 


103 


73 




Prince George's. . . 


514 


519 


453 


385 


250 


193 


26 


Queen Anne's .... 


85 


67 


74 


66 


45 


30 




St. Mary's 


126 


99 


93 


63 


45 


26 




Somerset 


149 


145 


112 


81 


79 


62 




Talbot 


122 


109 


84 


70 


63 


50 






37 


33 


31 


18 


21 


16 




Wicomico 


165 


159 


129 


124 


102 


72 


79 


Worcester 


162 


140 


115 


82 


63 


49 


34 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIX. 

X Includes 1,393 taking Journalism; 1,215 taking Public Speaking; and 1,207 taking Dramatics. 



30 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



4 



Business 
Training}: 


ss"33isaa 


if 




1 

Econom- 
ic Geog- 
raphy 


1 ,587 
1 ,547 
1 ,691 
646 
674 
921 
823 
645 
767 
921 


1 


235 
338 
83 
284 
211 
727 
282 
647 
1 ,035 
1 ,059 










United 
States 
History 


8 ,516 

9 ,178 
7 ,231 
6 ,697 
9 ,064 

10 ,476 

10 ,581 

11 ,406 

12 ,358 

13 ,729 


Far 
Eastern 

and 
Latin 
American 
Relations 


SS"SS§SiH 


If 


Modern 


1 ,627 
1 ,330 
907 
344 
182 
410 
250 
308 
211 
275 




I 




World 
History 


6 ,134 
4 ,597 
3 ,824 
8,291 
11 ,006 

10 ,198 
10,609 

11 ,396 

12 ,885 
12 ,744 


Civics 

and 
Social 
Studies 


6 ,452 
5,107 
9 ,334 
10,813 
11 ,311 
13 ,010 

13 ,413 

14 ,593 
15,942 
17 ,080 


Social 
Studies 


8th 
Gradet 




7th 
Gradef 


10,716 
12 ,953 

12 ,840 

13 ,205 

14 ,597 
15,769 
16,414 
17 ,701 
19 ,521 
22 ,657 



:| SS : : : :2S: 



:3 S; 



III s * 8SSS1 %BH M*S« lis 



sSS-S Hals SS8M |S3I9 lis 



Ills! iUSs asiSI $*«S lis 



I 



111=5 111 is S.5S5S IJs 



mm WOM 3S253. =3SIS ill 



IHil 11351 SsSSi ISSH 123 



II ill if Hi II 



i 
t 

II: 



Maryland State Department of Education 



101 



TABLE 37 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Social Studies: Maryland County 
High Schools : by Year, 1948-55, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


Social 

■»— 

2 
a 


Studies 

S 

OS 

u 

o 

XI 

oo 


Civics and Social 
Studies 


World History 


European History 


1 
c« 

£b 

T) B 
* .2 


Prohlems of 
Democracy 


Geography 


Economic 
Geography 


Sociology 


Consumer 
Education 


Negro History 


Personal Problems 
and Psychology 


Business Training}: 


1947 


-48 


1,638 


2,044 


1,384 


645 


81 


928 


678 


252 


356 


83 


180 


79 


25 




1948- 


-49 


1,827 


2,312 


1,606 


1,092 


15 


858 


383 


186 


214 






141 


45 


77 


1949- 


-50 


1,995 


2,446 


1,704 


1,191 


18 


1,072 


499 


294 


128 






87 


130 


104 


1950- 


-51 


2,452 


2,461 


1,765 


1,406 


16 


1,156 


729 


320 


123 


129 


34 


112 


379 


59 


1951- 


-52 ' 


2,882 


2,818 


1,944 


1,205 


20 


1,407 


831 


170 


189 


139 


8 


70 


361 


36 


1952- 


-53 


3,064 


2,959 


2,144 


1,352 


58 


1,410 


907 


206 


282 


158 


24 


39 


294 


112 


1953- 


-54 


3,205 


2,998 


2,197 


1,757 


17 


1,503 


964 


207 


150 


85 


12 


89 


223 


64 


1954- 


-55 


3,338 


3,299 


2,373 


1,713 


46 


1,744 


1,122 


483 


150 


106 


28 


54 


124 


110 



BY COUNTY, 1954-55 



Allegany 


19 


22 


26 




16 


26 


















Anne Arundel . . . 


451 


401 


360 


163 




242 


160 
















Baltimore 


359 


337 


288 


235 




175 


103 
















Calvert 


151 


127 


91 


64 




57 


27 
















Caroline 


74 


77 


79 


47 




46 


28 
















' Carroll 


52 


37 


44 


35 






43 
















Cecil 


47 


45 


35 


28 




32 


14 
















Charles 


224 


230 


198 


21 




103 


67 


96 










23 




Dorchester 


39 


142 






30 


73 






123 


106 










Frederick 


46 


105 




47 




52 


29 


88 














Garrett 






























Harford 


116 


110 


103 


75 




68 


60 




27 












Howard 


94 


87 


91 


56 




53 


38 
















Kent 


84 


84 


58 


47 




39 


35 
















Montgomery .... 


222 


224 


193 


25 




113 


22 












48 




Prince George's . 


514 


519 


453 


385 




250 


192 










54 






Queen Anne's. . . 


85 


67 


74 


66 




45 


30 
















St. Mary's 


126 


99 


93 


63 




33 


38 


















149 


145 


41 


81 




79 


62 


71 










19 




Talbot 


122 


109 




70 




62 


50 


84 














Washington .... 


37 


33 


31 


18 




37 


















Wicomico 


165 


159 




106 




102 


72 


129 






28 




34 


59 


Worcester 


162 


140 


115 


81 




57 


52 


15 















* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIX. 

t Includes classes taught by teachers certified in social studies; the remaining classes in this subject appear in 
TABLE 41. 



102 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 38 

White Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science: Maryland County High Schools: 
by Year, 1946-55, and by County, 1954-55 



Year 
and County 



Science 





8 




c 




£ 




'C 


■ 


w 




u 


"S 


_o 


>» 


en 


eu 


w 



1945-46 


10,575 


6,313 


7,387 


9,050 


738 


238 


105 


4,117 


2,481 


899 


43 


84 


252 


1946-47 


11,314 


10,320 


4,783 


7,233 


462 


290 


405 


4,093 


2,404 


1,124 


28 


40 


233 


1947-48 


11,726 


11,013 


8,773 


2,563 


639 


2,671 


233 


3,121 


2,311 


1,348 


53 


32 


26 


1948-49 


11,433 


11,471 


10,001 


8,490 


841 


204 


186 


3,133 


1,361 


450 


20 






1949-50 


12,806 


12,798 


10,763 


9,428 


895 


34 


293 


3,487 


1,650 


522 


41 






1950-51 


14,943 


14,025 


11,771 


10,608 


1,216 


82 


574 


3,880 


1,946 


849 








1951-52 


15,489 


15,704 


13,365 


11,433 


990 


122 


507 


3,983 


2,136 


839 


53 


13 


14 


1952-53 


13,292 


14,793 


14,899 


12,627 


1,239 


98 


488 


3,951 


1,942 


808 




54 




1953-54 


12,939 


15,034 


15,052 


13,699 


1,462 


71 


589 


4,286 


2,059 


954 


41 


35 


23 


1954-55 


16,409 


17,069 


16,477 


14,931 


1,688 


129 


482 


4,975 


2,195 


1,316 


103 


63 


33 



BY COUNTY, 1954-55 



Allegany. . . . 


1,299 


1,270 


1,138 


1,187 


40 




30 


444 


243 


59 








Anne Arundel 


1,953 


1,609 


1,303 


1,146 


83 




60 


291 


79 


96 


103 






Baltimore. . . 


4,918 


4,169 


3,819 


2,375 


929 




185 


858 


393 










Calvert 


56 


127 


80 


102 


27 






38 












Caroline .... 


239 


255 


182 


219 








79 


36 


49 








Carroll 


798 


684 


657 


537 








170 


86 


157 








Cecil 


596 


522 


471 


368 


40 






127 


68 


51 








Charles 


335 


248 


232 


208 


31 






50 


29 


9 








Dorchester. . 


359 


293 


241 


209 








53 


55 


34 








Frederick . . . 


469 


125 


418 


748 


45 


86 




356 


185 


27 








Garrett 


418 


412 


207 


312 


85 






95 


46 


33 








Harford .... 


1,014 


752 


710 


572 


10 






183 


57 


57 








Howard .... 


412 


367 


342 


272 








51 


28 


23 








Kent 


168 


178 


146 


120 








25 


31 


50 








Montgomery 


14 


2,718 


1,688 


1,975 


159 


40 


207 


886 


260 


44 




63 




Pr. George's 


769 


775 


2,524 


2,378 


162 






637 


226 


185 








Queen Anne's 


202 


183 


135 


143 








42 


35 










St. Mary's . . 


184 


173 


195 


168 








45 


23 


39 








Somerset. . . . 


208 


209 


155 


152 








54 


14 


39 








Talbot 


224 


246 


180 


141 


26 






48 


35 


15 








Washington . 


972 


1,082 


1,041 


1,111 




3 




268 


119 


324 






33 


Wicomico . . 


544 


437 


438 


288 








150 


72 










Worcester. . . 


258 


235 


175 


200 


51 






25 


75 


25 









* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIX. 
% Offered for the first time in 1942-43 as pre-induction courses. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



103 



TABLE 39 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Science : Maryland County High 
Schools: by Year, 1948-55, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


7th Gradet 

CO 


>nce 

n 
sd 
>- 

a 

oo 


General Science 


Biology 


Related Science 


Applied Science 


Chemistry 


Physics 


Senior Science 


H 

s 
a 


1947-48 


1,353 


1,864 


1,409 


664 


26 


243 


639 


298 


241 


181 


1948-49 


1,543 


1,911 


1,544 


1,265 


78 


89 


549 


156 


279 


33 


1949-50 


1,741 


2,167 


1,528 


1,190 


57 


157 


581 


307 


92 


61 


1950-51 


1,557 


1,733 


1,919 


1,673 


130 


201 


771 


403 


172 


92 


1951-52 


2,241 


2,230 


2,128 


1,553 


225 


250 


697 


356 


123 


19 


1952-53 


1,965 


2,166 


2,398 


1,612 


310 


103 


679 


379 


57 


50 


1953-54 


1,915 


2,203 


2,664 


1,881 


367 


186 


613 


261 


170 


22 


1954-55 


2,110 


2,366 


2,771 


1,855 


323 


295 


706 


295 


95 





BY COUNTY, 1954-55 



Allegany 


19 


22 


26 


16 








12 






Anne Arundel 






364 


232 


146 




49 


28 






Baltimore 


338 


337 


288 


209 




124 


81 








Calvert 


151 


127 


93 


89 








16 


25 




Caroline 


73 


77 


76 


53 














Carroll 


52 


37 


44 


35 


18 




25 








Cecil 


47 


45 


35 


28 


35 




33 








Charles 


227 


224 


140 


140 


35 




18 


22 






Dorchester 


39 


142 


123 


106 






44 




23 




Frederick 


46 


105 


88 


46 






12 




5 




Garrett 
























55 


50 


io3 


75 




42 


16 


44 


26 




Howard 


94 


87 


91 


56 






22 








Kent 


84 


84 


58 


47 








30 






Montgomery 




224 


175 


26 


3i 




21 




16 




Prince George's . . . 


82 


53 


458 


232 


31 


129 


98 


38 








85 


67 


74 


31 






20 










126 


99 


93 


63 






36 










106 


145 


112 


81 


27 




52 


43 






Talbot 


122 


109 


84 


70 






42 


29 






Washington 


37 


33 


31 


18 






37 








Wicomico 


165 


159 


100 


121 






88 


18 






Worcester 


162 


140 


115 


81 






12 


15 







* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution, 
t Includes pupils taking Core as shown by school in TABLE XXIX. 
j If given in other than 7th and/or 8th grades. 



)4 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



Commer- 
cial and 
Business 
Arith- 
meticj 


ran 




SS : :8 SS : : : :| :8S S :gSS g : : 


1- 


Applied 
Mathe- 
matics 






2§ : : : :S§ :g : :SS3 :2 : : :S : S : : 

W y-> -m ... ■ tH • - 


Mathe- 
matics 
Review 


isliSI§§§§ 




10 . . ... 


Solid 
Geometry 


SsSSssllll 






If 


tOtO<CO>005)H05 0> 




SgS2S 2S2°>| SS 00 :g 5£ : 


a 


3,596 
3,034 
3,214 
2,183 
3 9 54 
3,468 
3,479 
3,933 
4,394 
4,772 


10 


||gSS8 gWSg S§££§ 


Algebra II 


2,834 
2,847 
1,508 
2,387 
2 437 
2',723 
2,994 
3,335 
3,985 
4,190 


TY, 1954-5 


K5 M 3S»2 *l 8Sj s E5 H 


Algebra I 


isium 


BY COUN 


|l|Jg 3 |g Sg 8 SgSS| |sh« 5s2 


General 
Mathe- 
matics II 


1,620 
1,434 
233 
303 
418 
732 
699 
251 
515 
789 




: : : 2 :g : : : § ;X : : 8 j : 


General 
Mathe- 
matics I 


mills 




760 
862 
3,737 
70 
100 

402 
319 
149 
180 
559 

222 
439 
262 
108 
812 

1,040 
47 
139 
129 
115 

717 
191 
137 




8th Gradet 


6,422 
11,789 
12,491 
12,823 
14,039 
15)335 
16,737 
16,609 
18,502 
20,160 




glial ISS2I 3B'1S| gSS83 pi 




7th Gradet 


10,742 
12,107 
12,263 
13,350 
14,495 
16,333 
17,070 
17,600 
19,399 
23,306 




||pi gSIH 111 


Year 

and County 


1945 46 

1946 47 

1947- 48 

1948- 49 

1949- 50 

1950- 51 

1951- 52 

1952- 53 

1953- 54 

1954- 55 




Allegany 

Anne Arundel . . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Dorchester 

Howard 

Kent 

Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



i 



y 



1 

1 
1 



Maryland State Department of Education 



105 



TABLE 41 

Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Various Branches of Mathematics and Business 
Education: Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-55, and by 
County, Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Ybak and 
County 



Mathematics 



C °3 

IS 
C3TJ 



> 



1947-48 


1,612 


1,962 


1,222 


195 


921 


319 


58 


344 


356 


422 


229 


1948-49 


1,819 


2,229 


1,396 


123 


1,001 


311 


35 


329 


176 


380 


386 


1949-50 


1,995 


2,331 


1,467 


187 


1,028 


330 


14 


394 


145 


556 


474 


1950-51 


2,471 


2,500 


1,459 


382 


1,153 


449 


19 


325 


513 


584 


656 


1951-52 


2,877 


2,823 


1,742 


116 


959 


287 


79 


353 


551 


632 


897 


1952-53 


3,069 


2,928 


2,186 


172 


1,010 


311 


96 


451 


324 


354 


1,016 


1953-54 


3,306 


3,124 


2,450 


151 


1,223 


439 


131 


438 


216 


387 


1,416 


1954-55 


3,321 


3,293 


2,490 


72 


1,348 


451 


144 


465 


386 


482 


1,627 



BY COUNTY, 1954-55 



Allegany 


19 


23 


26 












14 






Anne Arundel 


451 


399 


360 




225 


74 


47 


96 






165 




338 


337 


288 




65 


62 




67 


44 




186 


Calvert 


151 


127 


67 




39 


7 




25 






65 


Caroline 


74 


77 


55 




38 


12 


9 


21 


is 




68 


Carroll 


52 


37 


38 




6 


26 








17 


76 


Cecil 


47 


45 


35 












U 


53 


17 


Charles 


228 


226 


197 


37 


36 


20 


41 




118 


16 


140 


Dorchester 


39 


142 


123 




30 


24 




79 






74 




46 


105 


88 




12 


5 




11 






103 


Garrett 


























li6 


110 


103 




20 






26 


16 


48 


34 


Howard 


94 


87 


65 




66 












118 


Kent 


84 


84 


30 




48 


30 








27 




Montgomery 


222 


224 


147 




59 


27 






75 


50 


80 


Prince George's 

Queen Anne's 


514 


519 


403 


10 


260 


29 




9 


68 


147 


257 


85 


67 


74 


25 


20 


4 








66 






126 


99 


93 




17 


33 




24 




14 


22 




149 


145 


112 




82 


17 




53 


19 






Talbot 


122 


108 


58 




65 


17 


47 








35 




37 


33 






57 










6 


27 




165 


159 


37 




152 


52 




54 






79 




162 


140 


91 




51 


12 








38 


81 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. 

t Includes pupils taking shorthand, typing, bookkeeping, and business training. Also see TABLE 37. 



106 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 42 — White Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages: Maryland Countv 
High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1946 to 1955 



Year Ending 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 
















Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1946 


1,721 


2,629 


915 


1,738 


446 


743 


1947 


1,412 


2,227 


903 


1,652 


526 


712 


1948 


1,282 


2,042 


832 


1,541 


455 


623 


1949 


1,364 


2,086 


786 


1,295 


559 


745 


1950 


1,684 


2,436 


937 


1,356 


720 


854 


1951 


1,575 


2,369 


968 


1,492 


792 


949 


1952 


1,563 


2,437 


1,008 


1,468 


927 


1,001 


1953 


1,727 


2,476 


1,117 


1,521 


1,071 


999 


1954 


1,919 


2,694 


1,411 


1,991 


1,238 


1,216 


1955 


2,057 


2,816 


1,658 


2,218 


1,349 


1,381 



TABLE 43 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in the Foreign Languages : Maryland County 
High Schools : by Year, 1948-55, and by County, Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


Latin 


French 


Spanish 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1947-48 


23 


29 


22 


59 


1 


20 


1948-49 


16 


18 


45 


103 


4 


36 


1949-50 


22 


28 


90 


106 


13 


32 


1950-51 


28 


49 


63 


136 


25 


68 


1951-52 


30 


43 


78 


137 


31 


90 


1952-53 


33 


40 


130 


186 


25 


88 


1953-54 


46 


81 


196 


292 


21 


111 


1954-55 


39 


54 


156 


304 


44 


151 






BY COUNTY, 1954- 


55 






Anne Arundel . . 


6 


15 


34 


53 


19 


90 


Baltimore 






23 


56 






Calvert 






5 


11 






Charles 






17 


54 






Dorchester .... 






24 


24 






Howard 






14 


10 






Kent 






13 


22 






Montgomery. . . 






8 


26 






Prince George's 














Queen Anne's. . 






11 


24 






Talbot 






2 


16 






Washington . . . 






5 


8 






Wicomico 


24 


28 












9 


11 











* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. Figures in- 
clude duplicates, if there are any. 

For 1955 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIX. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



107 



TABLE 44— White Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics: Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1946 to 1955 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1946 


12,964 


1,134 


1,779 


14,093 


2,664 


1947 


14,090 


1,227 


2,110 


14,833 


2,261 


1948 


15,414 


1,119 


2.629 


16,165 


1,596 


1949 


17,744 


982 


2,822 


16,707 


2,300 


1950 


21,619 


1,488 


3,199 


18,989 


2,532 


1951 


24,739 


1,538 


4,174 


20,667 


2,566 


1952 


25.988 


1,499 


3,480 


23,399 


2,032 


1953 


28.479 


1,332 


2,965 


24,963 


1,829 


1954 


30,736 


1,503 


2,988 


27,472 


1,254 


1955 


33,455 


1,529 


2,805 


29,482 


2,025 



TABLE 45 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Industrial Work, Agriculture, and Home 
Economics : Maryland County High Schools : by Year, 1948-55, and by County, 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


Industrial 


Agriculture 


Home Economics 


Arts 


Education 


General 


Vocational 


1948 


1,533 


221 


1,084 


2,277 


1,068 


1949 


1,599 


282 


1,247 


2,533 


1,275 


1950 


2,099 


204 


1,083 


2,929 


1,023 


1951 


2,815 


341 


1,265 


3,333 


1,168 


1952 


3,567 


269 


1,023 


3,538 


1,130 


1953 


3,635 


390 


990 


3,927 


999 


1954 


3,871 


512 


981 


4,463 


725 


1955 


4,354 


505 


1,042 


4,323 


952 


BY COUNTY, 1954-55 


Allegany 


26 


23 




21 


17 


Anne Arundel .... 


288 


167 


60 


431 


188 




519 


44 




447 


27 


Calvert 


75 




53 


187 


73 




92 




53 


69 


41 


Carroll 


92 






64 


37 


Cecil 


96 






63 


29 


Charles 


316 




166 


166 


57 


Dorchester 


169 




68 


130 


61 


Frederick 


164 






102 


45 


Garrett 












Harford 


245 






205 






130 




84 


129 


36 


Kent 


133 




28 


110 


31 


Montgomery 


267 


171 


16 


269 


31 


Prince George's. . . 


639 


100 


139 


769 


110 


Queen Anne's .... 


122 




70 


113 


38 


St. Mary's 


56 




99 


87 


62 


Somerset 


216 






204 




Talbot 


166 




46 


155 


38 


Washington 


S3 






73 




Wicomico 


247 




65 


333 




Worcester 


213 




95 


196 


3i 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. Includes 
duplicates, if any. 

For 1955 enrollment in individual schools see TABLE XXIX. 



108 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 46— White Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: Years Ending June 30, 1946 to 1955 



Year Ending 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


June 30 
















Boys 


Girls 


Eoys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1946 


15,304 


18,981 


7,104 


7,564 


20,211 


21,212 




16,777 


20,114 


8,745 


8,623 


22,517 


22,585 


1948 


19,624 


22,866 


10,058 


10,058 


24,631 


24,414 


1949 


21,929 


24,141 


10,471 


10,435 


27,211 


26,769 


1950 


23,800 


26,374 


11,940 


11,513 


30,049 


29,236 


1951 


26,806 


29,276 


12,889 


12,853 


34,094 


32,955 


1952 


28,275 


30,650 


15,339 


15,253 


35,768 


34,101 


1953 


29,325 


31,470 


16,769 


16,327 


38,375 


35,954 


1954 


30,811 


32,788 


18,548 


17,574 


40,727 


37,927 


1955 


32,667 


34,359 


21,362 


20,275 


45,254 


41,423 



TABLE 47 — Colored Pupils Enrolled* in Music, Art, and Physical Education: 
Maryland County High Schools: by Year, 1948-55, and by County, Year 
Ending June 30, 1955 



Year and 
County 


Music 


Art 


Physical Education 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


Boys 


Girls 


1948 


3,017 


3,584 


823 


777 


3,154 


3,503 


1949 


3,322 


3,844 


1,217 


1,054 


3,717 


4,354 


1950 


3,552 


4,051 


1,301 


1,166 


4,147 


4,504 


1951 


4,624 


5,133 


1,601 


1,712 


5,046 


5,656 


1952 


4,951 


5,421 


1,656 


1,732 


5,409 


6,004 


1953 


5,063 


5,310 


1,742 


1,716 


5,710 


6,271 


1954 


5,313 


5,470 


2,094 


1,842 


6,095 


6,270 


1955 


5,696 


5,655 


2,005 


1,812 


6,411 


6,653 


BY COUNTY, 1954-55 




42 


41 






8 


11 


Anne Arundel . . 


691 


740 


460 


246 


657 


810 


Baltimore 


754 


710 


509 


472 


774 


743 


Calvert 


199 


216 


120 




217 


223 


Caroline 


174 


176 


30 


43 


179 


175 


Carroll 


99 


112 


7 


11 


99 


112 


Cecil 


37 


45 






100 


101 


Charles 


309 


333 


57 


134 


365 


385 


Dorchester .... 


156 


139 






266 


240 


Frederick 


160 


169 


22 


24 


191 


201 


Garrett 














Harford 


286 


245 


25 


36 


286 


245 


Howard 


177 


165 






221 


198 


Kent 


147 


142 






162 


150 


Montgomery. . . 


187 


168 


92 


134 


266 


399 


Prince George's 


756 


796 


608 


637 


910 


1,039 


Queen Anne's. . 


187 


180 






187 


180 


St. Mary's 


215 


213 


22 


27 


228 


224 




237 


200 






335 


293 


Talbot 


174 


211 






180 


238 


Washington . . . 


82 


74 


53 


48 


82 


68 


Wicomico 


305 


308 






372 


342 


Worcester 


322 


272 






326 


276 



* Excludes withdrawals for removal, transfer, death, or commitment to an institution. Includes 
duplicates, if any. 

For 1955 enrollment in individual high schools see TABLE XXIX. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



109 



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Commer- 
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Law 


O 


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Personal 

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Typing 


O 


t-OHO)«f (CKS1H 

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111 



TABLE 50 — Enrollment in Driver Education and Training : Maryland County High 
Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 


County 


Enrollment in Driver 
Education and Training 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 




Total 


Boys 


Girls 



WHITE ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Allegany. . . . 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Dorchester . . 
Garrett 



5,456 


2,309 


3,147 


Harford 


339 


157 


182 


Howard 


166 


63 


103 


406 


184 


222 


Kent 


87 


46 


41 


396 


182 


214 


Montgomery 


503 


203 


300 


836 


333 


503 


Prince George's 


954 


404 


550 


104 


55 


49 




209 


99 


110 


90 


39 


51 


Talbot 


102 


39 


63 


173 


49 


124 


Washington 


330 


111 


219 


118 


54 


64 


Wicomico 


332 


164 


168 


133 


42 


91 


Worcester 


178 


85 


93 



COLORED ENROLLMENT 



Total 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Harford 



666 


332 


334 


Howard 


95 


55 


40 








Kent 


43 


22 


21 


26 


15 


11 


Montgomery 


26 


2 


24 


64 


39 


25 


Prince George's 


158 


76 


82 


26 


13 


13 


Talbot 


39 


17 


22 


27 


14 


13 


Wicomico 


112 


56 


56 


25 


13 


12 


Worcester 


25 


10 


15 



112 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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113 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



117 



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118 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 57 — Number of Students in Maryland Colleges Who Prepared to Qualify for Standa 
Teaching Certificates in Maryland: 1952-1955 





1952* 


1953* 


1954* 


1955* 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colore 




679 


171 




681 


150 


607 


169 


588 


269 


Mttrqi?ry Qnwctcw a vrr* 

1\ Ul>Oll«X\ I O k_/ ll W 1j AJNU 




















38 




44 




35 




34 




IT T rMFVTARV 


















120 Semester hours 


224 


73 


253 


86 


236 


88 


219 


108 


Junior High (Core) 


73 




78 




78 


10 


74 


11 


High School 


















Total High School 


344 


98 


306 


64 


258 


71 


261 


150 


Agriculture 


10 


5 


12 


1 


7 


5 


5 


6 


Art 


21 




21 




19 


2 


21 






9 


3 


9 


3 


7 


7 


11 


19 


English 


57 


15 


42 


6 


37 


9 


32 


15 


Foreign Language (any) 
Health 


16 


2 


13 


1 


13 


5 


8 


6 














1 




Home Economics 


19 


9 


23 


8 


17 


4 


18 


7 


Industrial Arts 


27 


2 


28 


4 


19 




14 


2 


Library Science 


















Mathematics 


14 


9 


i3 


5 


ii 


3 


17 


6 




30 


9 


34 


7 


37 


5 


33 


12 


Physical Education: 


















Men 


40 


13 


31 


6 


24 


15 


23 


15 


Women 


14 


5 


11 


3 


11 


2 


15 


7 


Science: 


















All Sciences 


21 
















General Science 


2 




ii 


*2 


io 


2 


9 


7 


Biology 


5 




4 






1 


5 


1 


Chemistry 


2 




1 










2 


Physics 


1 




3 














56 


24 


50 


is 


46 


11 


49 


45 



* Calendar year. 

Note: Each student is counted only once (in his first major). 



Maryland State Department of Education 



119 



TABLE 58 



County Teachers in Service October, 1954, Who Attended Summer Schools and 
Evening Classes: Spring and Summer 1954 





Teachers in Service Oct. 1954 Who 
Attended School in 1954 




Number of Teachers 


County 


Total 


Number 


Per Cent 


School Attended 








Num- 
ber 


Elem. 


High 


Elem. 


High 




Total | Elem. 


High 



WHITE COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total White 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 
Baltimore .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester .... 



2,160 


1,269 


891 


22 


2 


19 


9 


62 


24 


38 


g 


I 


12 


2 


138 


97 


41 


19 




12 




413 


269 


144 


23 


4 


17 


9 


16 


9 


7 


25 


7 


21 


9 


26 


14 


12 


22 


2 


18 


2 


52 


26 


26 


15 


5 


15 


7 


48 


25 


23 


15 


8 


18 


7 


29 


14 


15 


20 


6 


22 


7 


11 


4 


7 


5 


4 


9 


6 


50 


26 


24 


13 


5 


12 


4 


60 


37 


23 


38 


9 


28 


7 


45 


30 


15 


12 


4 


8 


6 


40 


14 


26 


15 


9 


27 


4 


17 


7 


10 


15 


9 


21 


3 


641 


381 


260 


39 





39 


6 


269 


160 


109 


18 


8 


17 


7 


27 


14 


13 


28 





25 


5 


8 


5 


3 


7 


2 


7 





15 


9 


6 


17 





12 


5 


13 


7 


6 


13 





11 


8 


130 


71 


59 


23 


1 


20 


1 


27 


14 


13 


11 


8 


13 


4 


23 


12 


11 


18 


7 


16 


9 



Total 

University of Maryland 

Towson S. T. College 

George Washington University 
Johns Hopkins University .... 

Shepherd S. T. College 

Western Maryland College. . . 

Columbia University 

University of Delaware 

West Virginia University 

American University 

Pennsylvania State College. . . 

Catholic University 

Loyola College 

Fairmont Teachers College. . . 

Wilson Teachers College 

University of Colorado 

Temple University 

University of Pittsburgh 

S. T. College, California, Penn. 

Syracuse University 

Boston University 

Bucknell University 

University of Maine 

George Peabody College 

University of Virginia 

New York University 

One Hundred Thirty Others . . 



o 1 fin 


1 9fiQ 


WQ1 


897 






1 

LIU 


1 Q7 

lot 


g 


142 


83 


59 


118 


84 


34 


77 


66 


11 


74 


37 


37 


60 


28 


32 


52 


38 


14 


52 


14 


38 


42 


19 


23 


38 


13 


25 


34 


5 


29 


24 


8 


16 


22 


18 


4 


17 


17 




15 


2 


13 


12 


5 


7 


11 


4 


7 


10 


6 


4 


10 


3 


7 


9 


4 


5 


9 




9 


9 


3 


6 


8 


3 


5 


8 


4 


4 


7 




7 


260 


140 


120 



COLORED COUNTY TEACHERS 



Total Colored 


388 


183 


205 


22 


6 


30 


1 


Allegany 


1 




1 






16 


7 


Anne Arundel . . . 


43 


26 


17 


25 


7 


23 


6 


Baltimore 


48 


20 


28 


24 


4 


39 


4 


Calvert 


17 


6 


11 


16 


7 


44 





Caroline 


12 


4 


8 


23 


5 


44 


4 


Carroll 


6 


2 


4 


25 





33 


3 


Cecil 


2 


1 


1 


11 


1 


9 


1 


Charles 


20 


11 


9 


18 


3 


19 


1 


Dorchester 


16 


8 


8 


24 


2 


32 





Frederick 


11 


5 


6 


25 





35 


3 


Garrett 
















Harford 


16 


' 8 


' 8 


40 


6 


29 


6 


Howard 


6 


2 


4 


10 





20 





Kent 


5 


3 


2 


18 


7 


11 


1 


Montgomery .... 


43 


28 


15 


50 





28 


8 


Prince George's. . 


34 


15 


19 


11 


3 


17 


6 


Queen Anne's . . . 


13 


5 


8 


26 


3 


44 


4 


St. Mary's 


16 


6 


10 


25 





45 


5 


Somerset 


23 


9 


14 


28 


1 


46 




Talbot 


16 


8 


8 


30 


8 


33 


3 


Washington 


6 


2 


4 


33 


3 


44 


4 


Wicomico 


18 


9 


9 


21 


9 


30 





Worcester 


16 


5 


11 


11 


4 


57 


9 



Total 

New York University 

Morgan State College 

Columbia University 

Temple University 

Catholic University 

Howard University 

Johns Hopkins University 

American LTniversity 

Pennsylvania State College 

University of Maryland , 

Virginia State College 

University of Pennsylvania 

Boston University 

Syracuse University 

University of Pittsburgh 

Tuskegee Institute 

Loyola College 

University of Delaware 

University of Southern California 

Cornell University 

Hampton Institute 

Ohio State University 

Thirty-Five Others 



88 


183 


205 


90 


50 


40 


52 


45 


7 


33 


13 


20 


30 


18 


12 


19 


10 


9 


13 


3 


10 


13 


3 


10 


12 


3 


9 


11 


1 


10 


10 


7 


3 


9 


2 


7 


8 


3 


5 


5 


1 


4 


5 


2 


3 


5 


3 


2 


4 


2 


2 


3 




3 


3 


3 




3 


1 


' i 


2 




2 


2 


' i 


1 


2 




2 


54 


12 


42 



120 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 59 — Number of Certificates Issued to Maryland Teachers, Principals, 
Administrative and Supervisory Personnel in the County Schools by the 
Maryland State Department of Education: 1952-53, 1953-54, 1954-55 





Number of Certificates Issued 


Grade of Certificate 










1952-53 


1953-54 


1954-55 


Total Number of Certificates Issued 


2,882 


3,112 


3,679 


Administration and Supervision 








A.dministration and Supervision 


3 


2 


2 


High School Supervision 


4 


2 


6 


Elementary Supervision 


3 


10 


4 


Supervisor of Pupil Personnel I 


2 




2 




1 






Supervisor of Special Subjects 


4 


6 




Supervisor or Director in Special Areas 


8 


8 


15 


Visiting Teacher 


6 


11 


1 




5 


6 


11 


High School 










12 


4 


16 




370 


364 


452 




252 


239 


333 




54 


70 


40 


Junior High School 


101 


78 


90 


Nonpublic 


49 


47 


51 


Permits — Foreign Exchange Teachers 




1 




Elementary 








Principal 


24 


46 


48 




577 


552 


648 


Bachelor of Science in Special Subjects 


43 


44 


52 


Bachelor of Science for Kindergarten Teaching 


28 


49 


58 


Advanced First Grade 


5 


15 


5 


Nonpublic Bachelor of Science 


25 


18 


28 


Emergency Certificates 








Degree 






479 


High School Teaching 


322 


325 




592 


691 


740 


N on degree 


14 


31 


23 


High School Teaching 




276 


377 


460 




39 


59 


44 


Substitute Teachers' Certificates 










31 


25 


39 




32 


32 


32 



Maryland State Department of Education 



121 



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130 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 69 

Number and Per Cent of New Teachers: Maryland County Schools: 1946-1955 





New to Counties 




Number New to County Who Were 








Increase 
in 

Number 
of 






















Experienced 


Year 


Number 


Per Cent. 


Teaching 
Positions 

October 
to 

October 


In- 
experi- 
enced 


Sub- 
stitutes 

and 
Unknown 
* 


But 
New 

to 
State 


In 

Counties 
But Not 
Teaching 
Preced- 
ing Year 


From 
An- 
other 
Countyt 



WHITE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1945-46 


621 


22.7 


—52 


159 


85 


219 


157 


a50 


1946-47 


712 


25.3 


79 


145 


106 


279 


181 


a50 


1947-48 


586 


19.6 


181 


127 


57 


244 


154 


d59 


1948-49 


646 


20.5 


148 


151 


26 


309 


157 


c59 


1949-50 


692 


20.3 


264 


264 


21 


267 


136 


d43 


1950-51 


831 


22.7 


250 


350 


15 


303 


157 


f58 


1951-52 


1,068 


25.8 


478 


447 


10 


399 


206 


f95 


1952-53 


1,148 


25.1 


437 


509 


2 


463 


163 


gioo 


1953-54 


1,491 


29.3 


522 


614 


32 


549 


283 


h95 


1954-55 


1,574 


27.6 


612 


643 


23 


692 


198 


jll6 



WHITE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 



1945-46 


779 


3-7.0 


286 


240 


51 


302 


186 


50 


1946-47 


763 


33.4 


193 


298 


53 


278 


131 


c57 


1947-48 


675 


26.7 


239 


259 


22 


280 


112 


b38 


1948-49 


605 


22.4 


168 


281 


25 


239 


58 


b57 


1949-50 


722 


24.6 


242 


431 


7 


207 


76 


a52 


1950-51 


912 


27.4 


394 


603 


17 


223 


68 


a53 


1951-52 


943 


26.0 


289 


545 


1 


312 


79 


fl04 


1952-53 


907 


23.7 


200 


513 


3 


295 


91 


el04 


1953-54 


980 


24.0 


260 


508 


10 


322 


137 


c98 


1954-55 


1,196 


26.7 


399 


562 


15 


447 


157 


il23 


COLORED ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS 


1945-46 


108 


18.2 


—10 


48 


13 


20 


27 


18 


1946-47 


104 


17.0 


18 


45 


8 


19 


32 


6 


1947-48 


71 


11.7 


—5 


50 


3 


8 


10 


6 


1948-49 


97 


15.1 


35 


53 


4 


12 


27 


a9 


1949-50 


71 


10.9 


11 


38 




11 


22 


4 


1950-51 


76 


11.5 


8 


39 


5 


14 


18 


6 


1951-52 


94 


13.6 


32 


52 


3 


18 


21 


11 


1952-53 


84 


11.5 


27 


53 




20 


10 


all 


1953-54 


103 


13.4 


46 


56 




18 


29 


9 


1954-55 


103 


12.7 


40 


64 


i 


12 


26 


5 


COLORED HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS 


1945-46 


96 


37.0 


43 


59 


7 


15 


14 


al2 


1946-47 


104 


35.3 


35 


64 


1 


23 


16 


3 


1947-48 


110 


32.3 


46 


65 


2 


29 


14 


4 


1948-49 


98 


26.0 


36 


56 


2 


26 


14 


5 


1949-50 


102 


24.2 


44 


68 




24 


9 


6 


1950-51 


153 


29.8 


93 


93 




42 


18 


10 


1951-52 


139 


24.5 


53 


91 




37 


11 


11 


1952-53 


111 


18.5 


33 


72 


i 


30 


7 


all 


1953-54 


138 


21.4 


46 


69 


2 


46 


20 


alO 


1954-55 


138 


20.3 


35 


61 




44 


30 


bl4 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Excluded from total number and per cent new to counties. 

Transfers from Baltimore City are included in the total number and per cent as follows: a-1; b-2; 
c-3; d-4; e-5; f-6; g-11; h-13; i-15; j-18. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



131 



TABLE 70 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland 

During the School Year 1954-55 



County 


New to County 


Increase in Number of 
Teaching Positions 
October to October 


Number New to County Who Were 


XT 

Num- 
ber 


rer 

Cent 


TTri 

un- 
known* 


Inexperienced 


Experienced 


From 

Mary- 
land 

lanuj 


From 
Other 
States"|" 


cut i\ 
State 
ocnc 

From 
Mary- 
land 


ew to 
Public 
)oIsJ 

From 
Other 
States 


Former County 
Teachers But Not 
Teaching in Coun- 
ties in 1953-54 


From 

Baltimore City 


From 

Another County 


Total State 


3,586 


21.6 


1,354 


40 


958 


751 


487 


832 


518 


35 


279 


Baltimore City 


666 


13.5 


268 




283 


96 


17 


107 


107 




56 


Total Counties 


3,011 


25.8 


1,086 


40 


D / O 


DOO 






411 


35 


223 




72 


11.6 


15 




27 


4 


3 


8 


21 


1 


8 




oil 


Q1 O 


122 


o 


58 


99 


36 


63 


33 


6 


14 




570 


27.1 


228 




180 


104 


56 


93 


71 


14 


52 


Calvert 


29 


22.7 


10 




9 


5 


2 


3 


8 




2 


Caroline 


35 


21.3 


2 


i 


8 


6 


3 


9 


8 






Carroll 


96 


27.2 


15 


3 


30 


14 


8 


11 


17 


3 


10 


Cecil 


104 


34.5 


33 


1 


6 


29 


23 


27 


15 




3 




57 


23.7 


11 




13 


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8 


18 


11 




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Dorchester 


19 


9.3 


2 


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5 


5 




2 


3 




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Frederick 


105 


24.9 


27 


2 


34 


9 


16 


15 


20 


' 2 


7 




35 


20.0 


—1 




5 


14 


3 


7 


4 




2 


Harford 


174 


37.6 


61 


3 


33 


50 


17 


50 


14 


' 2 


5 




62 


27.8 


16 




11 


6 


10 


15 


11 


1 


8 


Kent 


26 


20.8 


6 


' i 


6 


5 


2 


8 


3 




1 


Montgomery 


580 


33.3 


255 


6 


89 


90 


116 


198 


30 


3 


48 


Prince George's. . . . 


552 


32.3 


177 


8 


74 


143 


119 


116 


66 


3 


23 


Queen Anne's 


28 


20.3 


10 




8 


5 


1 


5 


4 




5 


St. Mary's 


67 


42.4 


17 


" 2 


17 


14 


11 


11 


9 




3 


Somerset 


30 


18.4 


2 




7 


7 


4 


4 


5 




3 


Talbot 


37 


23.9 


3 




3 


6 


8 


13 


5 




2 


Washington 


107 


17.4 


32 


9 


28 


15 


8 


18 


20 




9 


Wicomico 


79 


27.5 


33 




17 


13 


9 


15 


18 




7 


Worcester 


59 


30.7 


10 


i 


7 


8 


7 


16 


15 




5 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t At each level teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those 
teachers at the same level about whom such information was available, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

° Transfers from one county to another are excluded from the total and percentage for counties as a group, but 
transfers from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from 
total and percentage for total State. 



132 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 71 



Number and Per Cent of Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 



County 


New to 
County 


Increase in Number of 
Teaching Positions 
October to October 


Number New to County Who Were 




Per 
Cent 


Un- 


Inexperienced 


Experienced 


From Marylandf 


From Other Statesf 


But Is 
State 
Schc 

TS 

c 

08 

£b 

O C3 


ew to 
Public 
>ols 

■ 

B 

<A 
W 

E g 
o-g 

£o 


Former County 
Teachers But Not 
Teaching in Coun- 
ties in 1953-54 


From 

Baltimore City 


From 

Another County 


Total State 


2 ,037 


21.8 


782 


24 


595 


355 


300 


485 


278 




18 


121 


Baltimore City 


396 


14.1 


130 




206 


37 


16 


65 


54 






18 


Total Counties 


1 ,677 


25.7 


652 


24 


389 


318 


284 


420 


224 




18 


103 


Allegany 


32 


10 . 6 


-2 




15 




1 


1 


12 




1 


2 


Anne Arundel 


192 


32.3 


81 




42 


61 


23 


41 


15 




1 


9 


Baltimore 


329 


26.7 


155 




105 


54 


33 


64 


44 




8 


21 


Calvert. . 


14 


19.7 


5 




7 


3 






3 






1 


Caroline 


12 


15.0 


3 




5 




' 2 


"i 


4 








Carroll 


35 


19.9 


14 




13 


4 


4 


3 


8 






2 


Cecil 


57 


34.1 


29 




3 


12 


16 


14 


9 






3 


Charles 


26 


20.3 


4 




9 


1 


5 


4 


6 






1 


Dorchester 


5 


4.7 


2 




1 






1 


2 








Frederick 


49 


23.1 


24 


' 2 


18 


* 3 


' *7 


8 


8 




' i 


2 


Garrett 


9 


9.5 


-4 




5 




1 


1 


2 








Harford 


97 


37.0 


37 


' 2 


21 


23 


9 


29 


7 




' 2 


' 4 


Howard 


22 


20.4 


5 




3 




4 


7 


3 




1 


4 


Kent 


10 


16.7 





' i 


2 




1 


3 


1 






1 


Montgomery 


369 


35.7 


146 


6 


53 


54 


71 


139 


21 




' i 


24 


Prince George's. . . . 


343 


34.9 


98 


5 


45 


80 


82 


77 


38 




2 


14 


Queen Anne's 


11 


15.9 


6 




6 


2 




1 


1 








St. Mary's 


35 


37.6 


9 


' 2 


10 


7 


' i 


3 


6 








Somerset 


12 


14.1 


2 




3 


1 


3 




3 






' 2 


Talbot 


13 


16.3 







1 


1 


4 


' 4 


3 










50 


15.9 


19 


5 


12 


4 


4 


9 


11 






5 




37 


23.1 


1 




6 


6 


4 


6 


11 






4 


Worcester 


21 


19.4 


18 


"i 


4 


1 


3 


4 


6 






2 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available. 
X Includes transfers from private schools. 

° Transfers from one county to another are excluded from the total and percentage for counties as a group, but 
transfers from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total 
and percentage for total State. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



133 



TABLE 72 



Number and Per Cent of White Elementary Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual 
County of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 





New to 
County 




Number New to County Who Were 




































Inexperienced 




Experienced 




County 






mber c 
ions 






atest 


But New to 
State Public 
Schools! 


Former County 
Teachers But Not 
Teaching in Coun- 
ties in 1953-54 








Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Increase in Nu 
Teaching Posit 
October to Oct 


Un- 
known* 


From Marylan 


j From Other St 


From 
Maryland 


From 

Other States 


From 

Baltimore City 


From 

Another Count; 


Total State 
























Baltimore City 
























Total Counties 


1 574 
31 


27.6 


612 


23 


342 


301 


278 


414 


198 


18 


98 


Allegany 


10.5 






15 




1 




12 


1 

8 


2 


Anne Arundel 

Baltimore 


174 
324 


35.3 
28.2 


74 
151 




30 
104 


58 
52 


22 
33 


40 
63 


15 
43 


8 
21 
1 


Calvert 


9 


25.7 


4 




5 






2 




CflroIinG 


11 


17.5 


3 




4 




' i 




4 




Carroll 


33 


19.6 


15 




11 


4 


4 


3 


8 


1 


2 


Cecil 


57 


36.1 


29 




3 


12 


16 


14 


9 




3 


Charles 


14 


20.6 


-1 




3 




5 


4 






1 
1 


Dorchester 


4 


5.4 


2 




1 






1 


1 




Frederick 


49 


25.5 


24 


' 2 


18 


3 


' 7 


8 


8 


i 


2 


Garrett 


9 


9.5 


-4 




5 




1 


1 


2 




Harford 


96 


39.7 


37 


' i 


21 


23 


8 


29 


7 


' 2 


'i' 


Howard 


20 


22.7 


4 




2 




4 


6 


3 


1 


4 


Kent 


7 


15.9 


1 


i 


1 




1 


3 




1 


Montgomery 


365 


37.4 


144 


6 


53 


52 


70 


139 


21 




23 


Prince George's. . . . 
Queen Anne's 


320 
6 


37.7 
12.0 


90 
4 


4 


37 
1 


78 
2 


80 


77 
1 


28 
1 


2 


14 


St. Mary's 


31 


44.9 


9 


' 2 


8 


7 


' "l 


3 


4 






Somerset 


7 


13.2 






1 




2 




2 




• ' 2 


Talbot 


10 


18.5 






1 




4 


' 2 


2 






Washington 


50 


16.2 


19 


5 


12 


4 


4 


9 


11 




5 


Wicomico 


29 


24.4 


1 




6 


3 


4 


6 


8 




2 


Worcester 


16 


25.0 


7 


i 




1 


3 


4 


6 





























* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available. 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but trans- 
fers from Baltimore City to a county are included in all totals and percentages. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



134 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 73 



Number and Per Cent of Colored Elementary School Teachers New to the Schools of Each 
Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 



County 


New to 
County 


Increase in Number of 
Teaching Positions 
October to October 


Number New to County Who Were 


Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Un- 
known* 


Inexperienced 


Experienced 


Form Marylandt 


From Other Statesf 


But f> 
State 
Sch( 

T) 
C 

0) 

c">> 
ca 

£S 


ew to 
Public 
>ols 

W 

o.c 


Former County 
Teachers But Not 
Teaching in Coun- 
ties in 1953-54 


From 

Baltimore City 


From 

Another County 


Total State 
























Baltimore City 
























Total Counties 


103 


12.7 


40 


1 


47 


17 


6 


6 


26 




5 


Allegany 


1 


20.0 


-1 




12 














Anne Arundel 


18 


17.8 


7 




3 


i 


1 






i 


Baltimore 


5 


6.1 


4 




1 


2 




1 










5 


13.9 


1 




2 


2 






1 






Caroline 


1 


5.9 






1 














Carroll 


2 


25.0 


-1 




2 














Cecil 
























Charles 


12 


20.6 


"5 




' 6 


i 






' 5 






Dorchester 


1 


3.0 














1 






Frederick 
























Garrett 
























Harford 


i 


5.6 




















Howard 


2 


10.0 


' i 




' i 














Kent 


3 


18.7 


-1 




1 


1 






i 






Montgomery 


4 


7.1 


2 






2 


"i 








i 


Prince George's. . . . 


23 


17.3 


8 


1 


8 


2 


2 




10 






Queen Anne's 


5 


26.3 


2 




5 














St. Mary's 


4 


16.7 






2 








' '2 






Somerset 


5 


15.6 


2 




2 




i 




1 






Talbot 


3 


11.5 














1 






Washington 
























Wicomico 


' .8 


19^5 














3 




' 2 


Worcester 


5 


11.4 


ii 


... 


' '4 












1 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available. 

Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



135 



TABLE 74 

Number and Per Cent of High School Teachers New to the Schools of Each Individual County 
of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 





New to 
County 




Number New to County Who Were 




































Inexperienced 




Experienced 




County 






mber o 
ions 




-t— 


i 

a 


But New to 
State Public 
SchoolsJ 


Former County 
Teachers But Not 
Teaching in Coun- 
ties in 1953-54 




o 

>> 




Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Increase in Nu 
Teaching Posit 
October to Oct 


Un- 
known* 


From Marylan 


From Other St 


From 
Maryland 


From 

Other States 


From 

Baltimore City 


From 

Another Count 



Total State 


1 ,549 


21. 


2 


572 


16 


363 


396 


204 


347 


223 


17 


158 




270 


12 


6 


138 




77 


59 


18 


42 


36 




38 


Total Counties 


1 ,334 


25. 


8 


434 


16 


286 


337 


186 


305 


187 


17 


120 


Allegany 


40 


12. 


6 


17 




12 


4 


2 


7 


9 




6 


Anne Arundel 


119 


29. 


5 


41 


' 2 


16 


38 


13 


22 


18 


' 5 


5 


Baltimore 


241 


27. 


5 


73 




75 


50 


23 


29 


27 


6 


31 


Calvert 


15 


26 


3 


5 




2 


2 


2 


3 


5 




1 




23 


27 


4 


-1 


"i 


3 


6 


1 


8 


4 






Carroll 


61 


34 


5 


1 


3 


17 


10 


4 


8 


9 


2 


8 


Cecil 


47 


35 


1 


4 


1 


3 


17 


7 


13 


6 






Charles 


31 


27 


4 


7 




4 


3 


3 


14 


5 




' 2 


Dorchester 


14 


14 


3 





' i 


4 


5 




1 


1 




2 


Frederick 


56 


26 


7 


3 


16 


6 


' 9 


7 


12 


i 


5 


Garrett 


26 


32 


5 


3 






14 


2 


6 


2 




2 


Harford 


77 


38 


3 


24 


"i 


12 


27 


8 


21 


7 




1 


Howard 


40 


34 


8 


11 




8 


6 


6 


8 


8 




4 


Kent 


16 


24 


6 


6 




4 


4 


1 


5 


2 






Montgomery 


211 


29 


8 


109 




36 


36 


45 


59 


9 


' 2 


24 


Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


209 


28 


9 


79 


3 


29 


63 


37 


39 


28 


1 


9 


17 


24 


6 


4 




2 


3 


1 


4 


3 




4 


St. Mary's 


32 


49 


2 


8 




7 


7 


4 


8 


3 




3 


Somerset 


18 


23 


1 







4 


6 


1 


4 


2 






Talbot 


24 


32 





3 




2 


5 


4 


9 


2 




2 


Washington 


57 


18 


9 


13 


4 


16 


11 


4 


9 


9 




4 


Wicomico 


42 


33 


1 


32 




11 


7 


5 


9 


7 




3 


Worcester 


38 


45 


2 


-8 




3 


7 


4 


12 


9 




3 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
f Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available, 
t Includes transfers from private schools. 

° Transfers from one county to another are excluded from the total and percentage for counties as a group, but trans- 
fers from Baltimore City to a county are included in totals and percentages. All transfers are excluded from total 
and percentage for total State. 



136 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 75 

Number and Per Cent of White Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers New 
to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 



County 



New to 
County 



Num- 
ber 



Per 
Cent 



IN 

Z cC 
o 

sis 

m 
hi 



Number New to County Who Were 



Un- 
known* 



Inexperienced 



Experienced 



But New to 
State Public 
Schoolst 





no 




0> 


T3 


rt 


C 






E 


o ca 









° s 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1 ,196 

40 
103 
231 
11 
18 

57 
44 
24 
9 
48 

26 
71 
35 
12 
200 

188 
12 
25 
10 
20 

56 
36 
28 



26.7 

12.8 
31.1 
28.7 
34.4 
27.3 

34.5 
35.8 
36.4 
12.3 
24.9 

32.5 
40.8 
36.8 
25.5 
30.5 

30.5 
23.5 
58.1 
20.8 
39.2 

19.1 
37.1 
43.1 



399 

16 

35 
76 
3 



-1 

3 
4 

-2 
2 

3 
22 
10 

5 

103 

68 
3 
5 
1 



15 



255 

12 
14 

73 
2 



307 

4 

33 
50 
2 
4 

10 
16 

3 
2 
5 

14 

26 
5 
3 

34 

57 
3 
7 
3 

5 



168 

2 
9 
21 
1 
1 

4 

7 



279 

7 
22 
28 
2 
5 

7 
12 
10 
1 
7 

6 
21 
7 
3 
58 

35 
3 



157 



* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available. 

% Includes transfers from private schools. 

° Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City to a county are included in all totals and percentages. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



137 



TABLE 76 

Number and Per Cent of Colored Junior, Junior-Senior, and Senior High School Teachers 
New to the Schools of Each Individual County of Maryland During the School Year 1954-55 





New to 
County 




Number New to County Who Were 












Inexperienced 


Experienced 


County 






mber o 
ions 




-t— 


atesf 


But New to 
State Public 
Schools! 


)rmer County 
jachers But Not 
caching in Coun- 
ts in 1953-54 







Num- 
ber 


Per 
Cent 


Z oO 

O 

lis 

£ 8 w 


Un- 
known* 


•om Marylan 


om Other St 


om 

aryland 


•om 

her States 


•om 

iltimore City 


om 

lother Count 














h 












Total State 
























Baltimore City 
























Total rmintific 


138 


20 .3 


35 


1 


31 


30 


18 


26 


30 


2 


12 


A 1 Ipo^h nv 


0.0 


1 










AnnG Arundel 
Baltimore 


16 
10 


22.2 
14.1 


6 
-3 


' i 


' 2 
2 


' '5 


' "a 

2 


' i 


* 3 
3 


i 


' i 


Calvert 


4 


16.0 


2 








1 


1 


2 






Caroline 


5 


.27.8 


-1 






" 2 




3 








Carroll 


4 


33.3 


2 




1 






1 


1 




i 


Cecil 


3 


27.3 


1 






i 




1 


1 




Charles 


7 


14.9 


3 










4 






i 


Dorchester 


5 


20.0 


2 






3 






"l 




i 

3 


Frederick 


8 


47.1 


1 




"i 


1 


' 2 






i 


Garrett 




















Harford 


' 6 


22^2 


' 2 






i 


' 3 




" 2 






Howard 


5 


25.0 


1 




' 2 


i 




' i 


1 






Kent 


4 


22.2 


1 




1 


i 




2 








Montgomery 


11 


21.1 


6 




5 


2 


' i 


1 


' 1 




' i 


Prince George's .... 
Queen Anne's 


21 

5 


19.4 
27.8 


11 




1 
1 


6 


4 
1 


4 
1 


5 
2 




l 


St. Mary's 


7 


31.8 


3 




4 






2 




' i 


Somerset 


8 


26.7 


-1 




2 


' 3 




i 


1 




l 


Talbot 


4 


16.7 


3 




1 






2 


1 




Washington 


1 


11.1 






1 












Wicomico 


6 


20.0 


3 




3 


1 




' 2 








Worcester. . 


10 


52.6 


-9 




3 


2 




1 


' 4 

























* Teachers are classified as "unknown" when their former teaching experience has not been established, 
t Teachers whose residence could not be determined for this study were prorated according to those teachers about 
whom such information was available. 
+ Includes transfers from private schools. 

Transfers from one county to another are excluded from total and percentage for counties as a group, but transfers 
from Baltimore City are included in all totals and percentages. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



138 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 77 



Number and Per Cent of Teachers and Pupils in One-Teacher* Elementary Schools : 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


Schools for White Pupils 


Schools for Colored Pupils 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Teachers in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Pupils in One- 
Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Total Counties 


14 


0.2 


313 


2 


16 


2.0 


440 


1.8 


Allegany 










1 


18.9 


33 


22.2 


Anne Arundel 


















Baltimore 


















Calvert 










i 


2.8 


26 


2^3 


Caroline 


















Carroll 


















Cecil 




































Dorchester 


5 


6.7 


72 


3.4 


5 


i5!i 


147 


12.5 












3 


14.6 


93 


13.5 


Garrett 


5 


5.1 


124 


4.5 










Harford 


















Howard 


















Kent 










2 


11.8 


54 


10^7 






































Queen Anne's 


















St. Mary's 


i 


1.4 


43 


2.2 


i 


4^0 


35 


4.3 




2 


3.7 


49 


3.4 










Talbot 


1 


1.8 


25 


1.6 


2 


s'.i 


37 


4^8 




















Wicomico 










i 


2.4 


15 


1.2 


Worcester 



















* Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



139 



TABLE 78 

Decrease in Teachers Employed in Maryland County One-Teacher Schools*: 

1923-1955 



County Elementary School Teachers 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Total 


In One-Teacher Schools 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


3,063 


1,093 


35.7 


712 


403 


56.6 


1928 


3,071 


827 


26.9 


734 


379 


51.7 


1933 


2,948 


406 


13.8 


718 


334 


46.5 


1938 


2,951 


287 


9.7 


677 


271 


40.0 


1943 


2,677 


143 


5.3 


593 


132 


22.3 


1946 


2,719 


88 


3.2 


597 


98 


16.4 


1947 


2,806 


83 


2.9 


608 


91 


15.0 


1948 


2,979 


77 


2.6 


612 


84 


13.7 


1949 


3,170 


73 


2.3 


647 


82 


12.7 


1950 


3,432 


64 


1.9 


655 


63 


9.6 


1951 


3,696 


54 


1.5 


663 


49 


7.4 


1952 


4,164 


40 


1.0 


696 


35 


5.0 


1953 


4,670 


33 


0.7 


731 


26 


3.5 


1954 


5,219 


25 


0.5 


765 


25 


3.3 


1955 


5,856 


14 


0.2 


805 


16 


2.0 



Schools having a one-teacher organization of grades one to five or more. 



140 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 79 



Number and Per Cent of Men Teachers in Maryland Counties : 1923-1955 



Year Ending 
June 30 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1923 


287 


9.4 


253 


36.9 


122 


17.1 


13 


49.8 


1928 


204 


6.6 


333 


34.3 


68 


9.3 


25 


47.9 


1933 


219 


7.4 


430 


36.3 


76 


10.5 


46 


49.1 


1938 


261 


8.9 


522 


38.7 


79 


11.7 


68 


50.6 


1943 


139 


5.2 


538 


29.7 


58 


9.7 


81 


42.0 


1946 


107 


3.9 


629 


29.4 


45 


7.5 


88 


33.7 


1947 


125 


4.5 


787 


33.8 


52 


8.6 


103 


34.4 


1948 


161 


5.4 


931 


36.7 


62 


10.1 


126 


37.2 


1949 


175 


5.5 


1,025 


38.3 


68 


10.5 


140 


37.3 


1950 


243 


7.1 


1,203 


41.1 


70 


10.6 


154 


36.6 


1951 


295 


8.0 


1,454 


44.0 


73 


11.0 


205 


40.0 


1952 


380 


9.1 


1,654 


45.9 


77 


11.1 


212 


38.1 


1953 


460 


9.9 


1,822 


47.5 


83 


11.4 


239 


39.7 


1954 


495 


9.5 


1,956 


47.8 


82 


10.7 


268 


41.3 


1955 


624 


10.7 


2,203 


48.9 


92 


11.5 


279 


40.7 



Note: For basic data see TABLE X. 



Maryland State Department of Education 141 



TABLE 80 — Number of Public Schools : Number of Teachers and Principals : State of 
Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Number 








"53 




























CO 
















of 


Schools 


u 






























b 


B 










c 






Teachers 

AND 

Principals 


Itimore 


Allegany 


ne Arun 


Itimore 


Ivert 


roline 


rroll 


"3 


arles 


rchester 


iderick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


e 


>ntgome 


nee Geo 


een Anr 


Mary's 


■nerset 


lbot 


ishingto 


comico 


>rcester 




< 


a 

m 


c 
< 


CIS 
- 


cS 

O 


cS 

O 


CS 

U 


o 

u 


X, 

O 


o 
Q 


ft 


« 




o 
X 


M 




t- 
Ph 


3 




o 

«3 


73 









ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . . 


792 


134 


29 


55 


63 


14 


13 


19 


21 


16 


26 


35 


23 


18 


13 


14 


75 


83 


11 


18 


19 


17 


38 


23 


15 


1.0- 19 ... . 


44 




1 






1 


1 


2 


1 




10 


3 


6 






3 








3 


2 


7 


1 


*3 




2.0- 2.9 


95 


3 


1 


6 


"a 


3 


1 




6 


2 


3 


8 


8 




■3 


5 


3 


10 


1 


6 


8 




6 


3 


5 


3.0- 3.9 ... . 


51 


3 


1 


5 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


2 


4 


2 


1 


1 




1 


5 


4 


3 




1 


i 


4 


5 




4.0- 4.9 ... . 


53 


2 


2 


8 


3 


2 


1 




2 




2 


8 


3 


1 




1 


2 


4 






1 


1 


5 


2 


3 


5.0- 5.9 ... . 


34 


2 


1 


2 




2 


3 


1 




2 


1 


2 


1 




1 


1 




4 


'2 


2 


1 


3 


3 






6.0- 6.9 


41 


5 


2 


1 


2 


1 


1 


2 


i 


4 


2 






1 


1 




'4 


3 




3 


2 


1 


4 


1 




7.0- 7.9 . . . 


24 


1 


1 


1 


3 




1 


2 


1 


1 




1 




1 


1 




3 


5 


'2 














8.0- 8.9 ... . 


32 


1 


6 


4 








4 


1 






1 


i 


1 


1 


i 


5 












2 


1 


2 


9.0- 9.9 


30 




2 


1 


1 






1 




1 




3 


1 


2 


1 


1 


4 


6 


1 


1 


1 


1 




1 




10.0-10.9 .... 


23 


1 


2 


1 


3 






2 












1 


1 




2 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


11.0-11.9 ... 


32 


6 




4 


5 




i 






2 




1 




1 


1 




1 


6 






1 






1 


2 


12.0-12.9 .... 


27 


7 




1 


1 




l 




1 










1 


1 




4 


3 






1 


i 


2 


2 




13.0-13.9 .... 


31 


9 


2 


1 


2 










1 








2 






4 


4 








1 


2 






14.0-14.9 .... 


23 


2 


3 


2 


2 






1 


2 






'2 










4 


1 










2 






15.0-15.9 


24 


3 


1 


2 








1 


2 






1 




2 






4 


4 










1 






16 .0-16 .9 . . . 


23 


4 


1 


3 


2 






1 








2 












3 










2 






17.0-17.9 .... 


13 


3 




2 


1 














1 










3 


1 










2 






18.0-18.9 .... 


18 


5 


1 


2 


1 








i 
















2 


4 
















19.0-19.9 .... 


21 


4 




2 


3 








1 
















8 


3 
















20.0-20.9 


15 


7 




1 


1 








1 
















3 


2 
















21.0-21.9 


23 


6 




2 


3 
























4 


4 
















22.0-22.9 .... 


11 


2 




1 


1 
























4 


2 










i 






23.0-23.9 .... 


5 


3 






























1 












1 






24.0-24.9 .... 


7 


2 


i 


i 


























1 


i 
















25.0-25.9 .... 


13 


5 




1 


3 
























3 


1 
















26.0-26.9 .... 


8 


6 






2 










































27.0-27.9 .... 


5 


3 






1 


























i 
















28.0-28.9 .... 


6 


4 






2 










































29.0-29.9 


4 


2 






2 










































30.0-30.9 .... 


11 


6 






3 










1 
















i 
















31.0-31.9 .... 


5 


2 






1 


























1 
















32.0-32.9 


5 


2 






2 


























1 
















33.0-33.9 .... 




2 


i 














































34.0-34.9 .... 


5 


4 




i 












































35 . and over . 


27 


17 






i 


















2 




















1 





JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . . 


221 


38 


10 


9 


17 


3 


6 


13 


9 


7 


5 


9 


2 


7 


6 


4 


17 


19 


4 


5 


7 


3 


11 


6 


4 


1.0- 2.9 ... . 


4 














3 


























1 










3.0- 4.9 ... . 


4 
















1 


2 








1 
























5.0- 6.9 ... . 


9 


1 


1 








1 


1 




1 
















1 






1 




1 


1 




7.0- 8.9 ... . 


7 












1 










1 
















'2 


1 






2 




9.0-10.9 


9 




1 










1 


2 




1 


1 






1 


1 














i 






11.0-12.9 


15 


3 


2 




1 






2 


2 










1 




1 




1 


1 




1 










13.0-14.9 


6 


2 






1 






1 














i 










i 












15.0-16.9 


15 


2 












1 






1 


2 




1 






2 




1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


17.0-18.9 


13 


1 










3 


1 


1 










1 


'2 


i 


1 




1 












1 


19.0-20.9 


6 






1 








2 














1 












2 










21.0-22.9 


9 








1 










1 




2 












1 




1 






2 






23.0-24.9 


16 


3 


1 












2 


1 


i 


1 










1 


2 


■i 






i 


2 






25.0-29.9 


14 


2 


1 






2 








2 


2 






1 






1 


2 














1 


30.0-34.9 


16 


1 


1 






1 






1 






1 






i 




1 


3 










3 


2 


1 


35.0-39.9 


14 


3 






2 
















i 


1 






3 


1 








1 








40.0-44.9 .... 


12 


1 


i 


2 


2 
























3 


1 










1 


1 




45.0-49.9 .... 


8 


1 




2 


2 






1 










1 










1 
















50.0-54.9 .... 


7 


2 




















1 










2 


2 
















55.0-59.9 .... 


4 


1 




1 


1 


























1 
















60 . 0-64 .9 


7 




1 




1 


















1 






1 


2 










1 






65.0-69.9 


2 








2 










































70.0-74.9 


5 




1 


1 


2 










































75.0-79.9 .... 


2 


1 
































1 
















80.0-84.9 


2 








1 
























1 


















85.0-89.9 .... 


2 


1 






























1 


















90.0-94.9 .... 


5 


5 
















































95.0-99.9 .... 


4 


3 






1 










































100 and over. . 


4 


4 

















































* Includes one school having a graded organization. 



142 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 81 — Number of Public Schools: Average Number Belonging: State of Maryland: 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 







>> 
































jn 

~Q> 


01 


















o 




-0 


























b 


be 
<- 








S 






Average 
Number 
Belonging 


Schools 


Itimore 


>> 
c 

OS 


ne A run 


Itimore 


lvert 


roline 


rroll 


'C 


arles 


rchester 


rederick 


rrett 


rford 


ward 


s 


>ntgome 


nee Geo 


een Ann 


Mary's 


jmerset 


lbot 


ishingto 


comico 


>rcester 






a 


— 


c 




n 




a 











S3 

























< 


PQ 


< 


< 


n 


O 


O 


O 


O 


O 


P 


h 





PS 




« 


2 


Ph 




w 


w 




f 







ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


*792 


1 

134 


29 


55 


63 


14 


13 


19 


21 


16 


26 


35 


23 


18 


13 


14 


75 


83 


11 


18 


19 


17 


38 


23 


15 


30 or less . . 


30 


1 








1 


1 


2 






6 


1 


4 






3 


1 


1 






2 


4 


1 


2 




31- 60 . . . 


75 


4 


1 


5 


1 


2 






'4 




6 


7 


10 




i 


2 


3 


5 


i 


*7 


6 


3 


3 


2 


2 


61- 90 . . . 


63 


2 


2 


2 


4 


2 


'2 


i 


3 


'4 


4 


4 






2 


4 


2 


6 


3 


2 


2 




5 


4 


3 


91- 120 . . . 


44 


2 


2 


6 


1 


1 


2 




1 




2 


1 


3 


'2 






2 


2 




1 


2 


i 


6 


4 


3 


121- 150 . . . 


50 


2 


1 


7 


3 


2 


1 


i 


1 


2 


2 


4 


1 




i 


i 


2 


6 


'2 


1 


1 


5 


3 


1 




151- 180 .. . 


31 




1 


1 




2 


2 


1 


2 


2 




5 


1 




1 


1 


2 


2 




2 


2 




3 


1 




181- 210 . . 


28 


4 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


3 


1 


3 


i 


1 




i 






1 


4 


i 














211- 240 . . . 


32 


1 


3 


4 


1 


1 


1 




1 




1 






1 


2 




4 


4 


1 


1 






3 


2 


1 


241- 270 .. . 


33 


5 


3 




4 






1 


1 






'2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


6 


2 


1 






i 






1 


271- 300 .. . 


33 




3 


4 


3 






4 




i 


i 


1 




1 


1 


1 


3 


5 




i 


2 




i 


1 




301- 330 . . . 


20 


i 


1 


2 


2 


i 


i 


1 


















1 


5 


1 










1 


2 


331- 360 .. . 


28 


2 




1 


2 




1 


1 




2 








3 


2 




2 


5 




1 




2 


1 


1 


1 


361- 390 .. . 


21 


7 




1 


1 






1 












1 






3 


3 


i 




i 


1 


1 






391- 420 .. . 


29 




'4 


2 


2 


i 




1 


1 


1 


1 






1 






3 


4 










3 


i 


i 


421- 450 .. . 


24 


5 






3 








1 






i 


1 


1 


i 




3 


5 










2 






451- 480 .. . 


28 


6 


"3 


2 


1 




1 




2 






2 




2 






5 






1 






2 




i 


481- 510 .. . 


16 


1 




3 


2 






i 






i 


1 










1 


4 










1 






511- 540 .. . 


15 


3 




3 
















2 






1 




3 


3 
















541- 570 .. . 


18 


3 


i 


3 


1 








1 




1 


1 










3 


3 










1 






571- 600 .. . 


16 


6 




2 


3 








2 
















1 


1 












i 




601- 660 .. . 


28 


6 


i 


1 


5 


















1 






7 


6 
















661- 720 .. . 


19 


8 






2 
























5 


2 












1 




721- 780 .. . 


21 


6 




2 


























7 












2 


1 




781- 840 .. . 


14 


4 


1 




5 
























3 


1 
















841- 900 .. . 


7 


5 






1 










1 
































901- 960 .. . 


14 


9 






1 
























2 


2 
















961-1020 . . . 


13 


7 






2 






1 












1 








2 
















1021-1080 . . . 


9 


5 




1 


3 










































1081-1140 . . . 


6 


6 
















































1141 1200 . . . 


6 


6 
















































1201 and over 


21 


15 






5 


















1 

























JUNIOR, JUNIOR-SENIOR, SENIOR, AND VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOLS 



All Schools . . 


*221 


38 


10 


9 


17 


3 


6 


13 


9 


7 


5 


9 


2 


7 


6 


4 


17 


19 


4 


5 


7 


3 


11 


6 


4 


50 or less . . 


5 


1 












3 


























1 










51- 100 . . . 


9 












1 


1 


2 


3 






















1 






1 




101- 150 .. . 


9 


2 


i 






i 


1 






















1 






1 




i 


1 




151- 200 .. . 


18 


1 


1 




i 






1 


3 




1 


2 








2 




1 




2 


1 




1 


1 




201- 250 .. . 


12 


1 


2 




1 






3 












1 


2 




1 


















251- 300 .. . 


8 












2 




















1 










1 






1 


301- 350 . . . 


15 


3 










1 




1 










1 


2 




1 




1 


2 


i 








1 


351- 400 . . . 


13 


1 




1 






1 


4 






1 


1 




1 


1 




1 








1 










401- 450 .. . 


9 


1 






i 










i 




1 












1 


1 




1 




2 






451- 500 . . . 


12 


1 


i 












1 


1 


1 


1 








1 




2 




i 




i 


1 






501- 600 .. . 


15 


2 








2 






1 




2 


1 




1 






1 


2 










1 




i 


601- 700 .. . 


12 


1 


1 














1 










1 




1 


3 










1 


i 


1 


701- 800 . . . 


13 


1 


1 


1 


1 








1 
















3 










1 


2 


1 




801 900 . . . 


12 


3 




1 


2 


















1 






4 


1 
















901 1000 . . . 


7 




i 


1 


2 














1 












1 










1 






1001-1100 . . . 


8 


3 




2 


1 
















1 


























1101-1200 . . . 


6 






1 


1 
























1 


2 












1 




1201-1300 . . . 


1 


































1 
















1301-1400 . . . 


4 


1 




1 
















1 












1 
















1401-1500 . . . 


6 




i 




1 


















1 






1 


2 
















1501 1600 . . . 


1 












































1 






1601 1700 . . . 


1 


1 
















































1701 1800 . . . 


6 


2 






2 
























2 


















1801 1900 . . . 


5 


1 


i 


1 


2 










































1901 2000 . . . 


2 


1 
































1 
















2001 2100 . . . 


2 


2 
















































2101 2200 . . . 


2 


2 
















































2201 2300 . . . 


1 








1 










































2301 2400 . . . 


\ 


















































2501 and over 


6 


5 






1 











































* A total of four seventh grades which arc housed in elementary school buildings but offer a junior high school 
curriculum (two each in Allegany and Baltimore) are included in the number of elementary schools and excluded 
from the number of high schools. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



143 



TABLE 82 



Supervisory* and Pupil Personnel Services Provided by the Counties and Baltimore 
City in Maryland Public Schools: Number of Principals and Teachers: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 









General Supervisors by 













Type of School 








Number of 














Principals 


Total 






Other 


Pupil 


County 


and 


Super- 


Elementary 


High 


Super- 


Personnel 




Teachers 


visors 






visors - !" 




Total State 


16,821.0 


270.9 


97.9 


64.5 


108.5 


117 4 


Baltimore City 


4,965 .0 


95 


26.5 


17.5 


51 .0 


54.0 


Total Counties 


11,856.0 


175.9 


71.4 


47.0 


57.5 


63.4 




615.5 


9.7 


3.0 


2.0 


4.7 


4.0 


Anne Arundel 


997.1 


13.5 


5.5 


2.5 


5.5 


4.0 


Baltimore 


2,096.4 


30.6 


8.0 


9.1 


13.5 


13.0 


Calvert 


128.7 


3.0 


2.0 


1.0 




1.0 


Caroline 


164.0 


2.4 


1.4 


1.0 




1.0 


Carroll 


350 . 


5.4 


2.2 


2.0 


1.2 


2.0 


Cecil 


308.4 


4.8 


2.0 


2.0 


0.8 


1.0 


Charles 


238.1 


4.0 


2.0 


2.0 




2.0 


Dorchester 


205.0 


3.0 


2.0 


1.0 




1.0 


Frederick 


421.5 


6.0 


2.2 


2.3 


1.5 


2.0 


Garrett 


178.0 


3.0 


2.0 


1.0 




1.0 


Harford 


459.8 


4.9 


2.4 


2.5 




2.5 


Howard 


219.0 


3.0 


1.3 


1.2 


0.5 


1.0 


Kent 


121.4 


2.5 


1.5 


1.0 




1.0 


Montgomery 


1,891.0 


26.8 


10.3 


5.0 


ii!-6 


8.9 


Prince George's 


1,740.8 


24.5 


8.0 


4.0 


12.5 


8.0 


Queen Anne's 


136.5 


2.5 


1.5 


1.0 




1.0 


St. Marv's 


161.0 


3 3 


2.0 


1.0 


0.3 


1.0 




162.0 


3.0 


1.6 


1.4 




1.0 


Talbot 


157.0 


2.5 


1.5 


1.0 




10 


Washington 


624.4 


9.5 


3.0 


1.0 


5.5 


3.0 


Wicomico 


287.4 


4.0 


3.0 


1.0 




2.0 


Worcester 


193.0 


4.0 


3.0 


1.0 




1.0 



* Excludes supervisors of Maintenance, Transportation, and Buildings. 

t Includes supervisors of Art, Audio- Visual Education, Commercial, Curriculum, Distributive Education, 
English, Geography, Guidance, Handwriting, Health, History, Home Economics, Industrial Education, 
Instruction, Languages, Libraries, Mathematics, Music, Physical Education, Radio and Television, 
Reading, Safety Education, School Lunch, Science, Special Education, Testing, and Vocational Education. 



144 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CHART 1 

Total School^Current Expenses and Total State Aid : Counties of Maryland and 

Baltimore City: 1928-1955 



SO 



60 








n 
u 
a 

Pi 

o 

Q 

. ):0 








Millions oi 

1 1 






/ / 
/ 

/ 9 / 
/ / 

y / 
/ / 


— 


Current Expenses - 
Baltimore City 

^Current Expenses - Covin 

State Aid - Counties^, 
State 


✓ / 

ties S 
lid - Baltimore J-.fcy^.''' 


y 


1? 


28 19 


38 19 


U8 19 



Year 



Maryland State Department of Education 



145 



TABLE 83 

Disbursements for Current Expenses, Debt Service, and Capital Outlay: 
Maryland Public Schools: 1923-1955 





Current Expenses by Source of Funds 


Debt 


Capital 


School Year 


Total 


State 


Federal 


Local 


Service 


Outlay 



total state 



$12,764,250 
16,147,689 
18,293,874 
20,467,797 
23,546,628 
28,121,601 
31,068,741 
36,621,996 
51,175,927 
57,567,186 
64,661,563 
71,448,847 
80,931,643 
91,844,287 
100,833,162 
113,657,913 



$3,058,180 
3,207,088 
4,616,690 
6,196,636 
6,960,882 
8,982,115 
10,803,700 
11,594,496 
21,534,379 
22,993,313 
24,640,596 
27,659,372 
30,241,963 
32,458,006 
35,859,919 
39,123,482 



$46,966 
69,150 
80,139 
209,722 
245,787 
520,720 
434,104 
1,234,736 
1,547,581 
1,235,487 
2,011,407 
2,080,125 
2,380,208 
2,457,252 
2,632,578 
4,005,882 



$9,659,104 
12,871,451 
13,597,045 
14,061,439 
16,339,959 
18,618,766 
19,830,937 
23,792,764 
28,093,967 
33,338,386 
38,009,560 
41,709,350 
48,309,472 
56,929,029 
62,340,665 
70,528,549 



$789,311 
2,131,699 
3,142,211 
3,739,854 
3,776,207 
4,063,754 
4,192,979 
3,878,466 
4,506,683 
4,893,175 
6,800,278 
6,133,501 
7,751,625 
9,850,293 
12,023,860 
14,217,276 



BALTIMORE CITY 



$6,799,794 
8,360,391 
9,312,282 
10,103,224 
10,620,120 
12,357,985 
13,048,637 
14,455,866 
20,500,455 
22,625,966 
25,684,535 
27,113,114 
28,683,507 
33,011,067 
34,297,839 
36,776,856 



$1,052,845 
999,753 
1,568,928 
1,463,505 
1,495,480 
1,981,734 
2,176,054 
2,243,349 
4,779,040 
5,016,904 
5,422,725 
6,016,080 
6,060,360 
6,404,596 
7,371,737 
7,269,993 



$13,256 
17,240 
11,131 
61,200 
64,355 
75,627 
77,328 
175,615 
656,839 
277,450 
717,106 
668,895 
506,334 
339,035 
220,604 
231,814 



$5,733,693 
7,343,398 
7,732,223 
8,578,519 
9,060,285 
10,300,624 
10,795,255 
12,036,902 
15,064,576 
17,331,612 
19,544,704 
20,428,139 
22,116,813 
26,267,436 
26,705,498 
29,275,049 



$685,620 
1,580,599 
1,983,157 
2,335,256 
2,105,427 
2,210,496 
2,349,885 
1,958,255 
2,307,374 
1,628,980 
1,647,487 
1,622,453 
1,754,563 
1,810,740 
2,557,570 
2,734,400 



TOTAL COUNTIES 



$5,964,456 
7,787,298 
8,981,592 
10,364,573 
12,926,508 
15,763,616 
18,020,104 
22,166,130 
30,675,472 
34,941,220 
38,977,028 
44,335,733 
52,248,136 
58,833,220 
66,535,323 
76,881,057 



$2,005,335 
2,207,335 
3,047,762 
4,733,131 
5,465,402 
7,000,381 
8,627,646 
9,351,147 
16,755,339 
17,976,409 
19,217,871 
21,643,292 
24,181,603 
26,053,410 
28,488,182 
31,853,489 



$33,710 
51,910 
69,008 
148,522 
181,432 
445,093 
356,776 
1,059,121 
890,742 
958,037 
1,294,301 
1,411,230 
1,873,874 
2,118,217 
2,411,974 
3,774,068 



$3,925,411 
5,528,053 
5,864,822 
5,482,920 
7,279,674 
8,318,142 
9,035,682 
11,755,862 
13,029,391 
16,006,774 
18,464,856 
21,281,211 
26,192,659 
30,661,593 
35,635,167 
41,253,500 



$103,691 
551,100 
1,159,054 
1,404,598 
1,670,780 
1,853,258 
1,843,094 
1,920,211 
2,199,309 
3,264,195 
5,152,791 
4,511,048 
5,997,062 
8,039,553 
9.466,290 
11,482,876 



N. B. — This table has been revised to include all funds available in each year. 



146 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CHART 2 

Per Cent of Current Expenditures: Maryland Public Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County- 



Total State 
Baltimore City- 
Total Counties 

Charles 

Garrett 

St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Howard 

Harford 

Queen Anne's 

Cecil 

Kent 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 

Carroll 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Talbot 

Frederick 

Wicomico 

Washington 

Prince George's 

Montgomery 

Baltimore 



Received 
from 



^S&zIgiSfe ^Federal A: 



□ Equalization 



I Fund 
25 



50 



County Levy and 
Other County Funds 

100 






Maryland State Department of Education 



147 



TABLE 84 

Source of Current Expenses*: Maryland Public Schools: Year Ending June 30, 1955 













Per 


Cent from Each 


Source 














State 










Local 




_ 

1 otal 






T 1 T 

.Local Levy 


















County 


Current 


State 


Federal 


and Other 
















ana 




Funds 






Local Sources 


Equal- 










Fed- 


Other 












ization 


Other 


Total 


eral 


Local 












Fund 














Sour- 


























ces 


Total State 


$113,657,912.88 


$39,123,481.63 


$4,005,882.40 


$70,528,548.85 


11.7 


22 


7 


OA 


4 

i 






5 


62 . 1 


oaico. *^ity 


+9£ 77£ Q^K 7S 


+7 9fiQ QQ9 7 r . 


ooi Qi a 00 


+9Q 97^ OJ.Q A3 




19 


8 


19 


8 





6 


79 6 


Total 


























Counties 


176,881,057.10 


$31,853,488.88 


3,774,068.40 


41,253,499.82 


17.4 


OA 





41 


A 
4 


A 


Q 

y 


53 .7 


All 

Allegany . . 




1 Q41 409 1 fi 


1 9fi Ofifi fi4 


1 fiOO nc iQ 80 


31 .4 


21 




52 


9 


3 


4 


43 . 7 


An. Arundel 


c coc OAA no 


9 7^7 R8 


oou,uoi.iy 


9 ^Q8 747 

£,0.70, 1 4 * .DO 


26 8 


21 


7 


48 


5 


5 


8 


45.7 


Baltimore 


1 °. R41 1 1 8 80 


9 QQt; Qt;9 so 


07c con cn 
£ / 0,OoU.OU 


1 Q70 934 49 




17 


6 


17 


6 


2 





80.4 


\y3,ivt*rz .... 


7ar» 1 av 9a 


^9fi 740 Q1 


09 fiOfi f)9 


oon 81 3^ 


45 5 


22 





67 


5 


4 


2 


28 .3 


Caroline. . 


942,543.99 


623,879.63 


17,047.16 


301,617.20 


44.8 


21 


4 


66 


2 


1 


8 


32 . 




i qu fi^.8 48 

1, 0714,000.40 


1 004 fi49 01 


or acq 


874 fi^7 49 

1 t,DO * .4^ 


29 8 


22 


7 


52 


5 


1 


8 


4£ 7 
40 . / 


Cecil 


l f OD-,Ul D-D i 


OQQ QQ4 Cfi 


1 fi=; 79^ 7°. 

IOO, t CD. / 


78fi 8Q£. 98 


27 9 


20 


7 


48 


6 


8 


9 


42.5 


Charles. . . . 


1,430,935.68 


989,740.56 


194,029.53 


247,165.59 


45^4 


23 


8 


69 


2 


13 


5 


17.3 


Dorchester 


1 242 948 65 


634 498 46 


23 129.77 


585 320.42 


28 8 


22 


2 


51 





1 


9 


47.1 


Frederick. . 


2'438',746'.46 


1,072',248'.54 


124[437'.01 


1,242',060'.91 


21.9 


22 


1 


44 





5 


1 


50.9 


Garrett .... 


1,098,919.30 


870,744.82 


25,110.08 


203,064.40 


56.5 


22 


7 


79 


2 


2 


3 


18.5 


Harford . . 


2,797,624.72 


1,190,957.37 


457,597.16 


1,149,070.19 


23.1 


19 


5 


42 


6 


16 


3 


41.1 


Howard . . . 


1,273,520.04 


769,579.45 


47,620.19 


456,320.40 


38.3 


22 


1 


60 


4 


3 


7 


35.9 


Kent 


769,597.93 


433,864.84 


8,547.24 


327,185.85 


36.3 


20 


1 


56 


4 


1 


1 


42.5 


Montgom'y 


12,065,213.31 


2,118,735.54 


900,145.64 


9,046,332.13 


1.8 


15 


7 


17 


5 


7 


5 


75.0 


Pr. George's 


10,451.342.22 


3,893,487.47 


660,347.83 


5,897,506.92 


18.6 


18 


7 


37 


3 


6 


3 


56.4 


Qu. Anne's. 


848,876.17 


475,783.83 


20,821.67 


352,270.67 


35.4 


20 


6 


56 





2 


5 


41.5 


St. Mary's . 


1,001,450.29 


584,258.62 


175,377.19 


241,814.48 


35.2 


23 


1 


58 


3 


17 


5 


24.2 


Somerset . . 


895,860.82 


653,949.63 


7,827.98 


234,083.21 


47.8 


25 


2 


73 








9 


26.1 


Talbot 


918,432.41 


457,997.35 


12,964.99 


447,470.07 


27.9 


22 





49 


9 


1 


4 


48.7 


Washington 


3,805,692.10 


1,703,625.77 


82,399.45 


2,019,666.88 


25.0 


19 


8 


44 


8 


2 


2 


53.0 


Wicomico. . 


1,708,640.45 


778,209.40 


27,757.05 


902,674.00 


25.1 


20 


5 


45 


6 


1 


6 


52.8 


Worcester . 


1,176,741.21 


605,640.30 


23,529.33 


547,571.58 


29.2 


22 


3 


51 


5 


2 





46.5 



* Includes payments applicable to the preceding year received after June 30, 1954 and excludes those for the 
current year received after June 30, 1955. 

t Includes funds for teachers in the Employees' Retirement System as follows: 
State, $1,786,059.00; local, $847,981.00; total, $2,634,040.00. 

t Includes $4,430,285.70 for the Teachers' Retirement System and $40,925.30 for related expense fund not dis- 
tributed to the counties in these columns. 



148 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CHART 3 

Per Cent Distribution of Tax Dollar for School Current Expenses : 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



INCLUDING TRANSPORTATION 




Maryland State Department of Education 149 
TABLE 85 

Per Cent Distribution of School Expenditures by Maryland Local Boards of Education : 

Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 



Current Expenses 



Adminis- 
tration 





Salaries 




of 


Super- 


Teachers 


vision 


and 




Princi- 




pals 



Books, Ma- 
terials, and 
Other Costs 
of 

Instruction 



Opera- 
tion 



Mainte- 
nance 



Other 
School 
Services 



Fixed 
Charges 
and Pay- 
ments to 
Adjoining 

Units 



Capital* 
Outlay 



INCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties. . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



2.4 


1 


Q 


62 


6 


5 


6 


8 1 


4 


3 


g 


3 


t7 


I 


27.94 


2.8 


1 


7 


64 


g 


5 


g 


8.8 


3 


9 


4 


7 


t7 


4 


19.13 


2.2 


1 


5 


61 


5 


5 


5 


7.8 


4 


5 


10 










31.51 


2.0 


1 


6 


66 


2 


4 


4 


8.2 


3 


5 


12 


g 


1 


3 


28.02 


2 9 


1 


2 


67 


9 


5 


9 


7 9 


3 


5 


9 


o 


1 


7 


38 47 


2^1 


1 


8 


65 


1 


8 


2 


7^4 


6 


6 


7 


8 


1 





43.80 


2.9 


2 


3 


58 


1 


3 


5 


6.0 


6 


8 


19 


4 


1 





12.51 


2.3 


1 


7 


65 


8 


3 


8 


5.5 


3 


8 


16 


3 





8 


.33 


1.7 


1 


8 


68 


2 


4 


5 


6.3 


2 


9 


12 


8 


1 


8 


18.13 


1.9 


1 


7 


64 


3 


4 


7 


8.7 


5 


8 


11 


2 


1 


7 


34.78 


3.0 


1 


6 


60 


5 


6 


3 


9.5 


2 


2 


15 


3 


1 


6 


25.88 


2.0 


1 


4 


62 


7 


3 


5 


8.8 


3 




16 


3 


2 


2 


29.95 


1.8 




5 


67 





4 


3 


7.1 


3 


7 


13 


3 


1 


3 


20.25 


2.3 


1 


5 


58 


2 


2 


9 


5.4 


2 


7 


23 


5 


3 


5 


.91 


2.2 







63 


8 


5 


2 


8.1 


4 


1 


14 


5 


1 


1 


42.28 


1.9 


1 


8 


66 


6 


4 


8 


6.1 


3 


6 


14 


8 





4 


35.51 


3.7 


2 


1 


60 


8 


3 


7 


6.9 


6 


5 


15 


3 


1 





3.39 


2.7 




5 


66 


4 


6 


3 


9.4 


4 


7 


8 


5 





5 


27.10 


1.8 


1 


5 


66 


1 


6 


4 


10.8 


5 


2 


6 


7 


1 


5 


31.65 


2.3 


1 


8 


61 


5 


3 


8 


6.7 


4 


1 


18 


8 


1 





22.75 


2.9 


1 


9 


54 


5 


5 


2 


8.8 


6 


8 


19 








9 


22.75 


2.3 


2 





66 


4 


3 





6.1 


4 





15 





1 


2 


12.99 


2.8 


1 


7 


65 


5 


3 


9 


8.0 


3 


2 


13 


1 


1 


8 


8.31 


3.2 


1 


7 


66 


4 


4 


5 


6.8 


5 


2 


11 


1 


1 


1 


28.38 


2.5 


1 


4 


64 





5 


4 


7.0 


3 


7 


13 


9 


2 


.1 


51.95 


2.4 


2 





62 


4 


3 


9 


7.6 


3 


1 


16 


5 


2 


.2 


23.42 



EXCLUDING COST OF TRANSPORTATION 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . 

Total Counties. . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester. . . . 



2.5 




6 


65.9 


5 


9 


8 


5 


4.6 


3 


5 


t7 


5 




28.98 


2.8 


1 


7 


65.1 


5 


8 


8 


8 


3.9 


4 


4 


t7 


5 




19.18 


2.4 


1 


6 


66.3 


5 


9 


8 


4 


4.8 


3 


1 


t7 


5 




33.14 


2.1 


1 


8 


72.1 


4 


8 


9 





3.8 


5 





1 


4 




29.78 


3.1 


1 


2 


72.9 


6 


3 


8 


5 


3.8 


2 


3 


1 


9 




40.15 


2.3 




9 


69.2 


8 


7 


7 


8 


7.0 


2 


1 


1 







45.29 


3.5 


2 


7 


70.1 


4 


3 


7 


3 


8.2 


2 


7 


1 


2 




14.72 


2.6 


2 





76.5 


4 


4 


6 


4 


4.5 


2 


7 





9 




.39 


1.9 


2 





75.7 


5 





7 





3.2 


3 


3 


1 


9 




19.72 


2.2 


1 


9 


70.6 


5 




9 


5 


6.4 


2 


5 


1 


8 




36.94 


3.4 




8 


69.6 


7 


3 


11 





2.6 


2 


5 


1 


8 




28.68 


2.3 


1 


7 


72.8 


4 


1 


10 


2 


3.6 


2 


8 


2 


5 




33.19 


2.0 


1 


6 


74.6 


4 


8 


8 





4.1 


3 


5 


1 


4 




22.02 


3.0 


1 


9 


73.6 


3 


7 


6 


8 


3.4 


3 


2 


4 


4 




1.15 


2.5 


1 


1 


71.9 


5 


9 


9 


2 


4.4 


3 


8 


1 


2 




45.19 


2.2 


2 





76.1 


5 


5 


6 


9 


4.1 


2 


7 





5 




38.63 


4.3 


2 


4 


70.2 


4 


3 


7 


9 


7.6 


2 


1 


1 


2 




3.90 


2.8 


1 


6 


69.2 


6 


5 


9 


8 


4.9 


4 


6 





6 




27.91 


1.8 


1 


6 


68.6 


6 


7 


11 


3 


5.3 


3 


1 


1 


6 




32.49 


2.7 


2 


2 


72.9 


4 


4 


7 


9 


4.9 


3 


8 


1 


2 




25.87 


3.4 


2 


3 


65.3 


6 


3 


10 


6 


8.1 


2 


9 


1 


1 




26.08 


2.7 


2 


3 


76.6 


3 


5 


7 


1 


4.7 


1 


7 


1 


4 




14.71 


3.1 


1 


9 


73.7 


4 


4 


9 





3.6 


2 


3 


2 







9.24 


3.4 


1 


7 


70.8 


4 


8 


7 


3 


5.6 


5 


2 


1 


2 




29.70 


2.8 


1 


6 


71.9 


6 





7 


8 


4.2 


3 


3 


2 


4 




54.86 


2.9 


2 


3 


73.2 


4 


6 


8 


8 


3.6 


2 





2 


6 




26.41 



* Percentages obtained by dividing capital outlay by the sum of capital outlay and current expenses excluding debt 
service. 

t Appropriations of State and local funds for the retirement of teachers are included. Retirement for county teach- 
ers not distributed to the counties in this column. 



150 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 86 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging : Administration : State of Maryland 
1945, 1950, 1954, and 1955 



County 



Total State .... 

Baltimore City. 

Total Counties. 

Allegany .... 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline .... 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . 
Frederick . . . 



1945 



$2.67 

3.32 

2.27 

1.92 
2.53 
1.41 
3.88 
3.88 

2.35 
2.46 
2.45 
2.84 
1 94 



1950 



$5.93 

7.89 

4.94 

5.37 
4 32 
3.90 
7.48 
5.46 

5.16 
4.10 
4.05 
5.04 
3.47 



1954 



$5.23 

6.02 

4.86 

4 67 
5.73 
4.94 
6.24 
4.69 

3.11 
4.34 
5.23 
4.28 
3.63 



1955 



$6.03 
7.29 



4.64 
6 25 
5.07 
6.81 

5.43 

3.65 
4.61 
7.14 
4.52 
3.72 



County 



Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



1945 



$3 . 68 
2.02 
2.87 
4.07 
2.80 

1.41 

4.38 
4.53 
3.03 
3.64 

1 85 
3.10 

2 31 



1950 1954 1955 



$5.26 
4.86 
5.70 
8.44 
5.39 

4.65 
5.71 
6.47 
5.29 
4.67 

6.44 

4.87 
5.23 



See TABLES VI and XIV for basic data. 
Note: Beginning with 1954 costs are lower due to Pupil Personnel Services being shown under "Other 
School Services." 



TABLE 87 

Cost per Public School Pupil Belonging : Current Expenses : Counties of Maryland 

1923—1955 



Year 


All Schools 


Elementary Schools 


High Schools 


Totalf 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


Total 


White 


Colored 


1923 


$43 


00 


$46 


22 


$17 


07 


$34 


84 


$39 


84 


$17 


08 


$90 


79 


$91 


12 


$77 


38 


1928 


52 


62 


55 


85 


24 


25 


42 


91 


47 


81 


22 


97 


93 


51 


95 


82 


52 


13 


1933 


51 


89 


54 


37 


25 


95 


42 


51 


46 


82 


24 


12 


79 


32 


82 


35 


44 


34 


1938 


61 


12 


63 


20 


35 


15 


50 


70 


53 


41 


30 


10 


87 


59 


90 


87 


58 


54 


1943 


71 


16 


72 


48 


56 


54 


60 


39 


60 


70 


48 


34 


100 


46 


102 


57 


84 


23 


1946* 


98 


28 


98 


27 


76 


97 


80 


29 


83 


15 


67 


46 


124 


73 


127 


02 


107 


44 


1947 


114 


54 


114 


15 


91 


43 


92 


83 


95 


84 


76 


69 


145 


20 


147 


66 


134 


92 


1948 


157 


30 


153 


19 


122 


59 


124 


19 


128 


27 


105 


62 


194 


71 


198 


28 


169 


78 


1949 


172 


47 


163 


29 


133 


69 


133 


08 


136 


89 


115 


20 


' 207 


84 


211 


59 


182 


48 


1950 


176 


92 


166 


09 


140 


53 


137 


60 


140 


91 


121 


18 


J 208 


07 


211 


11 


187 


57 


1951 


186 


34 


170 


05 


156 


26 


141 


80 


143 


51 


132 


52 


214 


60 


215 


81 


206 


56 


1952 


206 


80 


193 


05 


178 


44 


162 


26 


164 


27 


150 


97 


240 


20 


241 


32 


232 


73 


1953 


216 


17 


201 


34 


190 


57 


172 


94 


174 


35 


164 


34 


1 246 


25 


247 


36 


239 


07 


1954 


226 


44 


207 


43 


207 


17 


181 


55 


182 


06 


178 


20 


! 252 


69 


251 


80 


258 


64 


1955 


242 


47 


222 


63 


223 


35 


200 


26 


200 


59 


198 


04 


1 260 


41 


259 


47 


266 


86 



t Administration, fixed charges and kindergartens are included in the total for all schools but are ex- 
cludfd elsewhere in this table. 

t Prior to 1946, pupils in gradp 7 or grades 7 and 8 of junior high schools were considered elementary 
and not high school pupils. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



151 



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ifENTARY 


Whii 


Cost 






$200.59 


193.26 
180.95 
202.44 
222.94 
196.26 


166.57 
186.70 
220.80 
205.04 
167.50 


214.25 
189.38 
192.74 
212.00 
236.67 


192.30 
213.66 
220.63 
201 .82 
211.65 


192.77 
181.02 
218.15 


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152 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 89 

Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 











Instructional Service 
















Total 


























County 


Current 






Salaries of 














Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








vision! 


and 










nance 


Services 












Teachers 


















Total State 


$202 


72 


$3 


59 


$142 


67 


$10 


91 


$19 


81 


$11 


43 


$14 


31 


Baltimore City 


208 


39 


4 


02 


155 


06 


11 


53 


21 


49 


11 


01 


5 


28 


Total Counties 


200 


26 


3 


40 


137 


30 


10 


64 


19 


08 


11 


61 


18 


23 


Allegany 


193 


43 


3 


04 


137 


56 


7 


86 


16 


71 


7 


07 


21 


19 


Anne Arundel .... 


179 


75 


2 


16 


131 


79 


9 


17 


15 


68 


7 


26 


13 


69 


Baltimore 


204 


36 


3 


07 


142 


86 


15 


16 


15 


99 


16 


83 


10 


45 


Calvert 


193 


40 


5 


39 


118 


49 


5 


41 


12 


71 


15 


21 


36 


19 


Caroline 


194 


05 


3 


83 


129 


89 


6 


35 


12 


76 


6 


65 


34 


57 


Carroll 


168 


03 


2 


61 


119 


54 


7 


09 


11 


58 


4 


76 


22 


45 


Cecil 


188 


01 


2 


49 


127 


95 


8 


50 


16 


47 


11 


43 


21 


17 




219 


63 


2 


91 


144 


67 


14 


12 


19 


96 


4 


71 


33 


26 


Dorchester 


181 


26 


3 


53 


120 


60 


5 


65 


15 


02 


6 


28 


30 


18 


Frederick 


166 


60 


2 


80 


115 


34 


7 


41 


14 


39 


6 


31 


20 


35 


Garrett 


214 


25 


4 


19 


139 


37 


4 


21 


12 


09 


6 


02 


48 


37 


Harford 


189 


93 


2 


00 


129 


39 


7 


17 


14 


93 


9 


41 


27 


03 


Howard 


191 


15 


3 


25 


130 


98 


7 


95 


13 


88 


6 


47 


28 


62 


Kent 


210 


24 


5 


43 


133 


85 


6 


90 


17 


13 


11 


69 


35 


24 


Montgomery 


242 


52 


4 


77 


157 


90 


13 


50 


32 


75 


16 


14 


17 


46 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


193 


27 


3 


44 


135 


51 


11 


76 


22 


36 


11 


81 


8 


39 


213 


61 


4 


76 


135 


51 


7 


07 


15 


09 


8 


85 


42 


33 


St. Mary's 


212 


14 


4 


32 


119 


28 


11 


12 


23 


74 


14 


03 


39 


65 


Somerset 


184 


62 


3 


66 


127 


72 


5 


19 


10 


67 


9 


.36 


28 


02 


Talbot 


198 


00 


3 


90 


136 


14 


5 


47 


16 


.54 


8 


.41 


27 


54 


Washington 


192 


.86 


3 


45 


136 


97 


7 


14 


16 


.46 


12 


.39 


16 


45 


Wicomico 


178 


59 


3 


65 


123 


87 


7 


86 


11 


.71 


7 


.82 


23 


.68 


Worcester 


194 


.85 


4 


60 


130 


45 


5 


75 


14 


.64 


6 


.50 


32 


.91 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXI. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



153 



TABLE 90 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 











Instructional Service 














Total 






















County 


Current 






Salaries of 












Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








vision! 


an 


d 








nance 


Services 












Teachers 














Total State 






















































$200 


59 


$3 


27 


$137 


96 


$10.94 


$19 


30 


$11 


89 


$17 . 23 


Allegany 


193 


26 


3 


00 


137 


30 


7.84 


16 


59 


7 


05 


21 48 


Anne Arundel .... 


180 


95 


2 


15 


132 


19 


9.58 


15 


99 


7 


68 


13.36 




202 


44 


2 


77 


141 


39 


15.17 


16 


01 


16 


86 


10.24 


Calvert 


222 


94 


5 


79 


131 


21 


6.29 


17 


47 


19 


17 


43.01 




196 


26 


3 


63 


131 


93 


6.58 


13 


45 


7 


58 


33.09 


Carroll 


166 


57 


2 


56 


119 


32 


6.95 


11 


58 


4 


71 


21.45 


Cecil 


186 


70 


2 


49 


127 


82 


8.60 


15 


91 


11 


79 


20.09 




220 


80 


2 


85 


144 


67 


15.08 


20 


90 


4 


93 


32.37 




205 


04 


2 


85 


137 


27 


6.13 


19 


39 


7 


23 


32.17 


Frederick 


167 


50 


2 


59 


115 


84 


7.59 


14 


55 


6 


44 


20.49 




214 


25 


4 


19 


139 


37 


4.21 


12 


09 


6 


02 


48.37 


Harford 


189 


38 


2 


04 


130 


04 


6.90 


14 


31 


9 


68 


26.41 




192 


74 


2 


49 


132 


67 


8.04 


14 


00 


7 


34 


28.20 


Kent 


212 


00 


5 


11 


136 


52 


7.21 


18 


40 


11 


39 


33.37 


Montgomery 


236 


67 


4 


68 


155 


54 


13.55 


31 


08 


15 


19 


16.63 


Prince George's . . 


192 


30 


3 


47 


135 


01 


12.18 


22 


44 


11 


73 


7.47 


Queen Anne's. . . . 


213 


66 


4 


55 


138 


67 


7.04 


15 


00 


8 


07 


40.33 


St. Mary's 


220 


63 


3 


07 


123 


74 


11.96 


29 


36 


14 


93 


37.57 




201 


82 


4 


15 


140 


94 


5.80 


11 


79 


11 


96 


27.18 


Talbot 


211 


65 


4 


26 


144 


66 


5.60 


18 


32 


11 


25 


27.56 




192 


77 


3 


51 


136 


73 


7.13 


16 


38 


12 


39 


16.63 




181 


02 


3 


30 


123 


71 


8.42 


13 


08 


8 


95 


23.56 




218 


15 


4 


19 


146 


51 


5.68 


18 


83 


8 


94 


34.00 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXII. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



154 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 91 

Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored Elementary Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 











Instructional Service 
















Total 


























County 


Current 






Salaries of 














Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Princ 


pals 


Oth 


er 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








vision! 


an 


d 










nan 


ce 


Services 












Teachers 


















Total State 






























.Baltimore city 






























Total Counties 


$198 


04 


$4 


31 


$132 


85 


$8 


60 


$17 


67 


$9 


70 


S24 


91 


Allegany 


203 


36 


5 


24 


151 


98 


9 


23 


23 


50 


7 


93 


5 


48 


Anne Arundel .... 


174 


55 


2 


18 


130 


05 


7 


37 


14 


35 


5 


49 


15 


11 


Baltimore 


232 


35 


7 


29 


164 


29 


15 


08 


15 


72 


16 


38 


13 


59 


Calvert 


167 


30 


5 


03 


107 


25 


4 


63 


8 


50 


11 


72 


30 


17 


Caroline 


186 


45 


4 


52 


122 


84 


5 


57 


10 


41 


3 


44 


39 


67 


Carrol! 


198 


28 


3 


76 


124 


13 


9 


90 


11 


51 


5 


63 


43 


35 


Cecil 


210 


15 


2 


49 


130 


05 


6 


89 


25 


99 


5 


33 


39 


40 


Charles 


218 


29 


2 


98 


144 


67 


13 


02 


18 


87 


4 


45 


34 


30 


Dorchester 


138 


06 


4 


75 


90 


31 


4 


77 


7 


08 


4 


56 


26 


59 


Frederick 


158 


16 


4 


77 


110 


66 


5 


73 


12 


98 


5 


03 


18 


99 


Garrett 






























Harford 


194 


92 


1 


62 


123 


55 


9 


68 


20 


55 


6 


93 


32 


59 


Howard 


184 


63 


6 


37 


124 


04 


7 


56 


13 


40 


2 


90 


30 


36 


Kent 


205 


79 


6 


24 


127 


06 


6 


12 


13 


92 


12 


45 


40 


00 


Montgomery 


334 


16 


6 


14 


194 


85 


12 


73 


58 


99 


30 


99 


30 


46 


Prince George's . . 


199 


76 


3 


30 


138 


85 


8 


96 


21 


81 


12 


36 


14 


48 


213 


49 


5 


30 


127 


35 


7 


15 


15 


32 


10 


87 


47 


50 


St. Mary's 


191 


98 


7 


29 


108 


66 


9 


13 


10 


39 


11 


90 


44 


61 


Somerset 


158 


88 


2 


93 


107 


93 


4 


29 


8 


99 


5 


46 


29 


28 


Talbot 


170 


61 


3 


20 


119 


04 


5 


19 


12 


96 


2 


72 


27 


50 


Washington 


197 


87 






150 


30 


7 


91 


20 


.43 


12 


32 


6 


91 


Wicomico 


171 


46 


4 


69 


124 


34 


6 


21 


7 


70 


4 


48 


24 


04 


Worcester 


158 


11 


5 


23 


105 


14 


5 


86 


8 


03 


2 


66 


31 


19 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, kindergartens, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXIII. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



155 



TABLE 92 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public High Schools: Year Ending 

June 30, 1955 









Instructional Service 














Total 
























County 


Current 






Salaries of 














Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 






visiont 


and 










nance 


Services 










Teachers 
















Total State 


$270.46 


$4 


90 


$194 


.09 


$16 


04 


$23 


89 


$11 


16 


$20.38 


Baltimore City 


295.39 


6 


19 


222.22 


14 


29 


31 


92 


11 


79 


8.98 


Total Counties 


260.41 


4 


38 


182 


76 


16 


75 


20 


64 


10 


91 


24.97 




250 19 


4 


69 


176 


70 


12 


86 


22 


48 


9 


70 


23 76 


Anne Arundel .... 


241 i 96 


3 


16 


171 


.16 


16 


40 


19 


22 


8 


17 


23^85 


Baltimore 


261.45 


5 


96 


174 


.16 


21 


69 


20 


16 


13 


93 


25.55 


Calvert 


280.58 


5 


27 


172 


36 


13 


58 


17 


25 


17 


88 


54.24 


Caroline 


284.48 


4 


55 


201 


80 


13 


03 


14 


18 


13 


23 


37.69 


Carroll 


248.08 


5 


69 


181 


45 


12 


22 


15 


98 


7 


93 


24.81 


Cecil 


290.93 


6 


98 


195 


66 


14 


87 


27 


74 


17 


97 


27.71 




236.25 


5 


38 


144 


63 


15 


98 


27 


61 


6 


51 


36.14 


Dorchester 


276.80 


3 


09 


185 


07 


11 


54 


29 


16 


8 


76 


39.18 


Frederick 


234.70 


3 


32 


169 


17 


10 


56 


15 


01 


9 


30 


27.34 


Garrett 


243.77 


3 


02 


147 


44 


11 


36 


14 


70 


7 


44 


59.81 


Harford 


255.98 


2 


76 


173 


08 


18 


28 


24 


82 


8 


21 


28.83 


Howard 


296.88 


5 


93 


208 


85 


16 


68 


16 


04 


12 


18 


37.20 


Kent 


306.53 


5 


77 


199 


86 


14 


07 


19 


38 


25 


69 


41.76 


Montgomery 


278.18 


3 


45 


224 


15 


20 


53 


14 


71 


7 


63 


7.71 


Prince George's . . 


254.81 


3 


51 


176 


94 


16 


03 


28 


81 


11 


53 


17.99 


Queen Anne's .... 


309.52 


5 


07 


205 


96 


13 


66 


21 


70 


14 


22 


48.91 


St. Mary's 


261.61 


4 


93 


154 


95 


14 


78 


16 


02 


20 


72 


50.21 




267.28 


6 


04 


186 


10 


8 


73 


18 


89 


8 


82 


38.70 


Talbot 


260.65 


4 


29 


185 


27 


14 


51 


22 


57 


6 


28 


27.73 




249.13 


4 


56 


181 


90 


14 


61 


15 


88 


12 


40 


19.78 


Wicomico 


246.21 


1 


97 


165 


18 


17 


12 


21 


00 


8 


47 


32.47 




299.25 


5 


40 


196 


13 


16 


09 


25 


32 


9 


58 


46.73 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXIV. 



156 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 93 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public White High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 











Instructional S 


ERVICE 
















Total 


























County 


Current 






Salaries of 














Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








vision! 


and 










nance 


Services 












Teachers 


















Total State 






























Baltimore City 






























Total Counties 


$259 


47 


$4 


42 


$183 


30 


$16 


91 


$20 


41 


$10 


95 


$23 


48 


Allegany 


248 


20 


4 


54 


175 


39 


12 


65 


22 


34 


9 


62 


23 


66 


Anne Arundel .... 


245 


14 


3 


93 


173 


82 


17 


25 


20 


04 


7 


61 


22 


49 


Baltimore 


257 


27 


5 


71 


171 


54 


21 


24 


19 


66 


13 


60 


25 


52 


Calvert 


300 


15 


5 


27 


176 


32 


14 


97 


17 


73 


24 


61 


61 


25 




288 


98 


4 


92 


206 


64 


13 


88 


14 


22 


15 


65 


33 


67 


Carroll 


247 


64 


5 


65 


181 


88 


12 


16 


16 


13 


7 


87 


23 


95 


Cecil 


288 


11 


6 


98 


195 


10 


14 


84 


26 


96 


18 


70 


25 


53 


Charles 


237 


14 


4 


63 


144 


67 


15 


82 


30 


45 


7 


18 


34 


39 




271 


36 


3 


58 


179 


53 


12 


54 


29 


73 


8 


88 


37 


10 


Frederick 


236 


29 


3 


27 


170 


99 


10 


55 


15 


23 


9 


25 


27 


00 


Garrett 


243 


77 


3 


02 


147 


44 


11 


36 


14 


70 


7 


44 


59 


81 


Harford 


254 


65 


2 


94 


172 


34 


17 


95 


24 


92 


8 


13 


28 


37 


Howard 


304 


76 


5 


57 


214 


63 


17 


07 


16 


85 


13 


46 


37 


18 


Kent 


309 


30 


5 


81 


207 


86 


13 


99 


20 


81 


23 


77 


37 


06 


Montgomery 


275 


47 


3 


49 


223 


21 


20 


47 


13 


86 


7 


16 


7 


28 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


252 


88 


3 


50 


177 


19 


16 


33 


28 


56 


11 


84 


15 


46 


320 


28 


4 


64 


213 


20 


14 


56 


23 


75 


17 


03 


47 


10 


St. Mary's 


260 


22 


4 


85 


151 


16 


14 


25 


17 


21 


20 


39 


52 


36 


Somerset 


295 


79 


6 


97 


205 


34 


10 


05 


22 


74 


9 


68 


41 


01 


Talbot 


270 


85 


6 


25 


191 


27 


15 


78 


22 


95 


6 


27 


28 


33 




248 


54 


4 


66 


181 


22 


14 


54 


15 


65 


12 


39 


20 


08 




244 


49 


1 


96 


165 


14 


17 


67 


20 


05 


10 


48 


29 


19 




312 


81 


5 


50 


212 


71 


16 


66 


25 


88 


10 


14 


41 


92 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXV. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



157 



TABLE 94 



Cost* per Pupil Belonging: Maryland Public Colored High Schools: 
Year Ending June 30, 1955 











Instructional Service 














Total 
























PfllTHTV 


Current 






Salaries of 














Other 




Expenses 


Super- 


Principals 


Other 


Operation 


Mainte- 


School 








visiont 


and 










nance 


Services 












Teachers 












































Baltimore City 




























Total Counties 


$266 


86 


$4 


07 


$178 


96 


$15 


59 


$22 


30 


$10 


62 


$35.32 


Allegany 


382 


52 


14 


63 


264 


27 


26 


48 


31 


87 


15 


02 


30.25 


Anne Arundel .... 


229 


01 






160 


32 


12 


92 


15 


91 


10 


44 


29.42 


Baltimore 


317 


43 


9 


21 


209 


37 


27 


74 


26 


81 


18 


31 


25.99 


Calvert 


256 


82 


5 


26 


167 


55 


11 


89 


16 


68 


9 


70 


45.74 


Caroline 


268 


75 


3 


26 


184 


87 


10 


07 


14 


05 


4 


77 


51.73 


Carroll 


255 


38 


6 


28 


174 


18 


13 


16 


13 


33 


9 


02 


39.41 


Cecil 


327 


87 


7 


00 


203 


03 


15 


34 


37 


88 


8 


51 


56.11 


Charles . 


235 


02 


6 


42 


144 


58 


16 


19 


23 


68 


5 


59 


38.56 


Dorchester 


291 


95 


1 


73 


200 


49 


8 


75 


27 


55 


8 


45 


44.98 


Frederick 


216 


42 


3 


95 


148 


31 


10 


59 


12 


49 


9 


90 


31.18 






























Harford 


265 


71 


i 


52 


178 


50 


20 


65 


24 


ii 


8 


81 


32^2 




263 


66 


7 


48 


184 


45 


15 


04 


12 


63 


6 


80 


37.26 


Kent 


299 


93 


5 


68 


180 


75 


14 


26 


15 


95 


30 


27 


53.02 


Montgomery 


318 


16 


2 


95 


238 


10 


21 


26 


27 


26 


14 


52 


14.07 


Prince George's . . 


267 


05 


3 


58 


175 


38 


14 


16 


30 


35 


9 


57 


34.01 


Queen Anne's .... 


281 


05 


6 


20 


186 


81 


11 


26 


16 


28 


6 


79 


53.71 


St. Mary's 


264 


59 


5 


10 


163 


08 


15 


91 


13 


48 


21 


43 


45.59 


Somerset 


224 


57 


4 


65 


157 


30 


6 


76 


13 


11 


7 


.51 


35.24 


Talbot 


238 


33 






172 


16 


11 


73 


21 


74 


6 


30 


26.40 


Washington 


274 


37 






211 


48 


17 


52 


25 


96 


12 


47 


6.94 


Wicomico 


251 


57 


2 


02 


165 


29 


15 


42 


23 


.93 


2 


24 


42.67 


Worcester 


271 


29 


5 


19 


161 


93 


14 


93 


24 


17 


8 


44 


56.63 



* Excludes administration, fixed charges, and federal funds for school lunches. 

t Consists of salaries and travel. 

For basic data, see TABLES VI and XXVI. 

Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



158 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 95 



Average Annual Salary per Maryland County Teacher and Principal: 1923-1955 







Average Annual Salary f 


er Teacher and Princd?al 




Year Ending 






I 






June 30 


White 


Colored 






Elementary 


High 


Elementary 


High 


1923 




$ 990 


$1,436 


$ 513 


$ 906 


1928 




1,155 


1,544 


602 


897 


1933 




1,231 


1,532 


657 


837 


1938 




1,295 


1,587 


745 


905 


1943 




1,539 


1,735 


1,291 


1,450 


1946 




2,027 


2,183 


1,737 


1,845 


1947. 




2,306 


2,439 


2,002 


2,100 


1948 




3,234 


3,446 


3,157 


3,178 


1949 




3,236 


3,318 


2,916 


2,885 


1950. 




3,342 


3,344 


3,023 


2,888 


1951. 




3,418 


3,359 


3,126 


2,934 






3,637 


3,646 


3,385 


3,272 


1953 




3,733 


3,726 


3,535 


3,358 


1954 




3,723 


3,853 


3,697 


3,518 


1955 




3,717 


4,191 


3,957 


3,764 



160 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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162 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

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166 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



167 



TABLE 104 

Expenditures of Public Funds for Pupil Transportation per Pupil Transported: 
Counties of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 










Average 


Expenditure 


FOR 


Transportation 










All Schools 


White Schools 


Colored Schools 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 


Total Counties 


$31 


79 


$31 


88 


$31 


69 


$30 


59 


$31 


06 


$30 


03 


$38 


47 


$36 


10 


$41 


74 


Allegany 


40 


71 


38 


40 


43 


38 


40 


49 


38 


43 


42 


88 


102 


17 


21 


00 


120 


61 


Anne Arundel 


25 


18 


23 


99 


26 


55 


23 


43 


22 


75 


24 


25 


32 


85 


29 


93 


35 


77 


Baltimore. . . . 


25 


40 


20 


99 


29 


69 


24 


80 


20 


53 


28 


84 


36 


59 


27 


83 


50 


21 


Calvert 


42 


82 


37 


19 


52 


62 


50 


50 


43 


99 


60 


48 


35 


17 


31 


04 


43 


37 


Caroline 


50 


82 


50 


62 


51 


10 


49 


50 


49 


31 


49 


78 


54 


53 


54 


74 


54 


27 


Carroll 


28 


91 


28 


08 


30 


13 


27 


53 


26 


53 


29 


02 


58 


14 


67 


45 


48 


88 


Cecil 


31 


66 


30 


56 


33 


36 


29 


72 


28 


80 


31 


18 


59 


48 


60 


41 


58 


48 


Charles 


35 


64 


35 


63 


35 


65 


35 


63 


35 


63 


35 


63 


35 


65 


35 


63 


35 


69 


Dorchester. . . 


59 


92 


58 


29 


62 


05 


57 


95 


58 


85 


56 


90 


64 


78 


57 


11 


78 


03 


Frederick. . . . 


33 


44 


30 


61 


37 


25 


32 


36 


29 


43 


36 


39 


49 


24 


50 


66 


47 


82 


Garrett 


60 


56 


63 


27 
38 


57 


65 


60 


56 


63 


27 
69 


57 


65 














Harford 


32 


83 


33 


31 


89 


33 


12 


33 


32 


13 


30 


98 


31 


28 


30 


53 


Howard 


33 


57 


32 


34 


35 


15 


33 


19 


31 


67 


35 


15 


35 


15 


35 


15 


35 


15 


Kent 


50 


73 


49 


69 


52 


13 


47 


55 


47 


11 


48 


17 


57 


98 


56 


05 


60 


27 


Montgomery 


25 


16 


33 


97 


11 


67 


25 


69 


35 


13 


11 


61 


21 


37 


26 


40 


12 


11 


Pr. George's. . 


18 


93 


17 


83 


19 


91 


16 


30 


16 


51 


16 


13 


30 


96 


22 


58 


41 


96 


Queen Anne's 


50 


87 


47 


99 


54 


90 


50 


52 


47 


55 


54 


66 


51 


68 


49 


00 


55 


47 


St. Mary's. . . 


47 


09 


46 


00 


48 


88 


45 


69 


42 


88 


50 


23 


50 


25 


52 


98 


45 


85 


Somerset .... 


48 


84 


45 


96 


52 


63 


53 


35 


47 


26 


61 


69 


43 


10 


44 


23 


41 


70 


Talbot 


45 


03 


50 


68 


38 


57 


50 


36 


56 


51 


43 


58 


36 


74 


42 


01 


30 


37 


Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 


29 


47 


29 


46 


29 


48 


29 


46 


29 


46 


29 


47 


30 


10 


29 


48 


30 


81 


47 


69 


47 


63 


47 


76 


48 


17 


49 


50 


46 


42 


46 


55 


43 


00 


50 


74 


Worcester . . . 


51 


16 


50 


44 


51 


99 


53 


74 


56 


82 


50 


51 


47 


47 


42 


25 


54 


41 



N.B.— Underlying data will be found in TABLES 102 and 103. 



168 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 105 

Number of Schools to Which Transportation Was Provided at Public Expense : 
Number of Vehicles Used : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


Total 
Number 
of 

Schools 


Number of Schools to Which 
Transportation Was Provided 


Number of Vehicles 


Total 


Schools 


for White Pupils 


oCflOOlS 

for 
Colored 
Pupils 


Buses Owned by 


Jrnvate 
Oars anu 
tation 
Wagons 

fK 


Ele- 
mentarv 
Only 


Com- 
bined 
Elem. & 
High 


High 
School 
Only 


County 


Con- 
tractors 




TV, to 1 Cfoto 


938 


719 










431 


1,376 


95 


Baltimore City . 


164 


15 












15 




Total Counties . 


774 


704 


390 


49 


101 


164 


431 


1,361 


95 


Allegany 


34 


29 


18 


4 


5 


2 




94 


11 


A. Arundel}:. . 


64 


57 


34 




8 


15 




117 


*3 


Baltimore. . . . 


77 


72 


45 


' 2 


12 


13 


74 


155 


3 


Calvert 


17 


16 


6 




2 


8 




38 


3 


Caroline 


13 


12 


3 


"5 




4 




43 


1 


Carroll 


21 


21 


8 


9 


2 


2 


5 


60 


* 4 


Cecil 


24 


23 


12 


4 


4 


3 


1 


56 


3 


Charles 


19 


19 


2 


4 


1 


12 




54 


10 


Dorchester. . . 


31 


29 


15 




4 


10 


' i 


53 


3 


Frederick .... 


38 


36 


21 


* 5 


3 


7 


18 


82 


*2 


Garrett 


25 


23 


21 




2 




2 


75 


tl5 


Harford 


23 


23 


16 




5 


' *2 


32 


86 


*4 


Howard 


16 


15 


6 


' 3 


2 


4 




49 




Kent 


16 


16 


7 


1 


2 


6 




35 


' *2 


Montgomery 


91 


80 


53 




15 


12 


138 






Pr. George's. . 


99 


76 


41 


1 


14 


20 


119 


32 




Queen Anne's 


15 


15 


9 




3 


3 




37 


' 9 


St. Mary's. . . 


21 


21 


11 




3 


7 




46 


13 


Somerset .... 


22 


20 


5 


' "3 


2 


10 




47 


t 


Talbot 


20 


20 


8 




2 


10 


' 2 


33 




Washington . 


45 


42 


31 


3 


7 


1 


38 


49 


*4 


Wicomico. . . . 


26 


22 


10 


3 


2 


7 




63 


3 


Worcester . . . 


17 


17 


8 


2 


1 


6 


' i 


57 


2 



* Each asterisk denotes one county-owned station wagon, 
t Excludes one horse in Garrett and one boat in Somerset. 

X Excludes elementary school at Bowie State Teachers College and bus carrying pupils there. 
Note: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



169 



TABLE 106— Federal Vocational Funds Allotted and Expended in Maryland: 

1954-55 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


1955 
Allotment 


1955 
Expenditures 


Balance, 
June 30, 1955 


Total 


$384,593.74 

103,634.31 
162,888.50 
87,440.00 
15,630.93 
15,000.00 


$365,109.17 

101,139.29 
145,910.13 

87,428.82 
15,630.93 
15,000.00 


$19,484.57 

2,495.02 
16,978.37 
11.18 


Agriculture 

Trades and Industry 

Home Economies 

Teacher Training and Supervision . . . 
Distributive Education 







TABLE 107 

Expenditures for Administration and Supervision and Teacher Training in Vocational 
Education : State of Maryland : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Source of Expenditures 


Type of Vocational Program 


Total 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total 

State and University Funds . 
Federal Funds 


$32,796.71 
28,773.70 

25,776.21 
27,044.20 

7,020.50 
1,729.50 


$9,188.81 
9,561.07 

7,688.81 
8,061.07 

1,500.00 
1,500.00 


$8,896.91 
9,664.26 

8,896.91 
9,664.26 


$14,710.99 
9,548.37 

9,190.49 
9,318.87 

5,520.50 
229.50 




State Administration and Super- 
vision 

State Funds 




Federal Funds 




Teacher Training 

University of Md. Funds. . . . 
Federal Funds 











170 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 108 — Expenditures of Federal Vocational Funds in Maryland: 

1954-55 



Type of 
Vocational Program 


All 

Subjects 


Agri- 
culture 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Distributive 
Education 


Total Expended in Maryland. . . . 

Instruction in Counties: 

Dav Schools— White 


$365,109.17 

139,845.97 
37,362.44 
45,738.00 

72,126.76 
22,272.25 
9,262.50 
2,971.55 

2,196.00 
4,220.00 
1,729.50 

27,044.20 
340.00 


$104,265.48 

74,382.73 
17,666.18 
2,655.50 


$151,800.65 

27,040.58 
5,311.25 
14,590.00 

72,126.76 
13,340.25 


$94,043.04 

35,981.16 
14,385.01 
28,492.50 


$15,000.00 
2,441.50 




Adult Education 




Instruction in Baltimore City: 
Day Schools 




Adult Education 




5,636.00 


3,296.00 
9,262.50 


Co-operative and Continuation 
Supervision 






2,971.55 

2,196.00 
4,220.00 




Instruction by the University of 
Maryland: 
Mining 








Volunteer Firemen 








Teacher Training and Guidance 

State Administration and Super- 
vision 


1,500.00 
8,061.07 


229.50 
9,318.87 




9,664.26 
340.00 




Nursing Aide Instruction 













Maryland State Department of Education 



171 



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172 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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173 



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174 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 112— Expenditures for Adult Education in Maryland: 1954-55 













Per 


Cent 


OF 


1 








Expenditures 


for Salaries 




Salaries 




Expendi- 
























tures for 


Receipts 


County 




















Purposes 


from 












Fed- 








Other 


Fees 






Federal 


State 


Other 


eral 


State 


Other 


than 






Total 


Funds 


Funds 


Funds 


Funds 


Funds 


Funds 


Salaries 




Total State 


$451,260.48 


$68,010.25 


$72,450.00 


$310,800.23 


15 


1 


16.0 


68 


9 


$16,229.88 


$55,436.41 


Baltimore City 


316,159.69 


22,272.25 


20,000.00 


273,887.44 


7 


1 


6.3 


86 


6 


6,855.90 




Total Counties 


135,100.79 


45,738.00 


52,450.00 


36,912.79 


33 


9 


38.8 


27 


3 


9,373.98 


55,436.41 




9,934.50 


4,090.00 


5,122.00 


722.50 


41 


2 


51.5 


7 


3 


66.81 


2,980.27 




3,520.00 


1,006.50 


2,421.50 


92.00 


28 


6 


68.8 


2 


6 


6.00 


958.00 


Baltimore 


30,933.50 


12,748.00 


9,577.11 


8,608.39 


41 


2 


31.0 


27 


8 


3,264.92 


8,950.00 


Calvert 


909.00 


348.00 


528.00 


33.00 


38 


3 


58.1 


3 


6 






Caroline 


315.00 


315.00 




100.0 






28.00 


62.00 


Carroll 


2,196.50 


589.50 


1,003.74 


603.26 


26 


8 


45.7 


27 


5 


156.00 


430.55 


Cecil 


1,311.00 


735.00 


576.00 




56 


1 


43.9 






138.51 


241.00 


Charles 


2,122.50 


874.50 


1,046.50 


201.50 


41 


2 


49.3 


9 


5 


Dorchester 


1,817.75 


630.00 


1,046.06 


141.69 


34 


7 


57.5 




8 


30.00 


32.00 


Frederick 


662.50 


82.50 


560.64 


19.36 


12 


5 


84.6 


2 


9 




68.00 


Garrett 


1,290.25 


273.50 


884.75 


132.00 


21 


2 


68.6 


10 


2 






11,623.00 


2,058.00 


7,579.73 


1,985.27 


17 


.7 


65.2 


17 


1 


36.06 


3,122.78 


Howard 


491.00 


66.00 


425.00 




13 


4 


86.6 






67.00 




Kent 


245.00 


245.00 






100.0 






219.86 


133.25 


Montgomery 


31,602.25 


7,788.00 


8,033.36 


15,780.89 


24 


.7 


25.4 


49 


.9 


3,229.46 


23,921.52 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 
St. Mary's 


20,081.54 


7,770.00 


5,783.46 


6,528.08 


38 


.7 


28.8 


32 


5 


2,016.83 


8,721.50 


758.50 


110.00 


637.00 


11.50 


14 


5 


84.0 




5 






110.00 




110.00 






100.0 






15.00 






110.00 




110.00 








100.0 








Talbot 


1,112.50 


705.50 


264.00 


143.00 


63 


4 


23.7 


12 


9 


9.56 


301.50 


Washington 


10,559.00 


5,102.00 


3,627.80 


1,829.20 


48 


3 


34.4 


17 


3 


67.06 


5,253.04 


Wicomico 


2,213.50 


431.50 


1,782.00 




19 


5 


80.5 






22.91 


261.00 


Worcester 


1,182.00 


329.50 


771.35 


81.15 


27 


9 


65.2 


6 


9 

























Maryland State Department of Education 



175 



TABLE 113 — Adult Education Classes: Number of Teachers and Enrollment 
by Subject: State of Maryland : 1954-55 



County 


Number 
of 

Teachers 


Enrollment 


Total 


Agri- 
culture 


Home 
Economics 


Industrial 
Education 


Business 
Education 


General 


Total State 


1 ,016 


29 


,456 


469 


5,548 


2 ,474 


4,811 


16 


,154 


Baltimore City 


516 


13 


,491 




1 ,570 


874 


732 


10 


,315 




500 


15 


,965 


469 


3,978 


1 ,600 


4,079 


5 


,839 


Allegany 


39 


1 


,208 


52 


410 


117 


224 




405 


Anne Arundel .... 


20 




630 


20 


120 


34 


323 




133 


Baltimore 


130 


3 


,182 




681 


628 


764 


1 


,109 


Calvert 


9 




244 


17 


54 




47 




126 


Caroline 


1 




28 












28 


Carroll 


10 




331 




32 


84 


68 




147 


Cecil 


6 




116 






21 


95 






Charles 


9 




214 




' 81 




96 




37 


Dorchester 


16 




356 


' 83 


45 




105 




123 


Frederick 


4 




75 


15 






21 




39 


Garrett 


9 




192 


43 






71 




78 


Harford 


53 


1 


,106 


21 


175 


' 37 


294 




579 


Howard 


6 




131 


25 






72 




34 


Kent 


3 




63 








23 




40 


Montgomery 


92 


3 


,290 


39 


1 ,159 


' 70 


389 


1 


,633 


Prince George's . . 
Queen Anne's. . . . 


56 


2 


,500 




942 


106 


855 




597 


4 




82 


"l4 






56 




12 


St. Mary's 


2 




34 












34 


Somerset 


1 




20 












20 


Talbot 


5 




138 


57 


' 42 




16 




23 


Washington 


20 


1 


,494 


66 


154 


503 


323 




448 




3 




328 


17 


37 




146 




128 




2 




203 




46 




91 




66 



176 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 114 



Adult Education Program : Titles of Courses Offered : 
of Maryland: 1954-55 



Counties 



Title of Course 



Agriculture 

Agriculture 

Farm Practices 

Total 

Home Economics 

Clothing Construction 

Cooking 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Interior Decorating 

Millinery 

Slip Covers 

Total 

Trades and Industry 

Aerodynamics 

Automobile Mechanics 

Blueprint Reading 

Building Trades 

Cosmetology 

Electric Arc and Acetylene Welding 

Electronics 

Familiarization 

Human Relations 

Industrial Safety 

Machine Shop 

Master Lines 

Mechanical Drawing 

Radio and Television 

Shop Math 

Statistical Quality Control 

Technical Illustration 

Use and Care of Transit 

Welding 

Wood Shop 

Total 



Number 
of Classes 



Title of Course 



27 



137 
2 
13 
12 
9 
19 
3 

195 



Business Education 

Bookkeeping 

Business Education . 

Shorthand 

Typing 



Total. 



General 

Americanization 

Art 

Arts and Crafts 

Ceramics 

Dramatics 

Driver Education 

English 

First Aid 

General Education 

High School Certificate 

Home Crafts 

Home Economics 

Industrial Education 

Jewelry and Gem Cutting 

Law 

Lip Reading 

Mathematics 

Modern Foreign Language 

Music — Instrumental and Vocal 

Physical Education 

Psychology 

Public Speaking 

Real Estate 

Recreation 

Science 

Shop 

Social Studies 

Upholstering 

Woodwork and Metalcraft 



i Number 
of Cb.sses 



Total. 



10 
4 
44 
103 

161 



51 
11 
28 
2 
10 
2 
3 
3 
34 
5 
1 
26 
8 
1 
1 
5 
8 
17 
13 
2 
8 
1 
7 
1 
6 
1 
4 
50 

314 



Maryland State Department of Education 



177 



TABLE 115 — Enrollment in Adult Education Classes: Baltimore City 
1953, 1954, and 1955 



Type of Class 



Total 

Americanization 

Elementary 

Secondary 

Commercial (Distributive Education) . . . . 
Vocational: 

Industrial 

Home Economics 

Parent Education 

Industrial Training (General) 

Informal Program (Noncredit) 

Speech and Lip Reading Classes 

Vocational Education (Veterans) 

Foremanship and Apprentice Training . . . 

Total Number of Principals and Teachers 



Net Roll, February 



1953 



13 ,491 

693 
613 

1 ,632 

2 ,396 

823 
1 ,294 
2,341 

373 
1 ,868 
32 

499 

927 



514 



1954 


1955 


14 ,589 


14,667 


670 


751 


850 


820 


1 ,980 


4,478 


2 ,743 


732 


824 


874 


1 ,537 


1 ,570 


2 ,087 


2 ,087 


413 


325 


2 ,046 


1 ,854 


514 


263 


925 


913 


536 


516 



178 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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180 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 118 

Participation and Reimbursement Paid : Special School Milk Program : 
Maryland Public Schools: 1954-55* 



County 


Number of 
Approved Schools 
Participating 
in Program 


Per Cent of Total 
Schools in State 
Participating 
in Program 


Total Number 
of One-Half 
r"ints Milk 

Reimbursable 


Reimbursement 
Paid 


Total State 


713 


76.0 


4,209,820 


$152,383.79 


Baltimore City 


159 


96.9 


621,246 


22,299.49 


Total Counties 


554 


71.6 


3,588,574 


130,084.30 


Allegany 


32 


94.1 


138,255 


5,530.20 


Anne Arundel 


64 


100.0 


180,664 


6,434.03 


Baltimore 


33 


42.9 


638,049 


21,811.27 


Calvert 


8 


47.1 


23,680 


852.85 




3 


23.1 


11,970 


478.80 


Carroll 


17 


80.9 


74,007 


2,745.13 


Cecil 


18 


75.0 


49,618 


1,«79.10 


Charles 








Dorchester 


ii 


35.5 


76,376 


2,594.09 


Frederick 


40 


100.0 


150,027 


5,470.50 


Garrett 


9 


36.0 


119,399 


4,767.48 


Harford 


23 


100.0 


123,860 


4,482.49 




16 


100.0 


107,175 


4,138.74 


Kent 


14 


87.5 


39,280 


1,497.02 


Montgomery 


86 


94.5 


537,106 


19,217.30 


Prince George's 


76 


76.8 


859,163 


31,162.50 


Queen Anne's 


14 


93.3 


81,728 


3,028.75 














10 


45.5 


14,735 


540.54 


Talbot 


4 


20.0 


61,112 


2,056.19 


Washington 


43 


95.5 


137,904 


5,188.73 


Wicomico 


27 


100.0 


104,302 


4,203.94 


Worcester 


6 


35.3 


60,164 


2,004.65 



* Program not in operation in Maryland prior to November 1954. 
January 1955. 



Maximum participation reached in 



Maryland State Department of Education 



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co t> t-eof 
o t> cn ioh 
x"ire* hh eo" 
coireeorH 

f ire CD rH 



rH t-H ire t~ rH 
COf t- rH CO 

o cn co_t> ire_ 

f*t>drH o* 

coxcneoco 
f cn f ire co 



cof ocncn 
x ire r-f o 
co en en o eo 



cn 01 o eo ire 
f x o cn x 
ire t> en d x 
en x f co co 
x^o: cn x^oj 
do*f*eo"co" 
eo irecn eo x 

XCOCOrH 



OHO 

CO 01 CO 

oi^ire^cn 
x"eo"cn" 
o ire ire 
ire x eo 



x m t-hco o 



Eh » tH 



o ^ 
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I82 
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182 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 120 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness Related to Assessed Valuation: 

June 30, 1955 





School Bonded Indebtedness as of 


1954 Assessed 


Assessed 


Per Cent 






June 30, 1955 


Valuation 


Valuation 


School 










Taxable at 


Der Dollar of 


Bonded 


County 




v^ounty 


State 


Full Rate for 


School 


Indebtedness 




Total 


Bonds 


Loanf 


County 


Bonded 


Is of Assess- 










Purposes 


Indebtedness 


ed Valuation 


Total State 


$222,808,585 




Am oftft 


$5,818,083,879 


$26 


3.8 


Baltimore City 


*54,491,000 


54,491,000 




J2, 330,272, 879 


43 


2.3 


Total Counties. 


168,317,585 


114. Q1 fi t« t* 


/ini nnn 

Oo,<4Ul,UUU 


3,487,811,000 


21 


4.8 


Allegany 


4,830,000 


2,640,000 


2,190,000 


J149, 656,396 


31 


3.2 


Anne Arundel 


16,865,254 


12,064,000 


4,801,254 


1202,550,064 


12 


8.3 


Baltimore 


47,324,583 


32,449,000 


14,875,583 


J908, 619^495 


19 


5 2 


Calvert 


1,300,164 


759,000 


541,164 


15.833,645 


12 


8^2 


Caroline 


532,534 


35,000 


497,534 


26,375,463 


49 


2.0 


Carroll 


1,800,000 


1,000,000 


800,000 


83,047,652 


46 


2.2 


Cecil 


2,455,441 


1,975,000 


480,441 


£73,508,395 


30 


3.3 


Charles 


1,529,293 


594,000 


935,293 


27,495,545 


18 


5.6 


Dorchester . . . 


3,473,740 


2,567,740 


906,000 


58,559,850 


17 


5.9 


Frederick 


1,867,404 


124,000 


1,743,404 


121,471,385 


65 


1.5 


Garrett 


1,565,928 


1,050,000 


515,928 


28,448,479 


18 


5.5 


Harford 


6,176,047 


4,975,000 


1,201,047 


J129.182.494 


21 


4.8 


Howard 


2,830,368 


1,647,470 


1,182,898 


39,897.420 


14 


7.1 


Kent 


1,183,838 


650,000 


533,838 


25,338,155 


21 


4.7 


Montgomery. . 


36,195,850 


28,210,875 


7,984,975 


$705,258,380 


19 


5 1 


Prince George's 


23,424,363 


17,024,000 


6,400,363 


J447.576.432 


19 


5.2 


Queen Anne's . 


1,509,166 


926,000 


583,166 


33,005,167 


22 


4 6 


St. Mary's 


830,630 




830,630 


30,535,028 


37 


2.7 


Somerset 


957,413 


1,500 


955,913 


20,749,229 


22 


4.6 


Talbot 


1,465,891 


450,000 


1,015,891 


42,392,435 


29 


3 5 


Washington . . . 


2,622,000 


100,000 


2,522,000 


Jl 76,899,588 


67 


1.5 


Wicomico ... 


5,967,678 


4,504,000 


1,463,678 


86,728,026 


15 


6.9 


Worcester .... 


1,610,000 


1,170,000 


440,000 


54,682,277 


34 


2.9 



* Includes sinking fund balance of $2,408,553.59. 

t General School Construction Loan. 

J Excludes valuation of Federal Housing Authority. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



183 



TABLE 121 

Maryland Public School Bonded Indebtedness* and Interest Payments per Pupil 

Belonging: 1954-55 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City . 

Total Counties . 

Allegany 
Anne Arundel 
Baltimore . . . 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . 
Frederick .... 



School 






School 




Bonded 


Interest 




Bonded 


Interest 


Indebted- 


Payments 


County 


Indebted- 


Payments 


ness 






ness 




$494.17 


$10.87 


Garrett 


$339 46 


$6 48 




Harford 


501 42 


9.63 


386.81 


7.63 


Howard 


538.19 


9 28 






Kent 


404 . 59 


7.88 


542.91 


12.34 


Montgomery 


757.39 


18.30 


309.54 


6.59 


Prince George's 


509 . 58 


11.55 


636 . 54 


13.87 


Queen Anne's 


472 . 06 


6.09 


823.01 


20.51 


St. Mary's 


199 . 43 


3.42 


393.75 


10.73 


Somerset 


241 . 89 


4.01 


135.75 


2.41 


Talbot 


378.98 


5 63 


199.60 


2.99 


Washington 


159.99 


2.98 


312 71 


6.14 


Wicomico 


757.22 


17 67 


255.78 


5.33 


Worcester 


341.46 


4 26 


647.24 


15.72 








156 41 


2.93 









* Includes General School Construction Loan. 



TABLE 122 

Value of Public School Property per Pupil : State of Maryland : 1923-1955 



Year 


Value of School Property* 


Value per Pupil 
















Total 


Baltimore 


Total 


Total 


Baltimore 


Total 




State 


City 


Counties 


State 


City 


Counties 


1923 


$22,236,638 


$10,440,008 


$11,796,630 


$87 


$100 


$77 


1928 


51,765,517 


32,770,847 


18,994,670 


191 


291 


120 


1933 


66,030,676 


40,679,936 


25,350,740 


225 


335 


147 


1938 


81,336,202 


49,633,230 


31,702,972 


277 


410 


184 


1943 


89,953,989 


50,463,694 


39,490,295 


300 


430 


217 


1946 


94,935,593 


49,726,430 


45,209,163 


320 


442 


245 


1947 


96,879,433 


49,800,279 


47,079,154 


322 


440 


251 


1948 


104,461,410 


50,639,234 


53,822,176 


338 


437 


278 


1949 


120,474,231 


50,258,400 


70,215,831 


373 


428 


342 


1950 


147,205,363 


50,659,159 


96,546,204 


429 


417 


435 


1951 


179,725,597 


50,659,159 


129,066,438 


490 


405 


533 


1952 


205,918,642 


50,647,823 


155,270,819 


533 


394 


603 


1953 


255,771,447 


61,881,725 


193,889,722 


619 


455 


699 


1954f 


309,979,448 


83,299,575 


226,679,873 


733 


620 i 


786 


1955f 


374,974,771 


111,128,307 


263,846,464 


832 


789 


851 



* Excludes administration buildings, warehouses, storage buildings, and school buildings under con- 
struction or no longer in use. 

t See footnotes on page 184, TABLE 123. 



184 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 123 

Value* of Maryland School Property per Pupil Belonging : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore Cityf. . 

Total Counties. . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert . 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 

St. Ma-y's 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



All School 



Total 
Value 



Average 
per Pupil 



Schools for White 
Pupils 



Schools for Colored 
Pupils 



$374,974,771 

111,128,307 

263,846,464 

13,626,500 ! 
23,264,029 
48,904,229 
2,110,400 
2,443,204 

6,764,100 
7,391,600 
6,107,455 
7,891,380 
8,086,805 

4,132,510 
12,555,492 
3,230,500 
2,199,200 
41,487,535 

35,854,327 
2,625,645 
2,426,015 
2,383,131 
3,327,160 

12,044,970 
10,908,027 
4,082,250 



$831.62 

788.86 

851.04 

873.25 
878.05 
850.48 
639 21 
622.84 

750.06 
941.37 
1,021.52 
1,470.24 
677.37 

895 . 88 
1,019.34 
614.28 
751.53 
868.12 

779.99 
821.33 
582 . 50 
602.01 
860.09 

734.95 
1,384.13 
865.71 



Total 


Average 


Total 


Average 


Value 


per Pupil 


Value 


per Pupil 


















$234,834,656 


$867 


11 


$29,011,808 


$740 


06 


13,268,300 


864 


37 


358,200 


1,409 


68 


18 829,031 


878 


33 


4,434,998 


876 


86 


45,880.843 


854 


33 


3,023,386 


796 


09 


1,243.000 


757 


83 


867,400 


522 


09 


2,021,925 


664 


28 


421,279 


479 


33 


6,426,100 


750 


33 


338,000 


744 


99 


6,742,800 


914 


66 


648,800 


1,351 


39 


4,583,533 


1,388 


70 


1,523,922 


569 


01 


6,551,025 


1,795 


79 


1,340,355 


779 


55 


7,510,155 


691 


42 


576,650 


535 


62 


4.132,510 


895 


88 








10,798,700 


982 


03 


1,756,792 


1,329 


89 


2,854,700 


673 


82 


375,800 


367 


57 


1,663,100 


797 


96 


536,100 


636 


62 


39,279,185 


874 


23 


2,208,350 


772 


15 


31,180,386 


781 


95 


4,673,941 


767 


19 


1,993,345 


862 


99 


632,300 


712 


85 


2,068,000 


712 


78 


358,015 


283 


25 


1,699,511 


716 


13 


683,620 


431 


20 


2,539,410 


972 


65 


787,750 


626 


39 


11,463,970 


713 


49 


581,000 


1,807 


72 


8,182,877 


1,384 


98 1 


2,725,150 


1.381 


57 


3,922,250 


1,308 


90 j 


160,000 


93 


08 



* Value based on 100 per cent of the insured valuation for each school building and the equipment 
thereof. Value of sites has been excluded. 

t Baltimore City shows value of buildings and equipment as carried by the Bureau of Accounts and 
Disbursements; this valuation does not constitute the basis for insurance. 

NOTE: Break-down for Baltimore City not available. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



185 



TABLE 124 

Calculated Maryland County School Tax Rates and Published County Tax Rates: 

1954-55 



County 


Calculated Public School Tax Rates* 


Total 


Current 
Expenses 


Debt Service 
and Capital 
Outlay 


Total State 


$1 


32 


$1 


08 


$0 


24 


Baltimore City 


1 


17 


1 


07 





10 




1 


42 


1 


08 





34 


Allegany 


1 


20 





97 





23 


Anne Arundel . . 


1 


40 


al 


02 





38 


Baltimore 


1 


34 


al 


05 





29 


Calvert 


1 


70 


al 


16 





54 




1 


05 





99 





06 


Carroll 


1 


20 





94 





26 


Cecil 


1 


22 


aO 


89 





33 


Charles 


1 


54 


aO 


92 





62 


Dorchester 


1 


07 





83 





24 


Frederick 


1 


12 


aO 


96 





16 


Garrett 


1 


20 





75 





45 


Harford 




04 


aO 


81 





23 


Howard 


1 


30 


al 


02 





28 


Kent 


1 


40 


1 


03 





37 


Montgomery. . . . 


1 


63 


al 


27 





36 


Prince George's . 
Queen Anne's . . 


1 


83 


al 


31 





52 


1 


36 


1 


01 





35 







83 


aO 


63 





20 


Somerset 




34 





99 





35 


Talbot 


1 


23 





91 





32 


Washington 

Wicomico 


1 


27 


1 


09 





18 


1 


59 





96 





63 


Worcester 


1 


25 


aO 


93 





32 



Published 
Tax Ratest 



$2.82 



1 


80 


$0 


10— $1 


36 


1 


94 





75— 1 


39 


1 


98 








1 


65 





75— 1 


00 




50 





25— 1 


15 


1 


47 





50— 


85 


1 


45 





20— 1 


28 


1 


55 





50— 


80 




60 





50— 1 


25 


1 


40 





10— 1 


50 


2 


00 





40— 


90 


1 


40 





85— 1 


00 


1 


85 








1 


50 





10— 


80 


1 


93 





08— 1 


00 


1 


98 





25— 2 


14 


1 


65 





20— 


90 


1 


50 




90 




1 


65 





60— 1 


50 


1 


75 





20— 1 


25 


1 


50 





35— 


85 


1 


78 





30— 1 


12 


1 


50 





95— 1 


40 



* Calculated by dividing tax funds received by County Boards of Education by total assessed valua- 
tions, as used in calculation of State aid payments. 

t Rates are for fiscal period on which district operates. State property tax and special service 
levies are excluded. 

t Figures are from reports made to State Fiscal Research Bureau. 

° Calendar year fiscal period. 

a Excludes federal funds authorized by Public Law 874 and/or Public Law 874 as amended. 



186 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CHART 4 

Per Cent of Total Revenues Appropriated for Public Schools: Counties and 
Incorporated Places in Maryland: 1954-55 (1954*) 



County 



Total 



■Current 
Expenses 
10 20 

I 1 r 



□ Debt Service and 
Capital Outlay 

30 h0 50 60 70 



Total State 


U7.3 


38.7 


Baltimore City 


hO.O 


36.h 


Total Counties 


53.0 


U0.5 


Kent 


69.5 


51.0 


Montgomery 


60.3 


U6.9 


Caroline 


U8.7 


U5.7 


Cecil 


61.6 


U5.0 


TTir.ce 3eorge's 


61.6 


hh.i 


Baltimore 


5U.2 


U3.3 


Queen Anne ' s 


57.6 


12.6 


Somerset 


55.1; 


Ul.o 


Washington 


17.9 


38.9 


Worcester 


51.U 


38.U 


Harford 


1*8.2 


37.7 


Frederick 




37.5 


Calvert 


5U.6 


37. h 


Dorchester 


U6.9 


37.1; 


Carroll 


b7.7 


35.1 


Talbot 


U7.3 


3U.9 


Howard 


hk.O 


3U.a 


Allegany 


U.l 


33.2 


A imp Arundel 


b3.1 


31.3 


Wicomico 


50.5 


30.5 


St. Mary' 8 


33.6 


25.A 


Charles 


U2.3 


25.2 


Garrett 


21*. 2 


15.5 




Calendar year 1954 



Maryland State Department of Education 



187 



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188 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 126 

1954-55 Valuation of Property Assessable at Full Rate for County Purposes: 

State of Maryland 



County 



Total State 

Baltimore City . . . . 

Total Counties. . . . 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore .... 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester . . . 
Frederick . . . . 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery . . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's. . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . 
Wicomico .... 
Worcester 



Total 
Assessable at 
Full Rate* 



$5,846,456,984 

2,347,539,379 

3,498,917.605 

149,673,268 
202,712,456 
912,407,374 
15,833,645 
26,375,463 

83.047,652 
74,192,945 
27,556,685 
58,559,850 
121,577,977 

28,448,479 
133,412,736 
39,897,420 
25,338,155 
706,526,445 

448,255,730 
33,005,167 
30,535,028 
20,749,229 
42,392,435 

177,009,163 
86,728,026 , 
54,682,277 j 



by 

Local Public 
Authority 



$4,592,578,979 

1,796,242,279 

2,796,336,700 

103,504,806 
180,362,374 
672,933,405 
14,119,115 
21,426,273 

64,153,102 
49,480,295 
22,843,985 
40,932.950 
89,370,735 

19,790,389 
94,943,344 
31,500,610 
21,039,105 
639,290,550 

387,187,182 
28,969,797 
25,168,398 
16,914,449 
36,172,355 

126,443,458 
64,009,056 
45,780,967 



Federal 
Housing 
Authority 



$28,373,105 

17,266,500 

11,106,605 

16,872 
162,392 
3,787,879 



684,550 
61,140 



106,592 
4,230,242 



1,268,065 
679,298 



by 

State Tax 
Commissiont 



109,575 



$1,225,504,900 

534,030,600 

691,474,300 

46,151,590 
22,187,690 
235,686,090 
1,714,530 
4,949,190 

18,894,550 
24,028,100 
4,651,560 
17,626,900 
32,100,650 

8,658,090 
34,239,150 
8,396,810 
4,299,050 
65,967,830 

60,389,250 
4,035,370 
5,366,630 
3,834,780 
6,220,080 

50,456,130 
22,718,970 
8,901,310 



Classes 
A through J 
Motor 
Vehicles}: 



$252,227,649 

71,584,876 

180,642,773 

6,187,555 
12,553,956 
37,555,278 
1,632,757 
3,163,067 

7,028,537 
4,964,086 
3,374,355 
3,120,766 
8,556,179 

1,936,900 
8,101,128 
3,312,892 
2,196,100 
25,032,228 

21,922,753 
2,122,236 
4,795,227 
1,937,848 
2,692,829 

10,463,978 
4,812,935 
3,179,183 



* Excludes classes A through J motor vehicles. 

r Data are for the year ended December 31, 1954, adjusted as of October, 1955. 

X Estimated by dividing net receipts after distribution to incorporated towns and places by the county 
ix rate. 

Fiscal period ends December 31; all others end June 30. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



189 



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190 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 128 

Assessable Wealth Back of Each Maryland Public School Pupil Belonging : 1954-55 



County 



Total Basis Assessable at 
Full Rate for County 
Purposes 



Number of 
Pupils Belongingt 



Wealth per Pupil 



Total State 

Baltimore City .... 

Total Counties 

Allegany 

Anne Arundel . 

Baltimore 

Calvert 

Caroline 

Carroll 

Cecil 

Charles 

Dorchester. . . . 
Frederick 

Garrett 

Harford 

Howard 

Kent 

Montgomery. . 

Prince George's 
Queen Anne's. . 
St. Mary's. . . . 

Somerset 

Talbot 

Washington . . . 

Wicomico 

Worcester 



$5,846,458,984 

*2,347,539,379 

3,498,917,605 

149,673,268 
*202, 712,456 
*912,407,374 
15,833,645 
26,375,463 

*83,047,652 
74,192,945 
27,556,685 
*58,559,850 
*121,577,977 

*28,448,479 
="133,412,736 
*39,897,420 
*25,338,155 
706,526,445 

448,255,730 
*33,005,167 
30,535,028 
20,749,229 
42,392,435 

*177,009,163 
86,728,026 
54,682,277 



450,898 



310,027 

15,604 
26,495 
57,502 
3,302 
3,923 

9,018 
7,852 
5,979 
5,367 
11,938 

4,613 
12,317 
5,259 
2,926 
47,790 

45,968 
3,197 
4,165 
3,959 
3,868 

16,389 
7,881 
4,715 



$12,966 

16,664 

11,286 

9,592 
7,651 
15,867 
4,795 
6,723 

9,209 
9,449 
4,609 
10,911 
10,184 

6,167 
10,831 
7,587 
8,660 
14,784 

9,751 
10,324 
7,331 
5,241 
10,960 

10,800 
11,005 
11,597 



* Calendar year (1954). 

t Includes kindergarten and prekindergarten pupils. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



191 



CHART 5 

State Individual Income Tax per Capita: Counties of Maryland and Baltimore 

City : 1954-55 



County 


Amount 


Total State 


12. Sh 


Baltinore City- 


12.80 


Total Counties 


12.23 


Montgomery 


25.22 


Baltimore 


16.92 


Talbot 


12.73 


Prince George's 


11.85 


Washington 


9.97 


Hovard 


9. 51 


Anne Arundel 


8.99 


Harford 


8.86 


Cecil 


8.29 


Kent 


8.19 


Wicomico 


8.16 


Frederick 


7.28 


Queen Anne's 


6.79 


Carroll 


6.53 


Charles 


6.09 


Allegany 


5.89 


Dorchester 


5.77 


Worcester 


U.89 


Caroline 


U.7U 


Calvert 


U.OU 


Somerset 


3.51 


St. Mary's 


3.25 


Garrett 


2.12 



Per Capita Income Tax 
10 15 



20 



25 





Sources: Report of the Comptroller of the Treasury, Fiscal Year 1955; 1954-55 population estimates 
from Maryland State Health Department. 



192 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



CHART 5 

Per Capita Income Payments in Eleven States, Including Maryland: 1953-54 



State 



1 Nevada 



2 Delaware 



3 Connecticut 



h New Jersey 



j> New York 



6 California 



7 Illinois 



8 Michigan 



9 Ohio 



10 Washington 



U Maryland 



Per Capita Income Payments 
Amount tin Hundreds of Dollars ) 

9 18 27 

M i j i i | i 1 1 



2,lOli 
2,372 
2,361 
2,219 

2,163 
2,162 
2,155 
2,017 
1,983 
1,91*9 
1,9U0 




Sourc?: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey ?/ Current Bi$ine8t, September, 1955. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



193 



CHART 7 

Per Capita Income Payments in Maryland: 1929-1954 

20__ . . . 



1> 

























\ 










V 








as 


>9 19 


36 19 


U3 19 


$0 19 



Year 

Source: U. S. Department of Commerce, Survey of Current Business, September, 1955. 



194 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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196 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 131 



Total Enrollment* at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fall of 1945-1954 



Fall of 


Grand 
Total 


Total 
White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Total 
Colored 


Bowie 


COPPIN 


1945 


823 


580 


150 


163 


267 


243 


121 


122 


1946 


1,286 


1,032 


329 


248 


455 


254 


129 


125 


1947 


1,489 


1,178 


258 


310 


610 


311 


152 


159 


1948 


1,725 


1,393 


357 


300 


736 


332 


160 


172 


1949 


2,098 


1,688 


444 


340 


904 


410 


210 


200 


1950 


2,054 


1,634 


441 


273 


920 • 


420 


221 


199 


1951 


1,944 


1,496 


403 


213 


880 


448 


268 


180 


1952 


2,136 


1,609 


478 


266 


865 


527 


323 


204 


1953 


2,307 


1,727 


438 


329 


960 


580 


334 


246 


1954 


2,692 


2,074 


501 


446 


1,127 


618 


329 


289 



* Includes all students registered, i.e., those in teachers college, junior college, and extension and special students. 



TABLE 132— Enrollment bv College and Class: Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 

Fall of 1954 



Maryland State Teachers College Enrollment 



Class 




















Grand 


Total 








Total 








Total 


White 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Colored 


Bowie 


Coppin 


TEACHER TRAINING 


Total 


2,091 


1,473 


363 


206 


904 


618 


329 


289 


Freshmen 


763 


576 


146 


69 


361 


187 


78 


109 


Sophomores. . . 


505 


360 


79 


53 


228 


145 


83 


62 


Juniors 


447 


285 


80 


46 


159 


162 


88 


74 




376 


252 


58 


38 


156 


124 


80 


44 








JUNIOR 


COLLEGE 








Total 


375 


375 


88 


131 


156 








Freshmen 


294 


294 


62 


114 


118 








Sophomores. . . 


81 


81 


26 


17 


38 














OTHER 


STUDENTS 








Extension or 




















226 


226 


50 


109 


67 








Elementary School. 


680 


583 


162 


157 


264 


97 


97 





Maryland State Department of Education 



197 



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198 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 134 

Enrollment in Junior Colleges of Maryland State Teachers Colleges: By County — Class: 

Fall of 1954 











White Enrollment 


Colored Enrollment 


Area 


Grand Total 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Towson 


Bowie 


Coppin 




Total 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores' 


Fresh- 
men 


Sopho- 
mores 


Total State 


375 


294 


81 


62 


26 


114 


17 


118 


38 










Out-of-State 


22 


20 


2 


1 


18 


2 


1 










Baltimore City . . . 


54 


39 


15 






2 




37 


15 










Total Counties . . . 


299 


235 


64 


61 


26 


94 


15 


80 


23 










Allegany 

Anne Arundel 
Baltimore. . . . 
Calvert 


80 
8 
63 


58 
7 
48 


22 
1 
15 


57 


22 


1 
1 




1 

6 
47 


1 

15 










Caroline 


3 


2 


1 






2 


i 














Carroll 


3 


2 


1 

3 




1 




2 












Cecil 


6 


3 




i 

3 




2 












Charles 


4 


3 


1 






1 














Dorchester. . . 
Frederick. . . . 


9 
3 


8 
2 


1 






8 


1 


*2 












Garrett 


1 


1 




1 




















Harford 

Howard 

Kent 


14 

2 
3 


11 

2 
3 


3 




i 


4 
1 




'7 
1 
2 












Montgomery . 


11 


8 


3 






4 




4 


2 










Pr. George's. . 
Queen Anne's 
St. Mary's . . 
Somerset .... 
Talbot 


10 

5 

13 
6 


8 
5 

ii 

6 


2 
2 


2 




4 

11 

6 




5 
1 


2 










Washington . . 
Wicomico. . . . 
Worcester. . . . 


1 
44 
10 


1 

36 
10 


8 


1 




36 
10 

















Maryland State Department of Education 



199 



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200 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE 136 



Cost per Student at Maryland State Teachers Colleges: 1948-1955 



Year 
Ending 


Average 
Enroll- 
ment 


Current Expenses 


Average Annual Cost per 
Student 


Total 


Paid by 
Students 


Paid by 
State 


Total 


In Student 
Fees* 


To 
State 


FROSTBURG 


1946 


91 


$108,882 


$11,281 


$97,601 


$1,197 


$124 


$1,073 


1947 


243 


152,531 


30,820 


121,711 


628 


127 


501 


1948 


225 


210,925 


40,024 


170,901 


937 


178 


759 


1949 


270 


236,332 


54,730 


181,602 


875 


203 


672 


1950 


374 


262,317 


50,021 


212,296 


701 


134 


567 


1951 


339 


316,664 


57,636 


259,028 


934 


170 


764 


1952 


338 


318,342 


42,462 


275,880 


942 


126 


816 


1953 


373 


402,258 


88.372 


313,886 


1,078 


237 


841 


1954 


394 


418,682 


58,716 


359,966 


1,063 


149 


914 


1955 


458 


459,180 


57,667 


401,513 


1,003 


126 


877 



SALISBURY 



1946 


153 


$104,121 


$22,184 


$81,937 


$681 


$145 


$536 


1947 


280 


145.226 


46,960 


98,266 1 


519 


168 


351 


1948 


273 


191,221 


64,408 


126,813 1 


700 


236 


464 


1949 


258 


231,054 


54,557 


176,497 


895 


211 


684 


1950 


286 


270,107 


55,342 


214,765 


944 


194 


750 


1951 


200 


268,942 


38,999 


229,943 1 


1,345 


195 


1,150 


1952 


174 


282,935 


22,765 


260,170 I 


1,626 


131 


1,495 


1953 


234 


349,424 


54,129 


295,295 


1,493 


231 


1,262 


1954 


250 


343,124 


41,983 


301,141 


1,372 


168 


1,204 


1955 


338 


386,826 


64,918 


321,908 


1,144 


192 


952 



TOWSON 



1946 


264 


$250,048 


$32,550 


$217,498 


$947 


$123 


$824 


1947 


454 


325,098 


64,302 


260,796 


716 


142 


574 


1948 


625 


430,679 


102,645 


328,034 


689 


164 


525 


1949 


750 


469,299 


84,996 


384,303 


626 


113 


513 


1950 


885 


599,879 


93,495 


506,384 


678 


106 


572 


1951 


879 


633,145 


107,164 


525,981 


720 


122 


598 


1952 


855 


757,257 


92,816 


664,441 


886 


109 


777 


1953 


851 


842,915 


121,076 


721,839 


990 


142 


848 


1954 


893 


962,662 


135,050 


827,612 


1,078 


151 


927 


1955 


1,033 


1,024,421 


173,733 


850,688 


992 


168 


824 



BOWIE 



1946 


121 


$93,004 


$17,055 


$75,949 


$769 


$141 


$628 


1947 


124 


108,230 


17,809 


90,421 


873 


144 


729 


1948 


152 


163,153 


22,972 


140,181 


1,073 


151 


922 


1949 


157 


172,046 


28,341 


143,705 


1,096 


181 


915 


1950 


207 


212,373 


26,353 


186,020 


1,026 


127 


899 


1951 


218 


226,790 


33,750 


193,040 


1,040 


155 


885 


1952 


262 


261,264 


32,810 


228,454 


997 


125 


872 


1953 


331 


316,737 


59,506 


257,231 


957 


180 


777 


1954 


343 


351,712 


72,599 


279,113 


1,025 


211 


814 


1955 


338 


363,046 


75,092 


287,954 


1,074 


222 


852 



COPPIN 



1952 
1953 
L954 
1955 



177 


$59,415 


197 


126,542 


236 


159,193 


267 


172,823 



$5,390 
8,103 
9.625 



$59,415 
121,152 
151,090 
163,198 



$836 
642 
674 
647 



$27 
34 
36 



615 
640 
611 



Maryland State Department of Education 201 



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202 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 139 — Maryland Teachers' Retirement System: Members in Active 
Service and Their Contributions: Year Ending July 31, 1955 



f^dl TXT TV no TxiCTTTTTTTr^W 


Amount Contributed Year 

FnHino- Tnlv 31 19^ 


Members in Active Service 

M av 01 iqr;t; 
ividy oXf ljoo 


C^T) A \JT\ Tl^lT A T 


*o 1 7Q One 40 


10 702 


Total Counties 


$2,066,745.59 


10,282 


A „ 


193 978 fi3 

1 — 0,£ 1 O.UO 


631 


Anne Arundel 


156,081.72 


771 


Baltimore 


385,234.55 


1,860 


Calvert 


17,216.88 


97 




31,943.02 


163 


Carroll 


52,674.00 


287 


Cecil 


48 ^94 fi9 


242 


Charles 


35,117.73 


187 


Dorchester 


37695. 44 


196 




68*757.36 


349 


Garrett 


30,034.37 


167 


Harford 


82,084.21 


435 




42,093.35 


207 


Kent 


23 882.25 


127 




O0£,O0O. J.O 


1 546 


Prince George's 


262,930.33 


1,390 


Queen Anne's 


27,183.38 


141 




18,874.95 


101 




99 ddd. R9 


158 




91 0^9 3fl 

o±,uoJ7.ou 


148 




1 99 0^4 98 


601 




O^, 1 l-O.O 1 


294 


Worcester 


35,185.81 


184 


Total Schooi-s and Departments 


$112,459.81 


420 


Teachers Colleges 


$54,635.62 


185 




6,030.12 


24 




4,592.60 


14 




10,402.33 


34 


Salisbury 


8,227.33 


29 




25,383.24 


84 


Departments 


$36,479.06 


142 


County Libraries 


11,720.77 


69 




24,514.09 


72 


Retirement 


244.20 


1 


Other Schools 


$21,345.13 


93 


Barrett School for Girls 


1,015.00 


5 


Md. School for (he Deaf 


5,799.64 


26 


Md. Training School for Boys 


7,420.26 


32 




1,137.66 


5 




2,696.48 


11 


St. Mary's Seminary and Junior College 


3,276.09 


14 



Maryland State Department of Education 



203 



TABLE 140 — Parent-Teacher Associations: Maryland County Schools: 
Years Ending June 30, 1954 and 1955 



County 


White Schools 


1 


Colored 


Schools 




Number 


Per Cent 


Number 


Per Cent 


1954 


1955 


1954 


1955 


1954 


1955 


1954 


1955 


Total Counties 


555 


582 


95 


5 


96 


8 


179 


170 


96 


2 


98.3 


Allegany 


28 


27 


87 


5 


84 


4 


2 


2 


100 





100.0 


Anne Arundel 


42 


44 


100 





100 





21 


20 


100 





100.0 


Baltimore 


60 


64 


100 





100 





14 


13 


100 





100.0 


Calvert 


7 


8 


100 





100 





9 


9 


100 





100.0 


Caroline 


9 


9 


100 





100 





4 


4 


100 





100.0 


Carroll 


17 


18 


94 


4 


94 


7 


2 


2 


100 





100.0 


Cecil 


16 


17 


76 


2 


80 


9 


3 


3 


100 





100.0 


Charles 


7 


7 


100 





100 





13 


12 


100 





100.0 


Dorchester 


17 


17 


85 





80 


9 


6 


9 


60 





90.0 


Frederick 


26 


28 


86 


7 


94 


3 


7 


7 


87 


5 


87.5 


Garrett 


26 


25 


83 


9 


100 















Harford 


22 


21 


100 





100 





2 


2 


100 





woo 


Howard 


10 


11 


100 





100 





8 


5 


100 





100.0 


Kent 


10 


10 


100 





100 





6 


6 


100 





100.0 


Montgomery 


73 


81 


100 





100 





10 


10 


100 





100.0 


Prince George's 


70 


78 


98 


6 


100 





21 


21 


100 





100.0 


Queen Anne's 


14 


12 


100 





100 





9 


3 


100 





100.0 


St. Marv's 


10 


12 


90 


9 


85 


7 


7 


6 


100 





85.7 


Somerset 


12 


12 


100 





100 





9 


10 


100 





100.0 


Talbot 


11 


10 


100 





100 





8 


10 


80 





100.0 


Washington 


42 


43 


95 


5 


97 


7 


1 


1 


100 





100.0 


Wicomico 


16 


17 


100 





100 





10 


9 


100 





100.0 


Worcester 


10 


11 


100 





100 





7 


6 


100 





100.0 



204 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 141— Enrollment in Baltimore City Summer Schools: 1945- 1954 ; and bv 

Type of School : 1954 









Net Roll at End of Term 




Year 


Number 


Total 








XT 

Number 




of 


Enroll- 




Taking 


of 


Type of School 


Schools 


ment 


Total 






Principals 










Review 


Advance 


and 
Teachers 










Work 


Work 




All Schools 














1945 


13 


6,465 


5,750 


5,052 


698 


123 


1946 


12 


6,851 


6.159 


5,428 


731 


122 


1947 


12 


6,565 


6,039 


5,287 


752 


146 


1948* 


5 


3,686 


3,421 


2,895 


526 


86 


1949 


5 


4,222 


3,865 


3,275 


590 


92 


1950 


5 


4,010 


3,628 


2,990 


638 


78 


1951 


5 


4,145 


3,710 


3,258 


452 


80 


1952 


5 


4,234 


3,945 


3,564 


381 


80 


1953 


5 


4,726 


4,373 


3,954 


419 


80 


1954 


5 


5,454 


4,990 


4,586 


404 


84 


Secondary 


3 


5,088 


4,645 


4,586 


59 


68 


Senior 


2 


2,558 


2,379 


2,320 


59 


37 


Junior 




2,530 


2,266 


2,266 




31 


Demonstration 


2 


366 


345 




345 


16 



No elementary review school beginning 1948. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



205 



TABLE 142 

High School Equivalence Examinations in Maryland: 1946-55 



Year Ending 
June 30 


Applicants Tested 


Number of 
Certificates IssuedJ 


Nonhigh School 
Graduates* 


High School 
Graduates! 


1946 


1,128 




477 


1947 


2,411 


148 


1,169 


1948 


1,469 


129 


al,525 


1949 


1,129 


156 


61,288 


1950 


1,081 


81 


cl,079 


1951 


912 


52 


</939 


1952 


779 


51 


el, 107 


1953 


1,005 


59 


/1,313 


1954 


1,377 


65 


<7l,724 


1955 


1,487 


37 


fcl,599 



* Includes re-tests. 

t High school graduates who took tests at request of colleges. 

X Includes certificates issued to USAFI applicants who took tests in armed services, as follows: 
a, 433; b, 457; c, 332; d, 291; e, 580; f, 613; g, 837; h, 717. 



206 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE 143 — Vocational Rehabilitation Services Rendered: State of Maryland: 



Year Ending June 30, 1955 



County 


Total 
N^umber 
Cases 


Reha- 

Villi,*! 


Being 
Followed 

nti Tn Vic 


'"Pra in in or 

J. 1 a 1 I 1 1 1 1 g 


Being 
for Jobs 


OUI vc vcu.. 

r%\ i n cf*l pH 
\s \J UIl ad tr^J. 


Other 

QorvipAQ 

Oul V lL-tT3 


Total State 


4,626 


1,075 


58 


344 


910 


1,322 


917 


Baltimore City 


2 276 


424 


21 


174 


426 


705 


526 


Total Counties 


2,350 


651 


37 


170 


484 


617 


391 


Alleganv 


154 


47 




17 


25 


30 


35 


Anne Arundel 


160 


48 


3 


18 


19 


43 


29 


Baltimore 


350 


87 


4 


6 


74 


61 


118 


Calvert 


14 


. 2 




2 


2 


7 




Caroline 


59 


17 


2 


3 


8 


24 


5 


Carroll 


78 


23 




8 


12 


12 


23 


Cecil 


76 


18 


2 


3 


20 


23 


10 


Charles 


32 






5 


7 


9 




Dorchester 


78 


28 


i 


5 


10 


28 


6 


Frederick 


160 


59 


3 


18 


20 


28 


32 


Garrett 


48 


8 




6 


17 


5 


12 


Harford 


70 


23 




4 


5 


22 


16 


Howard 


25 


7 






9 


7 


2 


Kent 


39 


10 


2 


4 


8 


9 


6 


Montgomery. . 


215 


63 


4 


18 


50 


69 


11 


Pr. George's. . 


276 


70 


3 


12 


91 


81 


19 


Queen Anne's. 


37 


11 


2 


4 


8 


9 


3 


St. Mary's. . . . 


34 


8 ■ 




3 


8 


13 


2 


Somerset 


34 


3 


3 




13 


10 


5 


Talbot 


35 


10 


1 


i 


3 


12 


8 


Washington . . 


174 


47 


1 


17 


37 


49 


23 


Wicomico .... 


158 


40 


6 


14 


29 


51 


18 


Worcester 


44 


11 




2 


9 


15 


7 



PERSONAL CHARACTERISTICS OF CLIENTS SERVED 



Characteristic 



Total Number. . . 
Age 

Under 21 

21-30 

31-40. 

41-50 

Over 50 

Education 

None 

1-3 

4-6 

7-9 

10-12 

H. S. Graduate 

13-14 

15-16 

College 

Unknown 

Dependents 



1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

Over 5 



Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Otherf 


Characteristic 


Total 


Reha- 
bilitated* 


Otherf 


4,626 


1,075 


3,551 


Race 








White 


3,319 


817 


2,502 










1,304 


257 


1,047 


1,143 


191 


952 


Other 


3 


1 


2 


915 


242 


673 










999 


239 


760 


Sex 








892 


215 


677 




3,067 


715 


2,352 


677 


188 


489 


Female 


1,559 


360 


1,199 








Marital Status 








88 


20 


68 


Single 


2,113 


403 


1,710 


298 


62 


236 




1,665 


456 


1,209 


840 


175 


665 


Other 


848 


216 


632 


1,722 


394 


1,328 










936 


218 


718 


Employment History 








465 


143 


322 


(at Survey) 








105 


31 


74 


Employed 


318 


158 


160 


71 


14 


57 


Unemploved 


4,308 


917 


3,391 


24 


7 


17 


Never Worked 




140 


686 


77 


11 


66 


Worked at 














Some Time . 




777 


2,705 


2,817 
668 


599 


2,218 


Number on Welfare 


647 


103 


544 


180 


488 


(at Survey) 








406 


99 


307 










288 


79 


209 










192 


48 


144 










97 


27 


70 










158 


43 


115 











* Clients who were rehabilitated into employment during year (1,075). 
I Clients who were still receiving service at end of year (3,551). 



Maryland State Department of Education 207 



TABLE 144 — Cost of Vocational Rehabilitation Case Services Rendered: State 
of Maryland: Year Ending June 30, 1955 





Total 


Number of 


Average 


Type of Service 


Expenditure 


Clients 


Cost 




Total Expenditure 


*$301,600.27 







Examinations 










14,277.20 


1,387 


$10.29 




501.46 


44 


11.39 


Surgery and Treatment 








Medical 


1,224.89 


65 


18.84 


Psychiatric 


1,960.00 


33 


59.39 


Surgical 


13,957.00 


197 


70.84 


Dental 


3,750.32 


47 


79.79 


Physical and occupational therapy 


11,887.03 


84 


141.51 


Prosthetic Appliances 










16,355.95 


104 


157.26 


Braces 


4,415.87 


83 


53 20 




6,541.50 


76 


86.07 


Glasses and artificial eyes 


1,496.61 


95 


15.75 


Surgical appliances 


1,848.00 


81 


22.81 


Wheel Chairs, hand and power operated 


1,078.15 


34 


31.71 


Hospitalization and Convalescent Care 










34,635.76 


157 


220.61 


Convalescent home care 


1,677.21 


20 


83.86 


Nursing care in client's residence 








Training and Training Materials 








Personal adjustment training 


6,185.72 


116 


53.32 




80|410!00 


486 


165.45 


Employ rnGnt 


1 699.77 


47 


36 16 




3485^90 


79 


40^32 


Tutorial 


1,128.00 


44 


25.63 






334 


23 66 


Maintenance and Transportation 








Maintenance 








Training 


59,456.45 


352 


168.91 


Medical or physical restoration 


8,087.50 


107 


75.58 












862.50 


59 


14.61 


Transportation 










11,798.45 


416 


28.36 


Medical or physical restoration 


1,778.92 


229 


7.76 


Occupational Tools and Equipment (Clients) 


2,974.24 


47 


63.28 


Miscellaneous (Other) 


177.39 


3 


59.13 




344.40 







Net cash expenditures and encumbrances charged against Case Services for fiscal year 1955. 



208 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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209 



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Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 
Maryland State Department of Education: Headquarters and Vocational 
Rehabilitation: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Source or Purpose 


Headquarters 


Vocational 
Rehabilitation 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1953-54 


$37,779.01 
628,171.00 


$ 3,884.32 
325,658.00 


Budget Credits 


32,420.38 
7,631.71 
36,755.00 


305,044.75 
3,296.19 
*(34,545.00) 


Net Transfers 


Total Funds Available 


$742,757.10 


$603,338.26 


DISBURSEMENTS 




Departmental and 
Financial 
Administration 

$151,760.69 
4 516.19 
5',080!84 
5,445.00 
2,591.08 
17,401.35 
3,282.04 
165.00 
568.55 
33,759.65 


Administration 

$ 42,322.05 
18.00 
420!83 
2,250.34 
454.60 
39.50 
872.08 
120.82 
68.50 
1,895.00 


Travel 




Total 


$224,570.39 

Supervisory and 
Consultative 
Services 

$204,319.66 
16',418'.87 
4,660.22 
15,593.52 
5,635.27 
8,723.04 
2,828.58 
887.50 
404.98 


$48,461.72 

Placement and 
Guidance 

$185,183 34 
6',878.94 
4,955.29 
14,372.08 

597.15 
1,043.62 
292.50 
532.16 
13,805.00 






Equipment — Replacement 

Fixed Charges 


Total 




$259,471.64 

Administrative 
Services 

$ 92,854.68 
14,125.35 
3,511.42 
5,841.69 
494.81 

2,339.87 
174.00 
431.90 


$227,660.08 

Case 
Services 












Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 








Equipment — Replacement 

Equipment — Additional 




Total 


$305,470.53 


$122,027.02 

Library Extension 
Services 

$53,377.20 
243.95 
979.62 
412.96 
248.45 

2,215.30 
959.76 

2,744.93 
17,410.72 

1,411.00 

$80,003.89 

$686,072.94 
366.40 


$305,470.53 








Travel 




Motor Vehicle Operation and Maintenance 

Cont ractual Services 








Equipment — Additional 








Total 




Total Program Expenditure! 

Other Expenditures 


$581,592.33 


Unexpended Balance Returned to Treasury 




$«K6.43!».:M 
$22,192.02 
$34,125.74 


$581,592.33 
$14,720.03 
$7,025.90 



* Denote! red figure. 



Maryland State Department of Education 



213 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT 



Maryland State Teachers Colleges: Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1955 



Source or Purpose 


TOWSON 


Frostburg 


Salisbury 


Bowie 


Coppin 


RECEIPTS 


Balance Forwarded from 1953-54 


$38,050.07 
850,688.00 
176,636.46 
61,020.30 


$6,823.31 
372,115.00 
61,623.95 
31,942.51 
29,400.00 


$9,714.57 
322,142.00 
78,300.40 
15,603.58 


$7,941.68 
297,134.00 
76,705.05 
10,758.02 


$3,260.82 
163,645.00 
10,050.74 
210.68 


General Fund Appropriation 


Special Fund Receipts 


Budget Credits 


Net Transfers 


Total Funds Available 










$1,126,394.83 


$501,904.77 


$425,760.55 


$392,538.75 


$177,167.24 




DISBURSEMENTS 


General Administration 

Salaries and Wages 


$104,705.34 
1,775.97 
4,922.33 
1,139.56 

271.49 
3,242.19 
5,751.82 
1,191.97 
1,421.48 
1,615.59 


$41,039.13 
1,078.45 
1,346.16 
487.57 

703.35 
4,272.65 
1,910.76 

257.50 

760.59 


$42,279.05 
873.45 
1,641.51 
411.85 

278.94 
1,399.05 

990.45 
2,196.00 


$42,713.79 
1,730.00 
1,187.70 
360.48 

393.67 
811.54 
1,656.58 


$27,755.87 
2,011.39 
1,004.68 
199.90 

548.94 
1,103.58 
843.90 


Technical and Special Fees 




Travel 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 










745.75 
535.93 


600.43 
851.69 


Fixed Charges 


722.62 


Total 


$126,037.74 

$443,940.19 
26,175.99 
1.480.36 
2,380.03 

2,156.53 
1,849.96 
6,424.20 
7,100.99 
16,309.47 
124.00 


$51,856.16 

$203,047.27 
3,195.98 
513.35 
888.67 

775.49 
602.88 
4,927.40 
1,798.43 
9,416.30 


$50,792.92 

$157,379.31 
1,690.20 
278.11 
713.19 

1,474.42 
166.83 

5,026.46 
943.11 

8,395.89 


$50,135.44 

$118,504.03 
2,764.16 
122.00 
368.34 

2,063.37 
244.21 
3,209.49 
2,120.47 
6,418.27 


$34,920.38 

$81,362.00 
1,795.50 
103.35 
600.00 


Instruction 

Salaries and Wages 


Technical and Special Fees 


Communication 


Travel 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 


Contractual Services 


400.00 
2,584.12 


Supplies and Materials 


Equipment — Replacement 


Equipment — Additional 


8,110.16 


Fixed Charges 


Total 








$507,941.72 

$71,670.06 
1,765.80 
86,296.87 

96.68 
1,486.93 
5,215.91 
1,019.00 
1,065.20 


$225,165.77 

$31 837 91 
4,576.63 
37,942.48 


$176,067.52 

$23,863 84 
1,290^00 
39,954.95 


$135,814.34 

$28,747.89 
794.25 
52,273.98 


$94,955.13 

$8,535.97 
746.13 
8,477.45 

796.64 
180.39 


Dietary Services 

Salaries and Wages 


Technical and Special Fees 


Food 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 


Contractual Services 




873.90 
1,614.22 
84.35 
415.89 


260.90 
1,515.71 


Supplies and Materials 


405.61 


Equipment — Replacement 


Equipment — Additional 


460.10 




368.50 


Fixed Charges 




Total 












$168,616.45 

$138,877.16 
4,457.55 
16,642.09 

723.16 
50,485.21 
20,703.62 
1,247.14 
11,862.03 
38.39 


$75,222.73 

$60,451.39 
235.75 
7,592.10 


$68,097.15 
$45,173.93 


$83,592.73 

$61,831.38 
200.00 
14,590.06 

1,469.24 
15,837.45 
5,667.28 
1,641.50 
1,030.18 


$19,105.08 

$15,540.85 
p 949.65 
2,545.34 

94.95 
3,865.28 
1,473.20 


Plant Operation and Maintenance 
Salaries and Wages 


Technical and Special Fees 


Fuel 


8,541.30 

587.51 
27,872.29 
5,949.78 
1,227.80 
5,346.32 


Motor Vehicle Operation and 

Maintenance 


Contractual Services 


18,703.96 
4,964.02 


Supplies and Materials 


Equipment — Replacement 


Equipment — Additional 


3,259.84 


1,904.32 


Fixed Charges 


Land and Structures 


18,180.20 








Total 










$245,036.35 

$1,047,632.26 
3,330.50 
27,162.50 
14,098.50 
2,705.00 
832.00 


$113,387.26 

$465,631.92 
5,407.75 
7,125.00 
4,750.00 
1,230.00 
10,579.24 


$94,698.93 

$389,656.52 
736.00 
6,026.61 
5,248.60 
989.72 
113.59 


$102,267.09 

$371,809.60 
317.35 
3,385.00 
1,696.50 
495.00 
25.75 


$26,373.59 
$175,354.18 


Total Program Expenditures 


Refunds 


Activities Association 




Athletic Association 




Breakage Fee Account 




Other 




Total Disbursements 




$1,095,760.76 
$2,903.58 
$27,730.49 


$494,723.91 
$4,778.72 
$2,402.14 


$402,771.04 
$13,615.86 
$9,373.65 


$377,729.20 
$11,030.61 
$3,778.94 


$175,354.18 
$888.16 
$924.90 


Unexpended Balance Returned 
to Treasury 


Balance, June 30, 1955 





Note: Disbursements for Summer School at Towson and Bowie are included under appropriate items in 
Instruction and Dietary Services. 



214 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



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Maryland State Department of Education 



249 



TABLE XXVII 

State Aid for Minimum Program*: Maryland Public Schools — Grades 1 to 12: 1954-55 



County 


Cost of Minimum Program 


State Aid for Minimum 
Program 


Total 


Minimum 
Salaries 


Other 
Current Ex- 
pense Costs 


Transporta- 
tion 


Amount 


Per Cent 


Total State 


$66,531,390.10 


$48,839,062.68 


$12,209,765.65 


$5,482,561 


77 


$29,100,452.74 


43 


7 


• 

Baltimore Cityj . . 


18,098,000.00 


14,478,400.00 


3,619,600.00 






4,591,880.00 


25 


4 


Total Counties . . . 


48,433,390.10 


34,360,662.68 


8,590,165.65 


5,482,561 


77 


24,508,572.74 


50 


6 


Allegany 


2,811,984.79 


2,026,483.65 


506,620.91 


278,880 


23 


1,721,123.01 


61 


2 


Anne Arundel . . 


4,002,944.64 


2,895,697.00 


723,924.25 


383,323 


39 


2,518,570.31 


62 


9 


Baltimore 


7,926,427.13 


5,722,436.60 


1,430,609.15 


773,381 


38 


2,045,229.28 


25 


8 


Calvert 


593,424.47 


368,494.80 


92,123.70 


132,805 


97 


476,990.51 


80 


4 


Caroline 


775,321.49 


515,051.50 


128,762.87 


131,507 


12 


574,273.91 


74 


1 


Carroll 


1,507,475.48 


1,057,317.50 


264,329.37 


185,828 


61 


902,251.91 


59 


9 


Cecil 


1,337,447.78 


939,077.00 


234,769.25 


163,601 


53 


808,173.75 


60 


4 


Charles 


1,082,041.91 


719,985.00 


179,996.25 


182,060 


66 


884,614.69 


81 


7 


Dorchester 


1,000,902.08 


661,580.00 


165,395.00 


173,927 


08 


557,186.51 


55 


7 


Frederick 


1,864,898.62 


1,293,605.00 


323,401.25 


247,892 


37 


946,783.15 


50 


8 


Garrett 


969,292.30 


563,490.13 


140,872.53 


264,929 


64 


792,306.83 


81 


7 


Harford 


2,007,463.04 


1,340,920.00 


335,230.00 


331,313 


04 


1,096,810.95 


54 


6 


Howard 


984,221.03 


662,457.40 


165,614.35 


156,149 


28 


689.147.85 


70 





Kent 


574,980.75 


377,055.00 


94,263.75 


103,662 


00 


390,582.93 


67 


9 


Montgomery . . . 


6,515,745.46 


4,879,185.00 


1,219,796.25 


416,764 


21 


1,788,007.71 


27 


4 


Prince George's. 
Queen Anne's . . 


6,648,948.89 


4,977,247.50 


1,244,311.87 


427,389 


52 


3,615,269.89 


54 


4 


658,143.39 


420,595.00 


105,148.75 


132,399 


64 


424,352.15 


64 


5 


St. Mary's 


734,855.74 


459,300.00 


114,825.00 


160,730 


74 


507,930.62 


69 


1 


Somerset 


740,554.74 


496,005.00 


124,001.25 


120,548 


49 


580,292.25 


78 


3 


Talbot 


716,461.52 


490,860.00 


122,715.00 


102,886 


52 


404,952.84 


56 


5 


Washington. . . . 


2,760,308.72 


2,008,210.00 


502,052.50 


250,046 


22 


1,543,569.68 


55 


9 


Wicomico 


1,308,429.63 


895,099.60 


223,774.90 


189,555 


13 


713,586.07 


54 


5 


Worcester 


911,116.50 


590,510.00 


147,627.50 


172,979 


00 


526,565.94 


57 


8 



* The minimum program in calculating State Equalization aid includes the following: (a) total minimum salaries 
of the allowed number of teachers and principals as determined by State law; (b) other current expense including the 
cost of operation and maintenance and the cost of instruction other than the salaries of teachers, principals, and 
supervisors; and (c) the cost of approved transportation to public schools. 

t December, 1954, calculation. 



!50 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



J! 



11 



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251 



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252 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

£ : : : :§ S :2 : : : :3 



£3 : : S 



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S3* 



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£88*882 : :s 1"2 S ~ 2~~ : : : ~ 



= 8^5 :3 8332538 : :g pi 
SS2S : 5 §£8*885 : :§ SSS 



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££2g :S 



SSSSSZZ : :g £S£ §$SSS :S2 ££2 : : :S 



gSSSSSS :gSS $S833S8S 388 :SS8 



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Maryland State Department of Education 253 



2 




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05 




: - - : : • 1SS : : : 


: : : 








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giS=83»S :::::: « : IfSSSSg^ : : : 


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S2^ = 2 




£~S2s 


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: :2§ : : 




to 






25^2?? 




S2S2S 


H : :2gS2S§ :SSSS"2»» § ' : 5»8<»««BS»2 




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3 MS9 | : :S ttg^ggggSg :g | : :£3 S 839ggggg8gSS38 


|^?S2 


CO 


S53S3 |B.|l8BBB|aSBi83E33 ||||l|isil|2llSiip2 gB8S3 




1,069 
158 
433 
) 160 
318 


liPlSgllJiJIIIlll lliJSSJgllllilSlSpi 5MSB 

2~~ ^ - 2 - 












Kent 

Galena Sr.-Jr 

Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

Garnett Colored Sr.-Jr 


Montgomery 

Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr. . . 

Prince George's 

High Point Sr.-Jr 

Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 


Fairmont Heights Col. Sr.-Jr. . . 
Lincoln Colored Jr 


Queen Anne's 

Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 



254 



Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 







O 


:::::: :::::::: S : :gg Sff : :8S§ : : : : : 


33 


:::::: : : : : : : 3£ :fc gg;;- : : : : : SS? : : : :8 


A 


a 


:::::: £332 : : :~; fegSS SSSSSSS : : : S£ : : : :5S 


pq 


:::::: 5^33 : : : ££«22°° :::::- 22 : : : 


Gen. and 
Jr. Hi R h 


a 




33 


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1 


o 


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33 


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w 


a 






33 






a 


o 




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33 


S2S 


2- 8s«r* :32 3«88 g3M*9S : SSS«« :« 


lrollment by Year and Sex* 


2 


O 




fl : :2 = Sg^g |232S$S : : : :« gS~<* 


33 




2- so^ 00 - :£2 gSSS £3883(98 :■: ::- 8.8.3"" 




o 




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2 


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33 


£££-2- £222- :£2 S323 g£898S8S : : :<* ||22- :g 




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33 


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33 






O 


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33 


2S3?33S RS3 = — S~ SKSS g :i;S$ = $2sS2- | ^S-gS 


?! 




1 ,386 
324 
458 
164 
301 
139 

1,531 
326 
368 
116 
84 
24 
416 
197 

1,542 
766 
292 
484 

6,757 
1,524 
495 
518 
404 
935 
402 
104 
784 
785 
651 
155 

2.921 
688 
132 
152 
81 

1 ,156 
712 






Num- 
ber of 
Teach- 
ers 


r-OOt-OOOO 00 O O 00 OOTfOONOMO^OO o>oe*oooo 

£253*-:$* k22 eo " 5 ~2 = ££2£ SSSSS^SS^SSS 03 Sg^«-Sg 



4 



|I 111 J 



.a 

411 




Maryland State Department of Education 



255 



tw • to 



-r oc -*r to 
O. «- cr. 
tO — 



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■ ,-. ■ - CO < 



oc tp ^ -*< — < . 



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t(NN — CM — CO < 



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O tO 



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CD CO CM ~ CM — h -f CO — 



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a 



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CM 



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— 

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■~ 

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to 

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III 

X EC IS 



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111 



256 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIX— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryland Count 



County 
Name of High School 



1 Allegany 

2 Oldtown Sr.-Jr 

3 Flintstone Sr.-Jr 

4 Fort Hill Sr.-Jr 

5 Allegany Sr.-Jr. 

6 Bruce Sr.-Jr 

7 Valley Sr.-Jr 

8 Mt. Savage Sr.-Jr 

9 Beall Sr.-Jr 

10 Cresaptown Jr 

11 Penn. Ave. Elem.-Jr 

12 Beall Elem.-Jr 

13 Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 

14 Anne Arundel 

15 Annapolis Sr 

16 Glen Burnie Sr 

17 Arundel Sr.-Jr. 

18 Brooklyn Park Sr.-Jr 

19 Southern Sr.-Jr 

20 Annapolis Jr 

21 George Fox Jr 

22 Glen Burnie Jr. 

23 Bates Colored Sr.-Jr 

24 Baltimore 

25 Catonsville Sr 

26 Towson Sr 

27 Dundalk Sr 

28 Kenwood Sr 

29 Milford Mills Sr.-Jr 

30 Franklin Sr.-Jr 

31 Hereford Sr.-Jr 

32 Parkville Sr.-Jr 

33 Sparrows Point Sr.-Jr 

34 Catonsville Jr 

35 Towson Jr 

36 Carroll Manor Jr 

37 North Point Jr 

38 Stemmers Run Jr 

39 Sparrows Point Elem.-Jr. . . 

40 Edgemere Elem.-Jr 

41 Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

42 Carver Colored Sr.-Jr 

43 Sollers Point Colored Sr.-Jr. 

44 Calvert 

45 Calvert County Sr.-Jr. 

46 Beach Jr 

47 Brooks Colored Sr.-Jr 

48 Caroline 

49 Greensboro Sr.-Jr 

50 Caroline Sr.-Jr. 

51 Preston Sr.-Jr 

52 Federalsburg Sr.-Jr 

53 Ridgely Sr.-Jr 

54 Lockerman Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

55 Carroll 

56 Taneytown Sr.-Jr 

57 Sykesville Sr.-Jr 

58 Manchester Sr.-Jr 

50 Westminster Sr.-Jr 

60 Ham i stead Sr.-Jr 

61 New Windsor Sr.-Jr 

62 Elmer Wolfe Sr.-Jr 

63 Mount Airy Sr.-Jr 

'it Charles Carroll Jr 

0S Sandymount Elem.-Jr. 

66 Mechanics ville Elem.-Jr. . . . 

67 Motor, Colored Sr.-Jr 

68 Johnsville Colored Elem.-Jr. 

69 Cecil 

70 r Serilton Sr.-Jr 

71 Chesapeake City Sr.-Jr 

72 Elkton Sr.-Jr 

73 North East Sr.-Jr 

74 Rising Sun Sr.-Jr 

75 Perryville Sr.-Jr 

76 Ken more Jr 

77 Calvert Jr. 

7S Carver Colored Sr.-Jr. 



Total 


























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


Latin 


me 


nt 










Stu 


lies 






mat 


ics 






B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


3,858 


3,646 


417 


330 


3,439 


3,315 


3,257 


3 ,060 


3,190 


2,827 


2,955 


2,473 


247 


34 


105 


112 






105 


111 


105 


104 


99 


112 


104 


107 






124 


110 


33 


26 


91 


84 


91 


84 


107 


96 


83 


79 




• 


1 ,013 


974 






1 ,013 


974 


973 


903 


865 


768 


800 


644 


75 


5 


794 


782 


26 


10 


766 


772 


737 


699 


635 


552 


544 


474 


51 


9 


337 


315 


15 


6 


322 


309 


298 


299 


26C 


230 


281 


193 


21 


3 


385 


390 


140 


148 


245 


242 


196 


187 


308 


293 


280 


258 


32 


3 


264 


212 


47 


31 


217 


181 


187 


162 


204 


163 


172 


136 


23 


3 


494 


457 


25 


1 


469 


456 


459 


436 


396 


323 


368 


312 


45 


6 


108 


97 


44 


33 


64 


64 


64 


64 


108 


97 


108 


97 






76 


71 


76 


71 










76 


71 


76 


71 






99 


73 


11 


4 


88 


69 


88 


69 


88 


69 


88 


69 






59 


53 






59 


53 


59 


53 


44 


53 


51 


33 






4 ,998 


5,100 


3,227 


3 ,058 


1 ,770 


2 ,042 


1 ,605 


1 ,920 


3 ,281 


2 ,997 


4 ,044 


3 8?,d 


69 


8' 


401 


447 




401 


447 


40C 


445 


308 


282 


242 


197 


16 


1 


559 


600 






559 


600 


493 


511 


437 


330 


347 


306 


31 


4 


554 


611 


411 


401 


142 


210 


14C 


203 


337 


340 


497 


505 






573 


623 


458 


411 


115 


212 


115 


212 


371 


389 


376 


384 


16 


2( 


231 


196 






231 


196 


231 


190 


197 


153 


190 


154 






700 


717 


700 


717 










355 


366 


700 


717 






528 


463 


528 


463 










327 


289 


327 


28S 






525 


443 


525 


443 




• • 


• • 


• ■ 


525 


443 


525 


443 


• • 




927 


1 ,000 


605 


623 


322 


377 


226 


359 


424 


405 


840 


834 




; e 

K 


11456 


11203 


7,626 


7 ,109 

• • 


3 ,815 


4 ,088 


3 ,761 


4 ,052 


10406 


9 ,414 


9 ,855 


8 ,312 


339 


43^ 


553 


558 


553 


557 


547 


557 


493 


359 


270 


214 


51 




822 


978 


280 


273 


539 


705 


496 


668 


593 


585 


612 


565 


8C 


19/1 

134 


500 


511 






499 


511 


498 


508 


355 


270 


283 


101 


35 


If 
41 


763 


817 






763 


817 


753 


816 


527 


433 


557 


189 


81 




904 


937 


587 


597 


311 


339 


316 


340 


834 


813 


749 


708 


42 


33' 


403 


453 


262 


283 


136 


166 


137 


170 


365 


368 


332 


324 


25 


14 


465 


447 


295 


285 


170 


162 


170 


162 


437 


393 


365 


331 






1,270 


1,140 


916 


810 


354 


330 


354 


330 


1 ,228 


1,037 


1,171 


927 


25 


38F 


513 


515 


276 


281 


237 


234 


237 


234 


393 


368 


389 


291 






999 


918 


999 


918 










999 


918 


999 


918 






635 


594 


635 


594 










635 


594 


635 


594 






88 


84 


88 


84 










88 


84 


88 


84 




V. | 


1,080 


938 


1 ,080 


938 










1 ,080 


938 


1 ,080 


938 






1 ,497 


1 ,411 


1 ,497 


1 ,411 










1 ,497 


1 ,411 


1 ,497 


1 ,411 






77 


59 


77 


59 










77 


59 


77 


59 






89 


81 


89 


81 






• ■ 




89 


81 


89 


81 






110 


117 


72 


71 


38 


46 


38 


46 


110 


115 


104 


95 






223 


228 


150 


147 


73 


81 


73 


81 


200 


210 


157 


174 






465 


417 


323 


277 


142 


140 


142 


140 


406 


378 


401 


308 






617 


593 


162 


163 


455 


430 


437 


423 


465 


422 


495 


451 


31 


34 


301 


263 


54 


55 


247 


208 


245 


204 


203 


135 


235 


180 


31 


34 I 


57 


56 


38 


26 


19 


30 


19 


30 


19 


30 


57 


56 






259 


274 


70 


82 


189 


192 


173 


189 


243 


257 


203 


215 






833 


808 


328 


368 


503 


439 


485 


438 


728 


664 


677 


624 


27 


98 


150 


176 


64 


65 


86 


110 


86 


109 


142 


148 


1 10 


125 


1 


n 


193 


184 


49 


70 


144 


114 


144 


114 


175 


148 


131 


124 


4 


1 1 


82 


70 


30 


28 


52 


42 


47 


42 


72 


57 


76 


60 


1 1 





171 


147 


95 


89 


76 


58 


76 


58 


140 


121 


147 


114 


1 1 


9 P 


55 


52 


29 


25 


26 


27 


26 


27 


55 


52 


55 


52 






182 


179 


61 


91 


1 19 


88 


106 


88 


144 


138 


158 


149 






1 ,935 


1 ,960 






1 ,935 


1 ,959 


1 ,929 


1 ,947 


1 ,750 


1 ,685 


1 ,549 


1 ,427 


38 


tiCi 
Ov 

11 


177 


188 






177 


188 


177 


187 


155 


155 


157 


153 


8 


208 


224 






208 


224 


208 


224 


188 


183 


175 


158 




" 


192 


206 






192 


206 


192 


206 


183 


178 


151 


148 


• • 




586 


566 






586 


565 


585 


566 


501 


460 


438 


383 


30 


ts 
•lo 


125 


129 






125 


129 


125 


117 


119 


107 


112 


90 




• ' f! 


108 


149 






108 


149 


108 


149 


104 


136 


85 


108 






111 


115 






111 


1 15 


111 


1 15 


92 


96 


82 


73 




■ • | 


217 


184 






217 


184 


212 


184 


197 


171 


153 


136 






63 


43 






63 


43 


63 


43 


63 


43 


63 


43 






20 


23 






20 


23 


20 


23 


20 


23 


20 


23 






27 


18 






27 


18 


27 


18 


27 


18 


27 


18 






94 


104 






94 


104 


94 


104 


94 


104 


79 


83 








11 






7 


11 




11 




11 




11 






1 ,444 


1 ,483 


506 


514 


938 


969 


931 


955 


1 ,310 


1 ,225 


1 ,233 


1 ,208 


28 


23 


99 


84 


51 


33 


48 


51 


46 


51 


99 


70 


99 


84 






93 


78 






93 


78 


93 


78 


59 


46 


74 


61 






406 


380 


159 


175 


247 


205 


247 


203 


345 


311 


322 


273 


28 


23 


264 


286 


128 


115 


136 


171 


136 


170 


255 


229 


208 


187 






229 


294 


95 


116 


134 


178 


134 


176 


208 


238 


199 


273 






176 


184 






176 


184 


176 


184 


173 


163 


159 


155 






35 


29 


22 


21 


13 


8 


13 


8 


35 


29 


35 


29 






39 


45 


28 


30 


11 


15 


11 


15 


39 


46 


39 


45 






103 


103 


23 


24 


80 


79 


75 


70 


97 


94 


98 


101 







Maryland State Department of Education 257 



Public High School : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



French 




Ag 

cull 


ri- 
me 


Industrial 


nome 
Econom 


cs 



Voc. 




Physical 
Education 


Music 


A .4- A -tn 






Gen. 


Voc. 


Arts 


tt 
Edu. 


Ge 
B 


n. 


Sub 


ects 


and 


Crafts 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


G 


f 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




101 




62 


72 


5; 


5-1 


2 ,014 




16c 




1 ,420 


48s 


727 


1 ,174 


2 ,56£ 


2 ,211 


2 ,443 


2 ,438 


1 ,312 


1 ,213 


■ 








58 


■ ■ 


17 








36 


51 






10£ 


105 


71 


95 


47 


40 


■ 










54 


51 








46 


in 

4U 






9£ 


8£ 


82 


102 






4 


■ ■ 


27 


2C 






515 




63 




38-1 


OR 

yo 


135 


300 


63( 


555 


645 


64( 


34< 


342 


5 li 


15 


35 


53 






415 








311 


35 


217 


264 


552 


435 


49( 


43-^ 


293 


250 


6 11 


11 










18C 








107 


75 


5S 


111 


1 8C 


174 


186 


174 






i u 


36 










262 








131 


45 


13£ 


185 


265 


263 


231 


28( 


187 


198 


8 












194 




• • 




103 


2fi 


4( 


56 


23E 


150 


13-1 


122 


16( 


115 


0i 21 


on 

39 










242 




76 




184 


103 


137 


258 


195 


184 


277 


304 


177 


195 


1 












108 








97 








108 


97 


108 


97 






K 




























76 


71 


76 


71 




• • 














■ • 










■ * 






9S 


73 


9£ 


73 


9£ 


73 


K 












27 




24 




21 


1c 






8 


11 


44 


42 






4 254 


334 


36 


142 


00 


77 
/ / 


3 ,oo.: 


25 


362 




3 ,418 


189 


292 


1 ,120 


4 ,o/s 


4 ,098 


3 ,37S 


3 ,718 


2 ,971 


2 ,648 
64 


5 45 


64 


16 


52 






245 


■ ■ 






135 




73 


364 


315 


239 


9C 


161 


33 


6 42 


59 










251 


S 


194 




165 




87 


293 


387 


156 


87 


343 


50 


68 


2fi 


30 








90 
OO 


441 


■ • 






451 




44 


123 


K99 
OOZ 


570 


385 


390 


357 


368 


8 22 


21 








' " 


541 


16 






488 




20 


149 


523 


544 


489 


511 


454 


416 




20 








39 


132 








120 




31 


63 


205 


153 


115 


124 


23 


12 


9 64 


87 










70C 








717 








698 


714 


552 


579 


602 


636 














525 








463 








K9G 
OZo 


463 


435 


417 


459 


385 


2 


■ ■ 


• ■ 


• • 


■ ■ 




525 








443 




■ • 




525 


440 


525 


443 


525 


443 


3 36 


53 


20 


90 


o5 




291 




16S 




436 


1 CO 

lsy 


37 


128 


666 


819 


698 


750 


468 


256 


d 9QS. 

i oyo 


4/0 


ouy 


300 


44 


99 


a OCR 
U ,800 


10 


26C 


116 


5 .Slid 


97 
it 


937 


2 ,62/ 


1 1 9n i 

1 loul 


1 lUlu 


8 ,160 


7 ,955 


7 ,642 


/ ,105 


3 41 


99 
oZ 


4K 
40 


46 






392 


4 


51 


• ■ 


203 




219 


372 


OoZ 


son 

OZU 


102 


167 


79 


72 


R R4 


120 


1 1 9 
1 10 


162 






459 





78 


12 


559 




88 


305 


799 


936 


357 


382 


308 


346 


7 09 
f yZ 


41 










949 
Z4o 




22 


76 


1 99 
IZo 




121 


382 


468 


490 


36 


78 


50 


38 


8 44 


47 


SO 


„• 
65 






400 

4uy 




65 




257 




74 


570 


799 
/ oo 


709 

/ yz 


136 


254 


80 


58 


9 51 


91 


7 


2 






503 






1 4 

14 


443 




142 


215 


904 


937 


652 


682 


622 


636 


D ll 


17 






44 


90 

oy 


215 








231 




48 


127 


400 


439 


116 


133 


172 


220 


1 26 


OR 
ZD 








60 


99E 
ZoO 








997 




54 


112 


AR.K 
400 


AA7 
44/ 


314 


322 


307 


292 


9 33 


99 
£>Z 


59 


25 






798 






13 


644 




78 


210 


1 ,245 


1,111 


976 


926 


995 


840 


j g 


12 










470 
4/ 








352 




58 


203 


501 


498 


316 


314 


312 


299 


m 












600 








570 








999 


918 


999 


918 


999 


918 














343 








288 








635 


594 


635 


594 


362 


327 














01 








OU 








CQ 
OO 


84 


88 


84 


88 


O 1 

84 














658 








563 








1 ,074 


931 


1 ,080 


938 


1,080 


938 


j 












949 








884 








1 ,497 


1 ,411 


1 ,497 


1 ,41 1 


1,497 


1,411 






























77 


KO 

oy 


77 


59 


77 


59 


1 












• ■ 








• • 








OO 

»y 


81 


89 


81 


89 


81 


10 


94 
04 










1U8 








96 




1 


13 


1 1 n 

1 1U 


117 


105 


102 


72 


71 














161 




■ ■ 




154 




46 


63 


223 


228 


200 


199 


186 


180 


15 


23 










263 


2 


44 


1 


206 


97 
ill 


8 


55 


465 


417 


385 


311 


267 


235 


18 


20 








91 


OOfi 
Z80 








375 


73 
/ o 


107 


144 


482 


A1 A 

4/4 


320 


319 


178 


56 


13 


Q 

y 








oo 


211 








187 




84 


102 


207 


194 


120 


102 








■ ■ 










• ■ 








• ■ 




■ ■ 


• 


57 


56 


■ • 


• • 


57 


56 




1 1 








53 


75 








188 


73 


23 


42 


218 


224 


200 


217 


121 




23 


26 






is 


118 


Kin 

04» 








526 


AO 
4Z 


152 


221 


769 


75/ 


513 


584 


51 


54 




10 










145 








1 12 




47 


53 


132 


174 


109 


175 






1 a 
lo 


1 1 








36 


133 








133 




35 


59 


168 


144 


107 


111 


• - 














90 


10 








OU 






■ 


67 


67 




■ • 


20 


1 n 

1U 














131 








100 




46 


65 


167 


144 


122 


120 














13 




97 








52 








55 


51 


■ ■ 


• • 




• ■ 












53 


93 








69 


AO 
4Z 


24 


44 


180 


177 


175 


1/8 


31 


44 


94 


101 








75 


1 ,584 




31 


43 


1 ,394 


128 


401 


606 


1,759 


1,775 


1,610 


1,750 


• 

56 


84 












18 


171 








164 




43 


56 


172 


180 


143 


158 






10 

iy 


20 










175 








176 




35 


70 


203 


214 


186 


192 






JO 


10 










157 








143 




38 


72 


189 


202 


143 


153 






34 

04 


9R 

00 










454 




31 


14 


350 


99 


135 


187 


457 


431 


452 


521 


22 


55 


1R 
10 


1 9 
1Z 










74 






29 


72 


47 


26 


28 


124 


129 


98 


109 








a 
8 










108 








123 




27 


41 


108 


147 


95 


136 








• • 








99 


92 








97 




28 


50 


111 


111 


98 


113 






fi 


9 








94 
04 


176 








137 


91 
Zl 


39 


56 


213 


180 


184 


169 


















63 








43 








61 


43 


63 


43 






;; 












20 








23 








20 


23 


20 


23 






































27 


18 


27 


18 














94 








66 


oo 

38 


30 


46 


94 


104 


94 


104 


































7 


11 


7 


11 


7 


11 


5 


12 


67 


62 




£9 
OZ 


921 


114 




12 


1,018 


31 


212 


408 


1,202 


1 ,038 


926 


1 ,089 


118 


20 




4 










93 








71 




5 


18 


98 


70 


84 


90 


















86 








78 




9 


17 


84 


15 


41 


35 










29 


34 






215 








261 




94 


160 


329 


267 


253 


272 


118 


20 






19 


10 






70 


62 






157 




64 


105 


178 


184 


222 


230 










19 


18 




52 


136 


52 




12 


175 




12 


59 


208 


207 


122 


230 








8 










151 








139 




21 


39 


128 


118 


115 


125 


















35 








29 








35 


29 


12 


17 


















39 








45 








39 


45 


39 


45 


















96 








63 


3i 


7 


io 


103 


103 


38 


45 







258 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 

TABLE XXIX- Continued- Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Marylai 



Total 



County 
Name of High school 



1 Charles 

2 La Plata Sr.-Jr. 

3 Lackey Sr.-Jr 

4 Nanjemoy Jr 

5 Glasva Jr 

6 Hughesville Jr 

7 Bel Alton Colored Sr.-Jr 

8 Pomonkey Colored Sr.-Jr 

9 Dorchester 

10 North Dorchester Sr.-Jr. 

1 1 South Dorchester Sr.-Jr 

12 Cambridge Sr. 

13 Cambridge Jr 

14 Mace's Lane Colored Sr.-Jr 

15 Frederick 

16 Frederick Sr 

17 Middletown Sr.-Jr 

18 Emmitsburg Sr.-Jr 

19 Thurmont Sr.-Jr 

20 Brunswick Sr.-Jr 

21 Walkersville Sr.-Jr 

22 Elm Street Jr 

23 Liberty Jr. 

24 Lincoln Colored Sr.-Jr 

25 Garrett 

26 Northern Garrett County Sr.-Jr. 

27 Southern Garrett County Sr.-Jr. . 

28 Harford 

29 Aberdeen Sr.-Jr 

30 Bel Air Sr.-Jr 

31 North Harford Sr.-Jr 

32 Havre de Grace Sr.-Jr 

33 Edgewood Jr 

34 Central Colored Sr.-Jr 

35 Havre de Grace Colored Sr.-Jr. . . 

36 Howard 

37 Howard County Sr.-Jr 

38 Lisbon Sr.-Jr 

39 Elkridge Jr 

40 Ellicott City Jr 

41 Clarksville Jr 

42 Harriet Tubman Colored Sr.-Jr. . 

43 Kent 

44 Galena Sr.-Jr 

45 Chestertown Sr.-Jr 

46 Rock Hall Sr.-Jr 

47 Garnett Colored Sr.-Jr 

48 Montgomery 

49 Bethesda-Chevy Chase Sr 

50 Montgomery Blair Sr 

51 Poolesville Sr.-Jr 

52 Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr 

53 Sherwood Sr.-Jr 

54 Gaithersburg Sr.-Jr. 

55 Damascus Sr.-Jr 

56 Wheaton Sr.-Jr 

57 Rockville Elem.-Jr. 

58 Inland Jr. 

59 W estern Jr 

60 Takoma Park Jr 

61 Montgomery Hills Jr 

62 Kensington Jr 

63 Eastern Jr 

61 Carver Colored Sr. 

65 Lincoln Colored Jr. 



Enroll- 


Core 


English ! 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


; ment 










Studies 






matics 






Q 


u 




rJ 


Li 




Q 


JL 


Li 




G 




1,164 


1,221 


299 


297 


865 


924 


861 


920 


876 


923 


992 


975 




339 


311 






339 


311 


338 


310 


291 


241 


227 


18u 




242 


257 






949 


257 


241 


257 


101 


93 


200 


173 




34 


29 


34 


29 












29 


34 


29 




41 


37 






4 j 


37 


41 


37 


41 


37 


41 


37 




53 


54 






zo 
Oo 


54 


53 


54 


53 


54 


53 


54 




192 


237 


117 


109 


75 


128 


75 


128 


1 75 


198 


19b 


2U 




263 


296 


148 


159 


115 


137 


113 


134 


1 81 
181 


271 


241 


288 




1,089 


1,058 


176 


176 


G1 1 


889 

88- 


818 


792 


019 

y iL 


867 


801 


749 




250 


240 


99 


105 


1 51 
101 


135 


151 


135 


9 03 


189 


161 


150 




83 


94 






83 


94 


83 


94 


^83 


94 


58 


68 




275 


266 






275 


266 


222 


212. 


203 


141 


168 


l'2'L 




190 


183 






1 on 
iyu 


1 8Q 
180 


190 


183 


1 on 
iyu 


183 


190 


183 




291 


275 


77 71 


214 


9 (VI 


172 


168 


9QQ 
LOO 


9 60 


224 


226 




2,536 


2 ,536 


1 ,44^ 1 ,415 


1,086 


1,121 


938 


984 


1 ,362 


1,176 


1,835 


1,758 




709 


726 


225 


192 


484 


5Q.1 


439 


478 


50Q 

oyo 


OLV 


39b 


314 




324 


292 


200 


176 


1 99 

ILL 


1 1 fi 
I 1 O 


88 


95 


170 


142 


233 


200 




114 


87 


64 


61 


50 


OP. 
LU 


50 


26 


RR 
OO 


34 


79 


74 




288 


286 


166 


164 


122 


1 99 
III 


84 


62 


1 R9 
IVL 


1 1 9 

1 IL 


193 


200 




209 


'^23 


119 


129 


90 


94 


90 


Q4 


OR 
80 


8< 


134 


1 44 




145 


147 


52 


42 


Ho 


1UO 


93 


105 


78 
/ 8 


95 


112 


120 




472 


486 


472 


486 










1 O 

iy 


1 c 

18 


472 


486 




80 


83 


89 


83 










27 


24 


8C 


83 




195 


206 


70 


82 


125 


124 


94 


124 


161 


144 


131 


137 




992 


952 


992 


952 










ini 


381 


715 


627 




414 


392 


414 


392 










1 aft 


164 


312 


270 




578 


5fin 


578 


560 










951 


225 


403 


357 




2,388 


2,381 


1 ,553 


1,495 


CQ5 
800 


CCA 
880 


709 


697 


1 , 1 1 O 


1 021 


2,137 


1 ,944 




372 


356 


258 


232 


114 


124 


99 


95 


157 


'l39 


345 


296 




792 


784 


4281 410 


364 


374 


274 


2M 


398 


336 


733 


632 




422 


484 


278 


300 


144 


1 QA 


125 


139 


1 RR 


191 


351 


373 




272 


OL-i 


174 


205 


oc 


109 


96 


87 


105 


1 16 


233 


240 




226 


189 


226 


189 










5ft 


52 


226 


T«o 




172 


159 


98 


96 


1 4 


RQ 
OO 


74 


63 


1 1 ft 


92 


136 


129 




132 


95 


91 


63 


41 


32 


41 


32 


132 


95 


113 


85 




1,118 


1,135 


566 


528 


r r O 


Rft7 


468 


531 


OQ7 

yy / 


914 


91f 


803 




320 


336 






320 


Q9R 
000 


241 


260 


9 £9 

LOL 


208 


193 


116 




177 


170 


100 


72 




08 

y8 


72 


98 


1 5Q 

ioy 


141 


156 


111 




129 


130 


129 


130 


■ ■ 








1 90 


131 


129 


130 




162 


207 


128 


140 


34 


e- 
0( 


34 


67 


1 R9 

10/ 


207 


162 


207 




104 


92 


71 


71 


33 


21 


33 


21 


1 n 1 


09 

X)L 


104 


92 




226 


200 


138 


115 


88 


85 


88 


85 


191 


1 RR 
100 


17- 


147 




624 


586 


329 


293 


90S 


90 'J 

_yo 


295 


293 


5J8 
048 


508 


509 


486 




91 


88 


58 


55 


33 


00 


33 


33 


c - 

8( 


76 


78 


75 




258 


235 


110 


92 


148 


143 


148 


143 


91 C 
L 18 


197 


200 


175 




97 


86 


42 


31 


55 


55 


55 


55 


Oft 




78 


78 




178 


177 


119 


115 


59 


RO 
Ol 


59 


62 


1 5*1 

1 OO 


158 


153 


158 




7,776 
880 


7,605 


1,270 


1,209 


6 ,493 


,389 


5,979 


5,838 


1 son 


1 991 


6,815 


5.631 




971 


876 


ORC 

yos 


733 


7H* 


605 


5^5 


774 


468 




944 


917 






939 


915 


789 


711 


7ftfi 
1 WO 


563 


745 


363 




135 


141 


70 


55 


65 


86 


62 


86 


59 


' sli 


98 


101 




529 


449 


149 


127 


380 


322 


332 


295 


378 


348 


383 


218 




431 


404 






431 


404 


421 


404 


282 


245 


349 


24 s 




439 


426 






435 


426 


410 


385 


256 


269 


298 


248 




184 


169 






184 


169 


184 


164 


102 


102 


128 


103 




819 


713 






819 


713 


739 


661 


443 


408 


690 


562 




163 


172 


163 


172 














163 


172 




612 


617 


612 


617 










320 


301 


612 


617 




464 


461 






4G4 


461 


446 


459 


258 


216 


464 


461 




448 


467 






lis 


467 


448 


467 


248 


229 


448 


467 




444 


:w 






444 


398 


444 


398 


214 


174 


444 


398 




371 


310 


276 


238 


95 


72 


94 


72 


197 


165 


371 


310 




483 


136 






483 


436 


483 


436 


306 


258 


483 


436 




167 


239 






167 


239 


131 


159 


71 


87 


102 


1 16 




263 


315 






263 


313 


263 


313 


154 


191 


263 


313 



Maryland State Department of Education 259 



County Public High School : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



French 




Ag 
cult 


ri- 

ure 


Industri 


a] 


Home 
Econorn 


cs 




Physical 
Education 










Gen. 


* 

Voc. 


Arts 


u 

Edu. 


1 "~ 
Gen. 




Voc. 


Sub 






B 






drafts 



B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


B 


B 


G 


B 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


G 


B 


G 


I 56 


83 






131 


157 


642 








591 


57 


125 


369 


1 .u." 


1 ,007 


817 


1 802 


152 




208 


I 17 


11 








68 


203 








215 




68 


155 


324 


309 


225 


190 






3 21 


17 










82 








112 




43 


88 


202 


183 


179 


166 


93 


72 


B - 












34 
















34 


29 


5 


15 






m ■ 




















37 








41 


34 


41 


37 






m 








37 


16 










54 








53 


54 


53 


54 






f 14 


27 






35 


34 


140 








56 


13 


6 


50 


168 


188 


176 


180 




58 


8 4 


28 






59 


39 


183 








117 


44 


S 


76 


207 


210 


138 


160 


59 


78 


g 48 


77 








165 


556 




16 




557 


62 


234 


286 


1 ,004 


980 


683 


707 


335 


297 


10 22 


26 








96 


166 .. 






208 




85 


78 


'240 


233 


168 


161 






11 












76 .. 






84 




12 


14 


83 


92 










12 2 


26 










139 


16 




131 




1171 140 


217 


226 


161 


219 


145 


114 


s 




























190 


183 


190 


183 


190 


183 


I 24 


25 








69 


175 








134 


62 


20 


54 


274 


246 


164 


144 






15 50 


121 






35 


306 


1 ,404 








1 ,472 


58 


589 


783 


2,370 


2,045 


1,572 


1 ,564 


837 


829 


§ 27 


54 








108 


345 






432 




211 


366 


584 


417 


196 


137 


207 


132 


17 3 


17 








81 


138 








103 


13 


74 


65 


247 


195 


153 


140 






■ 










29 


83 








86 








112 


86 


107 


86 






19 5 


19 








44 


155 








122 




58 


81 


288 


269 


189 


225 


119 


176 


20 4 


15 










161 








186 




159 


186 


202 


168 


1191 128 






■ 11 


16 








44 










111 




44 


25 


144 


140 


93 


110 


\7 


ii 














228 








247 








472 


486 


472 


486 


472 


486 


i 












127 








83 








127 


83 


80 


83 






B 












167 








102 


45 


43 


60 


194 


201 


163 


169 


22 


24 


■ 31 


62 


18 


17 




212 


652 








494 


211 


151 


335 


785 


561 


743 


779 


364 


289 


26 6 


13 








108 


347 








191 


97 


46 


122 


323 


231 


332 


372 






■ 25 


49 


is 


17 




104 


305 








303 


114 


105 


213 


462 


330 


411 


407 


364 


289 


1 61 


105 








175 


1 ,545 


1 


34 


19 


1,496 


31 


150 


514 


2,165 


2,013 


1,863 


1 ,841 


1,086 


1,094 


!9 7 


22 










187 








182 




61 


83 


363 


334 


295 


248 


118 


97 


10 42 55 








58 


663 


1 






627 




27 


180 


635 


514 


502 


479 


446 


441 


!1 6 


9 








117 


202 








240 


12 


23 


143 


411 


457 


356 


433 


216 


225 


a 6 


19 










112 








143 


19 


35 


78 


228 


265 


180 


238 


173 


215 


f§ 












120 








109 








224 


189 


226 


189 


106 


80 


K 












129 








100 




4 


30 


172 


159 


172 


159 


27 


36 


IS 












132 








95 








132 


95 


132 


95 






■ 38 


44 






22 


173 


575 








826 


36 


211 


320 


1,079 


1,004 


832 


948 


277 


320 


W 21 


23 








45 


212 








138 




120 


213 


287 


224 


115 


211 


116 


113 


:8 3 


11 








66 










128 




26 


54 


172 


152 


141 


141 






w 












129 








130 








129 


129 


129 


130 






m 




















207 








161 


207 


161 


207 


161 


207 


wt 












104 








92 








104 


92 


104 


92 






K 14 


10 






22 


62 


130 








131 


36 


65 


53 


226 


200 


182 


167 






m 13 


22 


16 


13 




74 


281 








342 


51 


112 


103 


588 


512 


446 


479 


58 


55 


B 












74 








55 


20 


14 


16 


91 


88 


73 


87 


58 


55 


m 




16 


13 




46 










114 




71 


66 


234 


184 


162 


178 






m 












71 








58 




27 


21 


98 


85 


61 


71 






■ 13 


22 








28 


136 








115 


3i 






165 


155 


150 


143 






8 224 


393 


355 


411 


55 


135 


5,267 


267 


615 




4,140 


313 


734 


1,653 


6,827 


6,366 


4,089 


4,299 


2,879 


3,053 


I 98 


190 


150 


177 






511 


80 


29 




225 


40 


156 


377 


766 


679 


197 


364 


78 


159 


■ 72 


105 


142 


150 






505 


71 


108 




206 


51 


274 


471 


581 


474 


133 


207 


94 


162 


I 3 


13 








44 


66 








54 


25 


10 


40 


133 


130 


76 


99 


67 


71 


I 6 


5 


8 


27 






249 


i 


141 




195 


37 


88 


209 


453 


326 


263 


290 


179 


167 


1 23 


43 


16 


10 






258 




63 




192 


98 


16 


72 


382 


359 


265 


220 


212 


201 


1 




12 


12 




49 


300 


8 






232 




106 


204 


402 


393 


215 


241 


161 


151 


9 


6 








42 


122 








119 




27 


65 


169 


144 


102 


107 






5 


3 


27 


35 






544 


16 


101 




358 


30 


58 


136 


713 


619 


423 


406 


399 


360 














163 








172 








163 


172 


163 


172 


163 


172 


t 












467 


25 






428 








606 


613 


411 


419 


256 


281 














345 








366 








459 


456 


347 


363 


257 


214 














383 








372 








448 


465 


249 


298 


111 


134 














351 








327 








442 


394 


364 


339 


293 


307 














306 








245 








351 


301 


319 


251 


218 


228 














401 








376 








483 


436 


371 


353 


298 


310 


8 


28 










77 


49 


173 






32 




79 


99 


163 


37 


84 


48 


62 








• - 




219 


17 






273 








177 


242 


154 


86 


45 


74 



260 Eighty-Ninth Annual Report 



TABLE XXIX— Continued— Enrollment by Subject, Excluding Duplicates: Each Maryla 





Total 


























Enroll- 


Core 


English 


Social 


Science 


Mathe- 


Latin 


County 


ment 










Studies 






matics 




Name of High School 












1 




















B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 


B 


G 




1 


1 Prince George's 


8 ,826 


8 ,860 


5,887 


5,787 


2 ,937 


3 071 


2 ,712 


2 ,629 


4 037 


3 638 
388 


7,445 


6,748 


25J 






'849 


709 






848 


708 


77( 


522 


538 


367 


269 


7$ 






739 


837 






738 


837 


681 


728 


54C 


441 


535 


345 


lOi 




4 High Poiat Sr.-Jr 


746 


754 


478 


461 


268 


293 


20C 


208 


317 


322 


686 


583 


5^ 






271 


266 


240 220 


31 


4f 


31 


4f 


124 


102 


177 


159 






6 Suitland Sr.-Jr 


1,020 


1,055 


554 


! 510 


46£ 


54-1 


451 


533 


507 


407 


873 


676 


31 






301 


286 


196 


177 


105 


109 


101 


99 


127 


115 


266 


1 224 








275 


286 


170 


170 


105 


116 


105 


1 1C 


193 


178 


251 210 








250 


26-^ 


191 


202 


59 


61 


58 


04 


1 15 


97 


205 


195 






10 Oxon Hill Sr.-Jr 


532 


47f 


331 


284 


201 


195 


198 


169 


227 


187 


424 


357 






1 1 Blactensburg Jr 


663 


615 


663 


615 










203 


182 


663 615 








588 


639 


588 


I 639 










202 


20C 


588 


639 






13 Mt. Rainier Jr 


338 


358 


338 


358 










110 


115 


338 


358 






14 Maryland Park Jr 


511 


430 


511 


430 










131 


122 


499 


420 








230 


245 


230 


245 










67 


67 


230 


245 








388 


362 


388 


362 










93 


90 


388 


362 






1 7 Douglass Colored Sr -Jr 


347 


386 


231 


225 


116 


161 


ii6 


160 


167 


207 


311 


331 






18 Fairmont Heights Colored Sr.-Jr 


613 


725 


613 


725 










270 


317 


479 


596 








59 


69 


59 


69 














59 


69 






20 Lakeland Colored Jr. 


106 


95 


106 


95 










106 


95 


106 


95 






21 Queen Anne's 


661 


680 


82 


77 


579 


601 


575 


577 


504 


544 


513 


508 






22 Sudlersville Sr.-Jr 


133 


165 




•• 


133 


163 


133 


163 


93 


123 


98 


113 








233 


21S 






233 


212 


230 


189 


187 


183 


164 


143 








103 


1 If 






103 


119 


102 


118 


84 


92 


73 


80 








192 


184 


82 


77 


11C 


107 


110 


107 


140 


146 


178 


172 






26 St. Mary's 


753 


764 


90 


80 


656 


676 


656 


675 


682 


647 


666 


574 


44 






173 


173 


9C 


8C 


83 


93 


83 92 


151 


128 


137 


121 


8 




28 Great Mills Sr.-Jr 


265 


265 






263 


261 


263 


261 


239 


217 


238 


186 


36 




29 Leonardtown Sr.-Jr 


80 


97 






8C 


97 


80 


97 


79 


97 


74 


75 






30 Banneker Colored Sr.-Jr 


153 


162 






148 


158 


148 


158 


140 


144 


135 


125 






3 1 .Tarhnpsivillp OnlnrpH Sr • Tr 


82 


67 






82 


67 


82 


67 


73 


61 


82 


67 






32 Somerset 


812 


804 


481 


436 


334 


364 


333 


361 


751 


729 


716 


684 


13 




33 Washington Sr.-Jr 


174 


175 


109 


105 


65 


70 


65 


67 


153 


149 


133 


140 






34 Crisfield Sr.-Jr 


185 


197 


120 


119 


65 


78 


64 


78 


169 


170 


168 


160 


13 




35 Marion Sr -Jr 


58 


65 


35 


34 


26 


28 


26 


28 


50 


53 


48 


53 








38 


51 


19 


25 


19 


26 


19 


26 


35 


47 


35 


40 






37 Ewell Jr 


14 


10 






14 


10 


14 


10 


14 


10 


14 


10 






38 Somerset Colored Sr.-Jr 


227 


214 


123 


95 


104 


1 18 


104 


118 


214 


208 


215 


198 






39 Woodson Colored Sr.-Jr 


116 


92 


75 


58 


41 


34 


41 


34 


116 


92 


103 


83 






40 Talbot 




829 


291 


307 


486 


521 


479 


502 


677 


728 


650 


671 


25 






377 


414 


177 


184 


200 


229 


193 


211 


326 


357 


318 


342 


12 




42 St. Michaels Sr.-Jr 


156 


150 






156 


150 


156 


150 


1 19 


134 


117 


118 


13 






244 


265 


114 


123 


130 


142 


130 


141 


232 


237 


215 


211 






44 Washington 


3 6° 9 


o ,Oo( 


930 


968 


2 697 


2 569 


2, 4081 2, 382 


2 859 


2 434 


2,753 


2,474 


83 


2; 




7C7 


Q"i 1 






7S7 
lot 


831 


504 


662 


567 


457 


245 


199 


17 




46 Williamsport Sr -Jr 


270 


259 


112 


118 


1 


141 


149 


141 


242 


205 


174 


161 


4 






274 


269 


124 


112 


1 48 


157 


155 


146 


245 


238 


175 


158 


10 


: 




207 


220 


91 


93 


1 16 


127 


116 


127 


182 


182 


176 


165 








533 


471 


98 


89 


435 


382 


431 


376 


483 


388 


476 


392 


18 






202 


226 


89 


110 


113 


116 


113 


115 


196 


200 


148 


156 






51 Maugansville Sr.-Jr 


51 


63 


25 


39 


26 


24 


26 


24 


51 


63 


51 


63 










387 






436 


387 


436 


387 


428 


348 


436 


387 


g 




53 Woodland Way Jr 


1 10 


Q7C 






449 


378 


449 


378 


280 


198 


455 


380 


19 




54 Wiishin^to'i Jr 


338 


359 


338 


359 










1 ( 13 


81 


338 


359 


7 




55 North Street Colored Sr.-Jr 


82 


74 


53 


48 


29 


26 


29 


26 


82 


74 


79 


54 






56 Wicomico 


1 ,544 


1 ,533 






1 ,5 1 1 


1 ,533 


1 ,438 


1 ,453 


1,376 


1 ,275 


1 ,214 


1 ,202 


130 


ii 




362 


357 






362 


357 


328 


306 


236 


183 


138 


119 


40 




58 Mardela Sr.-Jr 


76 


60 






76 


60 


76 


60 


67 


50 


60 


52 






59 Pittsville Sr.-Jr 


86 


78 






86 


78 


86 


78 


86 


78 


66 


56 






Ml II, l,r,, ( fr 


41 


40 






44 


40 


44 


40 


44 


40 


35 


29 




i 






621 






590 

386 


621 


525 


529 


590 


618 


590 


621 


66 


62 Salisbury Colored Sr.-Jr 


386 


377 






377 


379 


440 


353 


306 


325 


325 


24 








911 
149 


640 


549 


372 


362 


361 
60 


363 


524 


491 


767 


692 


27 






156 


94 


94 


62 


55 


55 


84 


67 


126 


109 


5 




65 Snow Hill Sr.-Jr 


176 


169 


95 


89 


81 


80 


81 


80 


117 


119 


125 


122 


13 


i 


66 Stephen Decatur Sr.-Jr. 


337 


306 


200 


179 


136 


127 


127 


128 


198 


201 


232 


227 




i 




344 


287 


251 


187 


93 


100 


93 


100 


125 


104 


284 


234 


9 



* Includes the following number Of girls taking Vocational Agriculture: Frederick, r,mmitsburg Sr.-Jr.— 1; Thur- 
mont Sr.-Jr. I; Howard, Howard County Sr.-Jr.— 2; Washington, Smithsburg Sr.-Jr.— 1. 

t Include the following number of boys and girls taking Diversified Occupations: Baltimore, Dundalk Sr.— 22 boys; 
Kenwood Sr. 17 boys, 9 girls; Dorchester, Cambridge Sr. 16 boys; Montgomery, Hethesda-Chevy Chase Sr. — 21 boys, 
8 girls; Montgomery, Hlair Sr. 40 boys, 23 girls; Richard Montgomery Sr.-Jr.— 11 boys, 11 girls; Prince George's, 
Suitland Sr.-Jr.— 10 boys, 13 girls. 



Maryland State Department of Education 
ujttfl County Public High School : Year Ending June 30, 1955 



261 



27 

28 
29 
30 
31 

32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 

40 
41 
42 

43 

II 44 
45 
I 46 
I 47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 

56 
57 
58 
59 



French 



Spanish 



B G 



3f.fi 
68 
78 
7 
28 
40 

23 

59 



Agri- 
culture 



Gen. 



78 



Voc. 



28 



36 



165 



Industrial 



5,897 
214 
401 
151 
147 
742 
165 
128 
162 
401 
663 
588 
338 
499 
230 
388 
146 
428 

106 

522 
117 
18 
9 

127 
58 



528 
235 
119 
174 

304 2 ,533 
58 245 
127 
86 
173 
399 
175 
25 
436 
149 
336 
82 



26 



1 ,11 



u 

Edu 



105 



Home 
Economics 



Gen. 



331 



59 



28 5,456 
64 
33 
475 
134 
554 
192 
142 
174 
265 
615 
639 
358 
420 
245 
362 
236 
18 453 



95 

464 
116 
139 
92 
117 

422 
112 
121 

97 
65 
27 



Voc. 



92 



118 

92 

495 
250 
88 
157 

2,225 
231 
121 

93 
142 
316 

71 

63 
387 
378 
350 

73 

1 ,004 
45 
60 
49 



848 
228 
209 
120 

103 



38 



38 



32 



Business 
Subjects 



2,579 
687 
508 
179 
121 
467 
69 
83 
110 
123 



52 



Physical 
Education 



7,462 
41 
460 
694 
255 
831 
247 
248 
238 
443 
663 
569 
338 
497 
217 
388 
311 
480 
59 
106 

635 
133 
230 
80 
192 

725 
163 
253 

79 
148 

82 



7,061 
361 
407 
668 
225 
705 
232 
195 
229 
379 
615 
597 
358 
423 
232 
362 
302 
607 
69 
95 

645 
160 
210 
91 
184 

473 
153 

95 
158 
67 



Music 



756 738 

169 172 

185 197 

57 64 



182 
112 
41 

29 

1,017 
688 
82 
61 
58 
55 
49 



3 


24 


196 


350 


137 


268 


15 


8 


12 


11 


5 


11 


27 


52 


201 


224 


32 


44 


34 


52 


94 


88 


41 


40 



229 
116 

581 
283 
113 
185 

3,249 
532 
254 
234 
177 
516 
188 

51 
436 
441 
338 

82 

1,197 
123 
76 
86 
44 
494 
374 

917 
140 
158 
277 
342 



1,122 
90 
60 
78 
40 
510 
344 

804 
130 
153 

235 
286 



,399 
83 
85 
259 
126 
448 
153 
205 
127 
232 
663 
360 
165 
282 
145 
229 
258 
414 
59 
106 

459 
87 



192 



101 
170 
80 
135 

82 

450 

161 
24 



157 



Art-Arts 
and Crafts 



2,531 
132 
206 
205 
135 
368 
129 

51 
436 
449 
338 

82 

939 
61 

74 
44 
490 
270 



4,655 
109 
158 
257 
148 
446 
152 
236 
133 
231 
615 
409 
196 
340 
156 
208 
265 
432 
69 
95 

448 
102 
162 

184 

565 
119 
135 

97 
147 

67 

421 

i6i 

26 
25 

134 
75 

537 
236 
88 
213 



2,779 
367 
231 
22s 
152 
364 
176 

63 
387 
378 
35!; 

74 

1,052 
101 

67 
40 
537 
307 

670 
96 
83 
207 
284 



4,510 
143 

58 
416 
114 
566 
113 
172 
106 

36 
663 
395 
26' 
397 
146 
273 
17 
40 

59 



50 
50 

155 
131 

24 
14 



1,147 

63 

131 



394 
309 
197 
53 

653 
49 
76 
33 
44 

151 



4,094 
72 
74 
393 
98 
481 
49 
189 
102 
47 
615 
422 
285 
218 
147 
242 
161 
430 
69 



48 
48 

138 

iii 

27 
10 



67 



52 
128 



367 
275 
238 
48 

716 
59 
60 
29 
40 

528 



t Includes the following number of girls taking Industrial Education: Montgomery, Wheaton Sr.-Jr.— 28: Carver, 
Colored Sr.— 62. 

° Includes the following number of boys taking Vocational Home Economics: Anne Arundel, Bates Colored Sr.-Jr— 8; 
Howard, Harriet Tubman Colored Sr.-Jr.— 2. 



INDEX 



A 

Academic course, each high school, 250-255 
Accreditation and certification, 34-40 
Administration 

Cost per pupil, 150-151 

Expenditures, 236 

Per cent for, 148-149 

Superintendents, 2, 5-10, 231, 236 
Adult education, 170, 174-175, 239 
Agriculture 

Adult education, 169, 174-176 

Enrollment, 96-97, 107 

Each high school, 256-261 

Failures and withdrawals, 117 

Federal aid, 169-174 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

State supervision, 2 

Teachers, 98 
Aid from State and/or Federal funds 

Counties and Baltimore City, distribution 
by type of fund, 144-147, 211, 232-233, 
249 

State teachers colleges. 200-201, 211, 213 
Vocational education. 169-170, 174, 211, 

233 

Vocational rehabilitation, 207, 211 
Appropriations 

County, 144-147, 186-187, 211, 234 

State. 144-147, 211, 234 
Art. high school 

Enrollment, 96-97, 108 

Each high school, 256-261 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Assessable basis, 188-190 
Attendance 

Aggregate days of, 228 

Average daily, 227 

Each high school, 250-255 

Per cent of, 229 

Summer school pupils, 204 

Teachers at summer school, 119 

Workers (see Pupil personnel) 
Atypical children, 74 

Auxiliary agencies (see Other school services) 

B 

Bands, orchestras, glee clubs, 110 
Basic aid per classroom unit, 211, 232 
Belonging, average number, 226 

Each high school, 250-255 

Per teacher, 79 
Birth rates. 75-77 

Board of Education, State, 2, 211-212 
Boards of Education, County, 5-10 
Bonds outstanding, school, 182 
Books and instructional materials 
Cost per pupil 

Elementary, 152-154 
High, 155-157 
Expenditures 

All schools, 237 
Elementary, 243-245 
High, 246-248 
Per cent of current expense budget, 148- 
149 

Boys and girls 
Enrollment 

Nonpublic. 220-221 
Public, 218-219 
Craduates, high school. 88-95, 250-255 
Budget(s> 

Baltimore City, county, local, 144-147, 

186-187 
State public school, 211 
State teachers colleges, 211, 213 
Buildings 

Cost (see Capital outlay) 



B — (Continued) 

Number of, 141-142, 217 
Value of school, per pupil, 183-184 
Business education 
Adult, 175-177 

Enrollment, 96-97, 109, 160-173, 175, 177 

Each high school, 256-261 
Failures and withdrawals, 116 
Schools offering, 98, 256-261 
Teachers, 98 

c 

Capital outlay, school, 149 

By site, building, equipment, 242 

Certificates held by county teachers, 120-124 

Certification and accreditation, 34-40 

Classes 

Evening school. 175-177 
Size of, 79 

Special for handicapped, 72-73 
Summer school, Baltimore City, 204 
Clerks, county schools, 231 
Colleges 

High school graduates 

of 1954 entering, 90-95 
of 1955 entering State teachers col- 
leges, 89, 250-255 
Junior, 196, 198-199 

State teachers, 5, 194-198, 200-201, 211, 
213-216 

Training teachers appointed in Maryland 
counties, 118 
Commercial (see Business education) 
Consolidation 

Decrease in one-teacher schools. 139 

Transportation of pupils, 164-168 
Construction accounts, State teachers colleges. 

214-216 
Core program, high school 

Enrollment, 96-97 

Each high school, 256-261 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Cost per pupil 

Administration. 150-1^1 

Analyzed for elementary and high, 152-157 
By type of school, 151 
Transported, 164, 167 
Costs (see Expenditures) 

County superintendents, directors, supervisors. 
5-10 

Courses in individual high schools. 250-255 
Crippled children, services for, 72-74 
Current expenses 

Cost per pupil, 150-157 
Expenditures 

All schools, 235 

Bv source of funds, 146-147 
By type of school, 243-248 

D 

Dates, opening and closing of schools, 66 
Days in session, 66-67, 229 
Debt service 

1954-55. 183. 186-187, 241 

Tax rate for, 185 
Disbursements (see Expenditures I 
Distributive education, 169-173 
Driver education and training, high school 

Enrollment, 111 

Schools offering, 98 

Teachers, 98 

E 

Elementary schools, supervision, 143, 231 
Emergency certificates, 120-124 
Employment of high school graduates. 90-95 



2G2 



Index 



263 



E — (Continued) 

English, high school 

Enrollment, 96, 97, 99 

Each high school, 256-261 
Failures and withdrawals, 116-117 
Schools offering, 98, 256-261 
Teachers, 98 
Enrollment 

Adult, 175, 177 

Atypical children, 74 

Elementary, 68, 69-71, 80-85, 218-225 

Grade or year, 80-85 

High school 

Course, each school, 250-255 
Growth in, 162-163 
Subjects, 96-97, 99-109, 111 

Each school, 256-261 
Year, 81-85 

Each school, 250-255 
Increase in, 69-71 

Nonpublic, private and parochial, 68-71 
220-225 

Number different pupils, 69-71, 218-219 
Public, 68-71, 80-85, 218-219 
State teachers colleges, 196-198 
Subjects, 96-97, 99-109, 111 

Each school, 256-261 
Summary, 68-71 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 204 
Equalization fund, 146-147, 232 
Equivalence examinations, 205 
Evening schools and courses 
Enrollment, 175, 177 
Expenditures, 169-170, 174, 239 
Expenditures, 235-249 

(see also Administration, Instruction, Op- 
eration, Maintenance, Fixed charges, 
Other school services, Payments to ad- 
joining counties, Current expenses, Debt 
service, Capital outlay) 
Elementary schools, 243-245 
Evening schools, 169-170, 174, 239 
Health, 239 
High schools, 246-248 
Libraries, 237 
Rehabilitation, 207, 212 
Salaries 

All schools, 237 
Elementary, 243-245 
High, 162-163, 246-248 
Vocational, 169-174 
State teachers colleges, 200-201, 211, 213 
Total, by major classifications, 211 235 
Transportation, 164, 166-167, 239 
Vocational, Federal, 169-174, 233 

F 

Failures (see Nonpromotions) 

Fall enrollment, 68, 80-85 

Federal aid 

Vocational education, 169-177, 211, 233 
Administration and supervision, 169 
Salaries of teachers, 169-174 

Fees in State teachers colleges, 200-201, 211, 

Financial statements 

State public schools, 211, 232-249 

State teachers colleges, 211, 213-216 
First grade nonpromotions, 87 
Fixed charges, 148-149, 240 
French, high school 

Enrollment, 96-97, 106 

Each high school, 256-261 

Failures and withdrawals, 116 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 

G 

Glee clubs, bands, orchestras, 110 
Grade enrollment, 80-85 
Graduates 

High school, 88-95 



G — (Continued) 

Entering State teachers colleges, 87, 

91-92, 94-95 
From each school, 250-255 
Occupations of, 90-95 
State teachers colleges, 194-195 
Guidance, teachers of, 98 

H 

Handicapped children 

Expenditures, 72, 211 

Home instruction, 72, 218-219 

Hospital schools, 72, 218-219 

Institutions for, 72, 74 

Opportunities for education of, 72-74 

Receipts from State for, 72, 211, 232 

Transportation of, 72 
Health expenditures, all schools, 239 
Hearing, conservation of, 72-74 
High school equivalence examinations. 205 
High schools 

Aid for, 232 

Disbursements, 232, 246-248 

Individual, 250-255, 256-261 

Supervision, 143, 231 
Home economics 

Adult, 169-170, 175-177 

Enrollment, 96-97, 107 

Each high school, 256-261 

Federal aid, 169-174 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Home instruction of pupils, 72, 218-219 
Hospital instruction of pupils, 72, 218-219 

I 

Income payments, per capita, 192-193 
Income tax, per capita, 191 
Incorporated towns, levy for, 186-187 
Industrial arts (see Trades and industries) 
Instruction, division of, 41-50 
Cost per pupil, 152-157 
Expenditures, 243-248 

Salaries, supervision, books, etc., 237 
State teachers colleges, 200-201 
Per cent of current expense budget, 148- 
149 

Inventories, State teachers colleges, 201 
J 

Janitors, repair, utility men, 231 
Junior colleges, 196, 198-199 

K 

Kindergartens, 81, 83-85 
Nonpublic, 220-225 

L 

Languages (see English, French, etc.) 

Latin (see French) 

Legislation, 13-19 

Length of session, 66-67, 229 

Letter of transmittal, 12 

Levies, county, 186-187 

Librarians, county, 4-5 

Libraries 

Expenditures, 209-210, 237 

Public, 4-5, 209 

School. 210 
Library extension, 51-56, 208-210 
Lip reading classes, 73, 177 
Lunch program, school, 178-179, 233, 239 

M 

Maintenance 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 
Expenditures, 238, 243-248 
Per cent of current expense budget, 148- 
149 



264 



Index 



M — (Continued) 

Materials of instruction (see Books and in- 
structional materials) 
Mathematics, high school 

Enrollment, 96-97, 104-105 

Each high school, 256-261 

Failures and withdrawals, 116-117 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Medical examinations, 232 
Men teachers, 140, 230 
Mentally handicapped children, 73 
Milk program, school, 180, 233, 239 
Minimum program, State, 249 
Minutes, State Board, 20-33 
Music, high school 

Enrollment, 96-97, 108 

Each high school, 256-261 

Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 110 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 

N 

Night schools (see Evening schools, Adult 

education ) 
Nonpromotions 

Elementary, 86-87 

First grade, 87 

Subject, high schools, 112-117 
Each subject, 116-117 
One or more subjects, 112-115 
Number belonging, 226 

Each high school, 250-255 

Per teacher, 79 
Number different pupils, 69-71, 218-219 
Number of schools 

For atypical children, 74 

Having one teacher, 138-139, 217 

Nonpublic, 68, 220-225 

Public, 68, 217 

Elementary, 138-139, 141, 217 

High, 142, 217 

o 

Occupations of high school graduates, 90-95 
One-teacher schools 

Decrease in, 139 

Number belonging in, 138 

Number of, 138, 217 
Operation 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 

Expenditures, 238, 243-248 

Per cent current expense budget, 148-149 
Orchestras, bands, glee clubs, 110 
Other school services 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 

Expenditures, 239, 243-248 

Per cent of current expense budget, 148- 
149 

P 

Parent-teacher associations, 203 

Parochial and private schools, 68-71, 220-225 

Part-payment of salaries, 232 

Payments to adjoining counties, 148-149 

Pensions (see Retirement system for teachers) 

Physical education and health, 239 

Physical education and recreation, high school 

Appropriations for, 211 

Enrollment, 96-97, 108 

Each hitfh school, 256-261 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Physical examinations (see Medical examina- 
tions I 

Physically handicapped children, 72-74 
Preparation, teachers, 125-127 
Presidents of State teachers colleges, 5 
Professional and clerical staffs, county, 231 
Private and parochial schools, 68-71, 220-225 
Property, valuation of 



P— (Continued) 

Counties and Baltimore City, 188-189 

School, 183-184 
Psychology (see Social studies) 
Pupil personnel, 5-10 

Supervisors of, 143, 231 
Salaries, 239 

Pupils 

Atypical, 74 

Nonpublic, 68-71, 220-225 
One-teacher schools, 138-139 
Per teacher, 79 
Public school 

Enrollment, 68-71, 218-219 

Number attending, 227 

Number belonging, 226 

Per cent of attendance, 229 
Transported, 164-165 

R 

Receipts from 

All sources, 234 
Federal government, 233 
Evening schools, 174 
Teachers' salaries, 169-174 
Vocational education, 169-174 
State, 232 

Distributed by type of fund, 144-145, 

211, 232 
Evening schools, 174 
Total and per cent. 144-145 
Teachers colleges, 200-201, 211, 213 
Rehabilitation, vocational, 3-4, 63-65, 206-207, 
211-212 

Repair, utility men, janitors, 231 
Resignations, teachers, 128-129 
Retarded children, program for, 72-74 
Retirement system for teachers, 202, 211 

s 

Salaries 

Growth of high school, 162-163 
Per cent of school budget, 148-149 
Superintendents', 236 
Supervisors', 237 

Pupil personnel, 239 
Teachers' 

Average per teacher, 158-161 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 

Supplementary payments, 232 
Total 

Elementary, 243-245 
High, 162-163, 246-248 
Vocational, 169-174 
School lunch program, 178-179, 233, 239 
School milk program, 180, 233, 239 
Schools 

For atypical children, 74 
Number of, 68, 138-139, 141-142, 217, 220- 
225 

Science, high school 

Enrollment. 96-97, 102-103 

Each high school, 256-261 
Failures and withdrawals, 116-117 
Schools offering, 98, 256-261 
Teachers, 98 
Session, length of, 66-67, 229 
Sex of teachers, 140, 230 
Sight conservation classes, 73 
Size of 

Classes, 79 
Schools 

Each high school, 250-255 
Elementary, 138-139, 141 
High, 142 
Teaching staff, 68, 138-139, 230 
Social studies, high school 

Enrollment, 96-97, 100-101 

Each hiprh school, 256-261 
Failures and withdrawals. 116-117 
Schools offering, 98, 256-261 
Teachers, 98 



Index 



265 



S — (Continued) 

Spanish (see French) 

Special classes for handicapped, 72-74 

Special high school teachers, 98 

State 

Aid to schools, 144-147 

Minimum program, 249 
Showing various funds, 211, 232 
Board of Education, 2, 211 

Excerpts from minutes of, 20-33 
Department of Education, 2-4 
Income taxes, 191 
Public school budget, 211-213 
Teachers colleges, 5, 89, 91-92, 94-95, 194- 

198, 200-201, 211, 250-255 
Teachers' retirement system, 5, 202, 211 
Stenography, typing, bookkeeping (see Busi- 
ness education) 
Subjects studied in high schools, 96-111 

Each high school, 256-261 
Summer school attendance 
County teachers, 119 
Pupils, Baltimore City, 204 
Superintendents, 2, 5-10, 231 
Supervisors, supervision 

Cost per pupil, 152-157 
Cost, salaries, expenses, 237 

By type of school, 243-248 
Names of, 2-4, 5-10 
Number of, 142, 231 

Per cent of current expense budget, 148- 
149 

Salaries of, 237, 243-248 
State, 2-4 

T 

Taxable basis, 188-190 

Tax dollar, distribution of school, 148-149 
Tax rates, county, 185 
Teacher (s) 

Academic, high school, 98 

Average salary, 158-161 

Certification, 34-40, 120-124 

Colleges, 5, 89, 91-92, 94-95, 194-198, 200- 

201, 211, 213, 250-255 
Growth in number, 162-163 
Number of, 230 

For each high school subject, 98 
In each high school, 250-255 
In schools of each type 
Atypical, 74 
Nonpublic, 68, 220-225 
Public, 68, 230 

Summer schools, Baltimore City, 
204 

Of atypical children, 74 
Preparation, 125-127 
Pupils per, 79 
Resignations, 128-129 



T— (Continued) 

Salaries 

Average, 158-161 

Growth in high school, 162-163 

Supplementary payments, 232 

Sex of, 140, 230 

Special subjects, high school, 98 

Summary, elementary and high, public 
and nonpublic, 68 

Summer school attendance, 119 

Training institutions, 194-198, 200-201, 
211, 213 

Turnover of, 128-137 
Teachers' retirement system 

Financial statements, 202, 211 

Staff, 5 

Teachers' contributions to, 202 
Trades and industries (Industrial arts) 

Adult, 169-170, 175, 177 

Enrollment, 96, 97, 107, 171-173 
Each high school, 256-261 

Federal aid, 169-174 

Schools offering, 98, 256-261 

Teachers, 98 
Training centers, State teachers colleges, 196- 
197 

Transmittal, letter of, 12 
Transportation of pupils, 164-168, 239 

Cost, total and per pupil, 164, 166-167, 239 

Per cent transported, 164-165 

Physically handicapped, 72 
Tuition charges, State teachers colleges, 200 
Turnover in teaching staff, 128-137 

V 

Value of 

Assessable property, 188-190 
School property, 183-184 
Vocational education, 169-177, 211, 233 
Division of, 57-62 
Enrollment 

Day schools, 96, 97, 107, 171-173, 256- 
261 

Evening schools, 174-177 
Federal aid, 169-173, 211, 233 
State aid, 211 
Vocational rehabilitation, 3-4, 63-65, 206-207, 
211-212 

w 

Wealth back of each pupil, 190 
Withdrawals of pupils 

Elementary, 78 

High, 78, 116-117 
Withdrawals of teachers, 128-129 



Y 

Year, length of session, 66-67, 229 



I 3 ^30 05tti SH g 




COUEGE PARK 




pe for m